Social capital, brokerage, technology use and performance of project-based workers: Real estate agents in NSW, Australia

Summary

Studies on how individuals seek for both relational and non-relational information have been documented in organizational psychology, organization behavior and communication studies. In the real estate industry, current research suggests that residential real estate agents rely on their personal social networks as well as social technologies to support their work. In this project, social capital theory and social network theories are used to inform a theoretical model for understanding how technology use, social capital, social structure and ties have implications for the performance of project-based workers. The context for the study is the residential real estate agents in NSW, Australia. The high-level questions driving this study are: (i) To what degree does the personal social network structure, position and connectivity of the project-based worker impact performance? (ii) What characteristics of the contractual project-based worker impact personal social network connectivity? (iii) To what extent does technology use and social networks interact with each other in explaining project-based performance?

Supervisor(s)

Dr Kenneth Chung

Research Location

Civil Engineering

Program Type

Masters/PHD

Synopsis

In this project, social capital theory and social network theories are used to inform a theoretical model for understanding how technology use, social capital, social structure and ties have implications for the performance of project-based workers. The context for the study is the residential real estate agents in NSW, Australia.

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Keywords

social network, real estate, real estate agent, social capital, brokerage, technology use, ICT use, broker

Opportunity ID

The opportunity ID for this research opportunity is: 1475

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