‘Productive Ageing’ – Ageing and productivity in the workforce

Summary

This program is being conducted as part of the Health and Productivity research program led by Professor Hal Kendig at the University of Sydney node of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR). Ageing well and productively comprise inter-related work and health dimensions. The broader Health and Productivity research program will examine ways in which health and psycho-social factors influence productive contributions (including workforce participation and care giving) as well as independence, wellbeing, and use of health and community services.

Supervisor(s)

Associate Professor Kate O'Loughlin

Research Location

Ageing, Work and Health Research Group

Program Type

PHD

Synopsis

The global significance of ageing well and ageing productively has been brought back to the forefront by three major worldwide trends. First, the demographic trend of people living longer, healthier lives, will mean greater proportions of healthy individuals living well into their 70s, 80s, and 90s. Second, there is an economic impetus with many governments and policy makers implementing strategies aimed at encouraging older people to remain healthy and productive for longer to minimise dependence in strictly economic terms. Third, there is a social/cultural trend with many older people showing less inclination to retire in the more traditional sense from career work to near-total leisure, and choosing to (if possible) remain active participants in society and continue their engagement in productive activities. Research on productive ageing recognizes that individuals can and often do continue their engagement in activities that have socioeconomic value within their social context, as they age. The research program will include empirical analysis of longitudinal data collected by the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey, a household-based panel study conducted annually since 2000. The vast amount of information collected from subjects, and the longitudinal research focus provides multiple opportunities for PhD-level research on productive ageing. This research capacity could be used for PhD theses including examining the interplay between health and productivity over the life course, and investigating the determinants and consequences of productive activities, particularly for older people. There will be a focus on potentially changeable actions by individuals and governments that can maintain or improve capacities and beneficial consequences for productivity and wellbeing.

Additional Information

This program is being conducted as part of the Health and Productivity research program led by Professor Hal Kendig at the University of Sydney node of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR). Ageing well and productively comprise inter-related work and health dimensions. The broader Health and Productivity research program will examine ways in which health and psycho-social factors influence productive contributions (including workforce participation and care giving) as well as independence, wellbeing, and use of health and community services.

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Keywords

social science, health, socio-economic, longitudinal, economic, gerontology, Ageing, migration, migrants, life-course, Family, occupation, work

Opportunity ID

The opportunity ID for this research opportunity is: 1535

Other opportunities with Associate Professor Kate O'Loughlin