About Dr Andrew Fitzmaurice

Dr Andrew Fitzmaurice’s research interests include: Early Modern British, European and Atlantic history; intellectual history; the history of political thought and the history of colonisation.

Areas of research supervision

  • Early modern history
  • intellectual history
  • European expansion
For more details see: http://sydney.edu.au/arts/history/staff/profiles/fitzmaurice.shtml

Selected publications

Books

David Armitage, Conal Condren and Andrew Fitzmaurice, eds., Shakespeare and early modern political thought (Cambridge University Press, 2009)

Humanism and America: An intellectual history of English colonisation, 1500-1625. (Ideas in Context; Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2003).

Articles & Book Chapters

'Neither neo-Roman nor liberal empire', Renaissance Studies, Vol. 26, No. 4 (September, 2012)

'Powhatan legal claims', in Saliha Belmessous, ed., Native Claims: Indigenous Law against Empire (Oxford University Press, 2012)

Liberalism and Empire in Nineteenth Century International Law’, American Historical Review, Vol. 117, No. 1 (February 2012)

‘Discovery, Conquest, and Occupation of Territory’ in The Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law, edited by Bardo Fassbender, Anne Peters and Simone Peter (Oxford, 2012)

‘The justification of King Leopold II’s Congo enterprise by Sir Travers Twiss’, in Ian Hunter and Shaunnagh Dorsett, eds., Law and Politics in British Colonial Thought (Palgrave, 2010)

‘The corruption of Hamlet’, in David Armitage, Conal Condren and Andrew Fitzmaurice, eds., Shakespeare and early modern political thought (Cambridge University Press, 2009)

‘The resilience of natural law in the writings of Sir Travers Twiss’, in Ian Hall and Lisa Hill, eds., British International Thinkers from Hobbes to Namier (Palgrave, 2009)

‘The Commercial Ideology of Colonisation in Jacobean England: Robert Johnson, Giovanni Botero and the Pursuit of Greatness.’, William and Mary Quarterly, October 2007

‘A genealogy of terra nullius’, Australian Historical Studies, April 2007