About Associate Professor Michael McDonnell

Associate Professor Michael McDonnell’s research interests include: Early and Revolutionary Virginia; American Revolution; Native Americans in North America; Cultural intermediaries and brokers; Popular politics in the early Atlantic; and Labour, race, class and class struggles in the early Atlantic.

Current projects
Beyond Borders: Indians, French and Métis and the Making and Unmaking of the Atlantic World

Areas of research supervision

  • Colonial America
  • Early Native Americans
  • Race and Class in the early modern Atlantic
 For more details see: http://sydney.edu.au/arts/history/staff/profiles/mcdonnell.shtml

Selected publications

Books

Distant Empires: French, Métis, and Anishinaabe Communities in the Making and Unmaking of the Atlantic World (forthcoming, New York: Hill and Wang, a Division of Farrar, Strauss, & Giroux).

W. Fitzhugh Brundage, Frances Clarke, Clare Corbould, and Michael A. McDonnell, eds., Remembering the Revolution: Memory, History, and Nation-Making in the US from Independence to the Civil War, (forthcoming, University of Massachusetts Press for their Public History in the Historical Perspective series, 2012).

The Politics of War: Race, Class, and Conflict in Revolutionary Virginia (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, 2007). 568 pp.

Book Chapters

“The Struggle Within: Colonial Politics on the Eve of Independence,” in Edward Gray and Jane Kamensky, eds., Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution (forthcoming, Oxford University Press, 2012).

"War and Nationhood: Founding Myths and Historical Realities, in W. Fitzhugh Brundage, Frances Clarke, Clare Corbould, and Michael A. McDonnell, eds., Remembering the Revolution: Memory, History, and Nation-Making in the US from Independence to the Civil War, (forthcoming, University of Massachusetts Press for their Public History in the Historical Perspective series, 2012).

"Facing Empire: Indigenous Histories in Comparative Perspective" in Kate Fullagar, ed., The Atlantic World in a Pacific Field: Effects and Transformations since the Eighteenth-Century (forthcoming, Cambridge Scholarly Publishing, 2012).

“Jefferson’s Virginia,” in Francis D. Cogliano, ed., A Companion to Thomas Jefferson (Wiley-Blackwell, 2011), 16-31.

“French Colonialism and Indigenous Identities,” in Gregory D. Smithers, Brian D. Behnken, and Brooke N. Newman, Native Diasporas: Indigenous Identities and Settler Colonialism in North America (forthcoming, University of Nebraska Press, 2012).

“’The Spirit of Levelling’: James Cleveland, Edward Wright, and the Struggle for Equality in Revolutionary Virginia,” in Young, Gary B. Nash, and Ray Raphael, eds., Revolutionary Founders: Rebels, Radicals, and Reformers in the Making of a Nation (New York: Alfred A. Knopf and Vintage Anchor Publishing, a division of Random House, Inc., 2011), 135-154.

“Dancing With Shadows: Biography and the Making and Remaking of the Atlantic World,” in Desley Deacon, Penny Russell, and Angela Woollacott, eds., Transnational Lives: Biographies of Global Modernity, 1700-Present (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), 54-66.