Coastal Remote Sensing Workshop 22 July 2015

Recordings of Presentations


Dr Eleanor Bruce

Dr Eleanor Bruce

Workshop Introduction

Dr Kevin Davies

Dr Kevin Davies

Optical Remote Sensing of Coastal and Marine Environments: A Brief Overview

Dr Sarah Hamylton

Dr Sarah Hamylton

Challenges in the use of Remote Sensing Data for Mapping, Monitoring and Modelling in Coral Reef Environments

Dr Peter Fearns

Dr Peter Fearns

Remote Sensing to Support Monitoring of Dredge Activities

Professor Merv Lynch

Professor Merv Lynch

Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Observations of Coastal Waters

Dr Tim Parsons

Dr Tim Parsons

Cubesats & their potential

Dr Chris Roelfsema

Download audio

Dr Roy Hughes

Sensors for Coastal Remote Sensing
Download PowerPoint presentation (PDF)


Coastal Remote Sensing Workshop

Acting Network Leader Dr Eleanor Bruce opening the Workshop.

On Wednesday 22nd July Sydney SpaceNet hosted a Coastal Remote Sensing Workshop. The workshop brought together coastal and marine researchers across Australia in order to review recent advancements in coastal applications, identify gaps in capabilities, and possible solutions, especially those involving microsatellites.

The vastness of Australia’s marine territory and extensive coastline highlights the importance of earth observation science. Australia has rights and responsibilities over 16 million square kilometres of ocean which supports high biodiversity, the country’s fifth largest food production industry, submarine mineral resource potential and one of the world’s largest shipping industries. Space measurements are recognized in Australia’s satellite utilization policy (2013) as “the single most important and richest source of environmental information for Australia”. Applications range from investigating global decadal trends in primary production to monitoring human-induced change along highly populated coastlines.



The workshop covered the following themes:

  1. Applications in Coastal Science, including
    - Coral environments
    - Saltmarsh, mangroves and seagrasses
    - Catchment influences on nearshore environments
    - Multi-scale shoreline and ocean processes
    - Primary production and algal blooms
    - Benthic environments
  2. Sensor instrumentation and performance priorities, current and future.
  3. Classification and algorithm development.
  4. Unrecognised gaps and needs.

Speakers

Workshop breakout discussion

Breakout discussion in the afternoon.

Dr Kevin Davies (University of Technology Sydney)
Kevin Davies is a researcher in remote sensing with a focus on developing new techniques for mapping and quantifying vegetation dynamics in support of ecosystem research. Kevin Davies received a PhD in Remote Sensing, and a Masters in Environmental Management from the University of Sydney, and a Bachelors of Information Technology from the University of Technology Sydney. His PhD research quantified inter-annual vegetation cover change for a protected area in Cambodia by developing a framework for harmonising data from multiple satellite sensors. Kevin jointly developed various satellite-based products as part of the Sydney node of TERN/Auscover, including the first vegetation phenology product for Australia. Kevin also lectures in Geographic Information Science and Environmental Modelling for the University of Sydney.

Dr Peter Fearns (Curtin University)
Dr. Fearns has over 18 years experience in physics and remote sensing science. His work has recently focussed on ocean colour remote sensing and in-water optical processes, reef and coastal habitat mapping, dredge plume monitoring, bush fire detection, and airborne vegetation mapping. He is a member of the Curtin University’s Remote Sensing and Satellite Research Group. The group has expertise in field-based collection of optical and biogeochemical validation data, processing and analysis of aircraft and space-based remotely sensed data, reception and management of direct broadcast data, and processing of very large data sets using High Performance Computing facilities. The group has a long history of modelling and algorithm development in atmospheric, land and ocean remote sensing. Dr. Fearns has been involved in all aspects of the Group’s research.

Dr Sarah Hamylton (University of Wollongong)
Dr Hamylton's research interests lie in spatial analysis of coastal environments. Specifically, she applies a combination of Geographical Information Systems (GIS), Remote Sensing (RS) and spatial statistics, with a focus on tropical coastal systems (e.g. reef islands, coral reefs, mangroves). Dr Hamylton develops models to further understand coastal processes at the landscape scale, including shoreline movements, wave energy conditions, the influence of sea-level rise on reef systems, the implications of ocean acidification for reef island evolution, benthic faunal patterns, carbonate sediment production and ecological and habitat dynamics of atoll environments. Dr Hamylton has worked in the Chagos Islands, Australia, Fiji, Thailand, the Philippines, the Seychelles, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Belize.

Dr Roy Hughes (DSTO)
Dr Hughes is a defence research scientist in Maritime Division of DSTO and leads the Unmanned Systems Advanced Sensors and Payloads activity within the branch. He holds several degrees which includes a B.Sc., M.Sc. and PhD in theoretical, chemical and experimental physics; applied mathematics and imaging science; and hyperspectral and imaging optics respectively. Current research includes the development and exploitation of passive and active advanced optical and electronic sensor technologies, and imaging systems for UAV and UUV platforms providing support to maritime capability. Previous research has included development of a 3-D imaging Lidar system, specialised imaging systems, a role in the development of the Australian Laser Airborne Depth Sounder (LADS) program and its subsequent evolution. Other previous research includes various surveillance systems, management of the DSTO Advanced Sensors program and enabling and disruptive technology analysis. He spent several years embedded in the Headquarters Joint Operational Command, and currently leads a joint Australian-US defence research project. He has also undertaken a DSTO long-term exchange to the USAF laboratories, and is an Australian national representative to a multinational defence committee. He holds adjunct appointments as Professor in Physics at QUT, as well as Associate Professor in Applied Mathematics at UNSW, a member of the OSA and AOS. In any spare time available, he pursues diving and fishing.

Professor Mervyn Lynch (Curtin University)
Mervyn Lynch has worked in the field of active (LIDAR) and passive remote sensing for some 40 years. Curtin University’s Remote Sensing and Satellite Research Group (RSSRG) is characterised by a quantitative approach to remote sensing; namely, remote sensing science, commencing with radiative transfer in the atmosphere and marine environments through formulation of extractive algorithms, their implementation, application and validation of derived products. Airborne hyperspectral research has been directed at shallow water remote sensing to retrieve bathymetry, benthic cover classification and water optical attenuation. The physically-based retrieval of phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) from remotely sensed observations is also of significant interest.

Dr Tim Parsons
A 20-year veteran of commercial product innovation within digital, online and IPTV around the world, Tim Parsons is now returning to his roots in aerospace via the delta-V Space Alliance, a Sydney-headquartered private sector-academic partnership comprised of Asia’s first Space startup Accelerator, and its first privately held space missions company.

Dr Chris Roelfsema (University of Queensland)
Research and lecturing in Coastal and Marine Remote Sensing at Biophysical Remote Sensing Group at University of Queensland since 1999. 1995-1998 SCUBA Diving instructor in Jamaica and Malaysia. 1993-1995 Development of Geographical Information Systems for Dutch Government. Research interest in: Pure research, to determine which biophysical properties of coral reefs and associated waters can be measured and monitored from operational and research based remote sensing systems; and Applied research, developing mapping and monitoring programs for government agencies and non- government agencies using geo-referenced field survey, remote sensing and other spatial information for monitoring ecosystem health of coral reefs & seagrass habitats. Developing field calibration and validation data collection approaches that include a variety of sources and methods: drop cameras, photo transects via snorkelers, divers or robots, or citizen science based monitoring, e.g. Coral Watch, Reef Check, Seagrass Watch. Experience throughout reefs and seagrass habitats in the Asia Pacific. Capacity building through: teaching in under and post graduate courses; citizen science groups, national and international workshops; and development of remote sensing toolkit.

Panellists

Professor Mervyn Lynch taking questions

Professor Mervyn Lynch taking questions.

Panel Discussant
Professor Mervyn Lynch (Curtin University)
Mervyn Lynch has worked in the field of active (LIDAR) and passive remote sensing for some 40 years. Curtin University’s Remote Sensing and Satellite Research Group (RSSRG) is characterised by a quantitative approach to remote sensing; namely, remote sensing science, commencing with radiative transfer in the atmosphere and marine environments through formulation of extractive algorithms, their implementation, application and validation of derived products. Airborne hyperspectral research has been directed at shallow water remote sensing to retrieve bathymetry, benthic cover classification and water optical attenuation. The physically-based retrieval of phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) from remotely sensed observations is also of significant interest.

Panellists
Professor Andrew Dempster (University of New South Wales)
Andrew Dempster's current research involves developing cubesats - the QB50 satellite, the Namuru GPS receiver for satellites, future space missions and pursuing the "Garada" Synthetic Aperture Radar Formation Flying project, originally funded under the Australian Space Research Program. His research involves all areas relevant to GPS receiver design and signal processing, including all new GNSS systems and signals, interference, multipath, and hardware optimisation. New location technologies such as Locata and WiFi. Integrated systems such as GPS/ DSRC and machinne automation.

Associate Professor Joe Khachan (The University of Sydney)
Joe Khachan is a member of the Plasma Physics Research Group at The University of Sydney. Research in Plasma Physics includes complex (dusty) plasmas, gas discharge plasmas, quantum plasmas, space and astrophysical plasmas, as well as plasma technologies.

Dr Sergio Leon-Saval (The University of Sydney)
Sergio G. Leon-Saval was awarded his PhD by the University of Bath, UK, in 2006. In October 2007 he joined the Optical Fibre Technology Centre (OFTC). In 2009, he moved to the Institute of Photonics and Optical Science (IPOS), University of Sydney, Australia. Dr Leon-Saval has more than 10 years of experience in the area of photonic devices and astrophotonics; during that time he has been involved in several breakthroughs related to multimode photonics, optical fibre technology and astronomical instrumentation. He has direct experience on the fabrication, modelling, and development of optical devices and instrumentation, understanding both the theoretical and experimental aspects. Dr Leon-Saval has co-authored over 49 international refereed journals and more than 90 conference papers since 2004 with over 2080 citations, and a h-index of 23.

Workshop Convenors

Dr Eleanor Bruce
Eleanor Bruce is the Acting Network Leader for Sydney SpaceNet, University of Sydney and is interested in bridging gaps between science, social science and policy in dealing with issues of environmental change, human resilience and sustainability through the use of Earth Observation data. She is also Coordinator of the Marine Science and Management Masters Program and Senior Lecturer in the School of Geosciences. Her research interests are in coastal management, environmental spatial analysis and modelling, biophysical coastal process response to sea level variation, landscape change detection, marine species distribution modelling and marine spatial planning.

Dr Ana Vila Concejo
Ana Vila Concejo is an Australian Future Fellow in the School of Geosciences and Director of the One Tree Island Research Station. Her research interests are in the contemporary processes and morphodynamics of coastal systems. Although she is presenting dedicating most of her time to carbonate sand she remains interested in low energy beaches, tidal inlets, overwash, coastal erosion, hazards and coastal management. She is a keen fieldworker and highly experienced in acquiring and processing hydrodynamic, topographic and bathymetric data. She also works with fluorescent tracers for studying sediment transport processes, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as a tool to analyse recent and present data and remotely sensed imagery.

Dr Richard Murphy
Richard Murphy is a Research Fellow in the Australian Centre for Field Robotics, working on remote sensing of minerals. He also collaborates with researchers in the Centre for Research on Ecological Impacts of Coastal Cities working on the ecology of epilithic biofilms. His earlier Ph.D. research on the use of imaging spectrometry to identify and map hydrothermal alteration associated with mineralisation in central and southern Spain and in Utah, USA. Using data gathered from aircraft (AVIRIS and GERIS instruments) he evaluated the effects of living and dead vegetation on our ability to map the geological substrata and developed methods to compensate for these effects. Other aspects of this work involved geobotanical mapping of various minerals in Wales by detecting spectral changes in the overlying pastureland and the development of a new technique to map silicification.

Professor Iver Cairns
Prof. Cairns is the Network Leader for Sydney SpaceNet, University of Sydney. He received his PhD from the University of Sydney (Australia) in 1987. He worked at the University of Iowa (1986-1998) before taking up a prestigious 5-year Senior Research Fellowship at the University of Sydney, one of only 20 awarded over all research fields. In 2004 he was awarded a similarly competitive Australian Professorial Fellowship and in 2009 was appointed Professor in Space Physics (Teaching & Research) at U. Sydney.

Workshop Program

Session

Details

Pre-meeting tea (8:45 – 9:00)

 

Welcome (9:00 – 9:15)

 

Morning Session 1 (9:15 – 10:45)

Kevin Davies (University of Technology) and Tommy Fellowes (University of Sydney)

“Recent advancements in satellite-based optical and active remote sensing for coastal and marine environments – brief review” (30 mins)

 

Sarah Hamylton (University of Wollongong)

“Challenges in the use of remote sensing data for mapping, monitoring and modelling coral reef environments” (30 mins)

 

Chris Roelfsema (University of Queensland)

"Challenges in measuring and monitoring biophysical properties of seagrass environments" (30 mins)

Morning Tea (10:45 – 11:00)

 

Morning Session II (11:00 – 12:30)

Peter Fearns (Curtin University)

“Remote sensing to support monitoring of dredge activities” (30 mins)

 

Mervyn Lynch (Curtin University)

"Coastal hyperspectral remote sensing applications" (30 mins)

 

Roy Hughes (DSTO)

“Sensors for UAV based Coastal Remote Sensing” (30 mins)

Lunch (12:30 – 13:15)

 

Talk (13:15 – 13:45)

Tim Parsons – “Why cubesats and what potential?”

Panel Discussion (13:45 – 14:30)

Panel Discussant: Professor Mervyn Lynch (Curtin University)

Panellists: Andrew Dempster (University of New South Wales), Joe Khachan (University of Sydney), Sergio Leon-Saval (University of Sydney) – “Cubesats opportunities for coastal EOS”

Afternoon tea (14:30-14:45)

 

Focus group (14:45-16:30)

Review of key data requirements, processing methods and instrument design opportunities

Workshop drinks (16:30-17:30)