Does dieting cause cannabinoid re-intoxication in humans?

Summary

Does dieting cause cannabinoid re-intoxication in humans?

Supervisor(s)

Dr Jonathon Arnold

Research Location

Camperdown - School of Medical Sciences - Bosch Institute

Program Type

Masters/PHD

Synopsis

The main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, THC, is stored in fat for significant periods of time which explains its long elimination half-life. We have recently demonstrated in THC-treated rats that dieting or stress, by promoting fat breakdown, cause THC to be released back into the blood. Accordingly, it is possible that individuals who have kicked their cannabis habit for some time, who decide to go on a diet, may experience a sufficient increase in THC blood levels causing them to be “spontaneously” intoxicated. This phenomenon we have termed “re-intoxication” and it has significant implications for cannabis-related medicolegal cases. This project aims to demonstrate cannabis re-intoxication in human users. Cannabis withdrawing patients will undergo 24 hours of dieting and we will measure whether this increases THC blood levels that correlates with neuropsychological impairment.

Additional Information

Techniques: human study, neuropsychological tests, analytical techniques (HPLC and GCMS)

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Keywords

diet, cannabis, THC

Opportunity ID

The opportunity ID for this research opportunity is: 1181

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