Undergraduate Intermediate

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Our second year biology units are designed to give you an integrated understanding of the diversity and function of plants and animals and how they function from the level of the cell through to populations and ecological communities. You will also learn how to design biological experiments and analyse the results. With this comprehensive grounding in biology, you will be prepared to take on the more specialised third year biology units. Fieldwork units in marine and terrestrial environments are also available to biology students.

Standard units

Semester 1

BIOL2016 Cell Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Murray Thomson. Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12cp of Junior BIOL; or 6cp of Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901); or (6cp of Junior Biology and 6cp of Junior Chemistry). Prohibitions: BIOL2916; all intermediate BMED units Assumed knowledge: BIOL1001 Assessment: One 3-hour theory exam, 1 project assignment, 1 practical report (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: This unit is not available to students in BMedSc.

An image of peroxisomes

This unit of study focuses on contemporary principles in cell biology and development in plants and animals, with emphasis on cellular functions and a focus on the molecular perspective, fundamental to understanding biological organisms. Topics include cancer and control of cell division and migration, pre-programmed cell death, molecular signalling and transport systems, cellular endocrinology and embryonic development. The practical component provides students with hands-on training in key research techniques using modern equipment. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.

Textbooks

Alberts B, Johnson A, Lewis J, Raff M, Roberts K, Walter P. 2007. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th Edition. Garland Science.

BIOL2916 Cell Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Murray Thomson. Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across either 12cp of Junior Biology, or 6cp of Junior Biology and (MBLG1001 or MBLG901), or 6cp of Junior Biology and 6cp of Junior Chemistry. Prohibitions: BIOL2016, all intermediate BMED units Assumed knowledge: BIOL1001 Assessment: One 3-hour exam, 1 practical report, 1 project assignment (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: This unit is not available to students in BMedSc.

The content of BIOL2916 will be based on BIOL2016 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.

Textbooks

As for BIOL2016

BIOL2023 Botany

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosanne Quinnell, A/Prof. Murray Henwood Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures, one tutorial and one 2- to 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 6cp Junior BIOL and 6cp Junior Sciences Prohibitions: BIOL2923, PLNT2003, PLNT2903, PLNT2002, PLNT2902, BIOL2003, BIOL2903, BIOL2004,BIOL2904 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1001 OR BIOL1002 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), anatomy project (20%), quizzes (10%), one 2-hour practical exam (30%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Students planning to major in Biology or Plant Sciences are encouraged to complete (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) before enrolling in this unit.

A photo a student in a greenhouse

This unit of study focuses on the remarkable world of plants and recent advances in botanical research. A phylogenetic approach provides the systematic foundation to this unit and is fundamental to biology. Students are introduced to large-scale patterns in plant morphology and distribution (biogeography). At a different scale, this unit of study investigates the structure of cells, tissues and organs of flowering plants and addresses how plants are constructed and how they respond to environmental signals (incl. stress responses). There is a focus on recent advances in botanical research. Students will develop skills in phylogenetic inference, plant identification and plant anatomy. The content is well-suited to students with specific interests in botany, broad interests in biology (ecology, bioinformatics, environmental science, molecular and cell biology, genetics and biotechnology) and broader disciplines (e.g. education, arts, and environmental law). This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.

Textbooks

Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman & Co Publishers. New York. NY. A Study Guide for the unit will be available for purchase from the Copy Centre during the first week of semester, a .pdf copy of which will be available for download from the LMS.

BIOL2923 Botany (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosanne Quinnell, A/Prof. Murray Henwood Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures, one tutorial and one 2- to 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average in at least 6 credit points of Junior Biology units of study and 6 credit points Junior Sciences. Prohibitions: BIOL2023, PLNT2003, PLNT2903, PLNT2002, PLNT2902, BIOL2003, BIOL2903, BIOL2004, BIOL2904 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1001 OR BIOL1002 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), one 2-hour practical exam (30%), research project (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Students planning to major in Biology or Plant Sciences are encouraged to complete (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) before enrolling in this unit.

The content of BIOL2923 will be based on BIOL2023 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.

Textbooks

Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman & Co Publishers. New York. NY. A Study Guide for the unit will be available for purchase from the Copy Centre during the first week of semester, a .pdf copy of which will be available for download from the LMS.

BIOL2021 Zoology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Seebacher Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). Prohibitions: BIOL2011, BIOL2911, BIOL2012, BIOL2912, BIOL2921 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam (50%), Lab book (15%), Invertebrate Collection (20%), Oral presentation (15%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

A photo of a marsupial

This unit of study provides an overview of the functional and phylogenetic diversity of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. The material is presented within the conceptual framework of evolution, the foundation of biology. Lectures explore the diversity of major functional systems and behaviour in the context of environmental challenges and the ecological roles of different animal groups. Laboratory classes include dissections and demonstrations of the functional anatomy of invertebrates and vertebrates, as well as experiments. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.

Textbooks

Recommended reading: Hickman CP, Roberts LS, Larson A, l'Anson H 2004. Integrated Principles of Zoology, 12th ed. McGraw Hill, NY. Withers, P. 1992 Comparative Animal Physiology. Saunders, New York

BIOL2921 Zoology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Seebacher Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). These requirements may be varied and students with lower averages should consult the Unit Coordinator. Prohibitions: BIOL2011, BIOL2911, BIOL2012, BIOL2912, BIOL2021 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam (50%), Lab book (15%), Invertebrate Collection (20%), Oral presentation (15%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

The content of BIOL2921 will be based on BIOL2021 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.

Textbooks

Recommended reading: Hickman CP, Roberts LS, Larson A, l'Anson H 2004. Integrated Principles of Zoology, 12th ed. McGraw Hill, NY. Withers, P. 1992 Comparative Animal Physiology. Saunders, New York

Semester 2

BIOL2024 Ecology and Conservation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Banks Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). Prohibitions: BIOL2924 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (50%), one 2-hour exam (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

A photo of a beach

This unit of study examines the ecological principles driving the major ecosystems of the world and ecological processes behind the world's major conservation issues. It aims to develop in students the core foundations for an understanding of Ecology and its application in conservation. Lectures will focus on the ecology of the major terrestrial and marine biomes of the world. Application of ecological theory and methods to practical conservation problems will be integrated throughout the unit of study.

Practical sessions will provide hands-on experience in ecological sampling and data handling to understand the ecology of marine and terrestrial environments, as well as ecological simulations to understand processes. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.

Textbooks

Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 3rd edition (2008). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John Wiley & Sons
Recommended:
The Ecological World View (2010) Krebs, CJ; CSIRO Publishing

BIOL2924 Ecology and Conservation (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Banks Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). These requirements may be varied and students with lower averages should consult the Unit Coordinator. Prohibitions: BIOL2024 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (50%), one 2-hour exam (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

A photo of a seal on rocks

The content of BIOL2924 will be based on BIOL2024 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.

Textbooks

Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 3rd edition (2008). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John Wiley & Sons
Recommended:
The Ecological World View (2010) Krebs, CJ; CSIRO Publishing

BIOL2022 Biology Experimental Design & Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clare McArthur Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). Prohibitions: BIOL3006, BIOL3906, BIOL2922 Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

A photo of a student in the lab

This unit considers how biology is practiced as a quantitative, experimental and theoretical science. It focuses on the underlying principles and practical skills required to explore questions and test hypotheses, particularly where background variation (error) is inherently high. In so doing, it provides an understanding of how biological research is designed, analysed and interpreted using statistics.

Lectures focus on sound experimental and statistical principles, using examples in biology to demonstrate concepts. In the practical sessions, students design and perform, analyse (using appropriate statistical tools) and interpret their own experiments to answer research questions in topics relevant to each student's particular interest. The unit provides foundational skills essential for doing research in biology and for critically judging the research of others. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.

Textbooks

Required: Ruxton, G. and Colegrave, N. 2010. Experimental design for the life sciences. 3rd Ed. Oxford University Press
Recommended: Quinn, G. P. and M. J. Keough. 2002. Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Biologists. 1st Ed. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Recommended: Field, A. 2009. Discovering statistics using SPSS. 3rd Ed. SAGE Publications, London.

BIOL2922 Biology Experimental Design & Analysis (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clare McArthur Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). These requirements may be varied and students with lower averages should consult the Unit Coordinator. Prohibitions: BIOL3006, BIOL3906, BIOL2022 Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

The content of BIOL2922 will be based on BIOL2022 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.

Textbooks

Required: Ruxton, G. and Colegrave, N. 2010. Experimental design for the life sciences. 3rd Ed. Oxford University Press
Recommended: Quinn, G. P. and Keough, 2002. Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Biologists.1st Ed. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Recommended: Field, A. 2009. Discovering statistics using SPSS. 3rd Ed. SAGE Publications, London.

MBLG2072 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Penny Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 2-3 hour practical per week, one tutorial every second week. Prerequisites: 6cp of Junior Biology and (one of MBLG1001 and MBLG1901) and 6cp of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: 12cp of Junior Chemistry Assessment: One 2 hour exam (50%), laboratory reports and quizzes (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: For students planning a Molecular Biology and Genetics major, 12cp of Junior Chemistry is required.

A photo of a student looking at a slide

This unit of study brings together traditional genetic analysis and modern molecular biology to study genetics of all life forms from humans and other complex multicellular organisms through to single celled organisms such as bacteria. Students will be introduced to complex modes of Mendelian inheritance, including those involved in human diseases. The molecular basis for different patterns of inheritance will be discussed. The interaction of genes and gene products will be illustrated by the examination of the molecular genetics of development. The application of genomics to the study of genetic variation, molecular evolution and gene function in humans and model organisms will also be described.

In the practical sessions students will investigate the genetics of a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in order to illustrate concepts covered in the lecture material. Students will develop familiarity and competence with equipment used in molecular genetic analysis, bioinformatics, microscopy and statistical tests. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study, which can lead to a major in Biology, and successful completion of this unit of study is required in order to progress in the Molecular Biology and Genetics major.

MBLG2972 Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Penny Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 2-3 hour practical per week, one tutorial every second week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across 6cp of Junior Biology, 6cp of (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 6cp of Junior Chemistry. Prohibitions: MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: 12cp of Junior Chemistry Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), laboratory reports and quizzes (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: For students planning for a Molecular Biology and Genetics major, 12cp of Junior Chemistry is required.

The content of MBLG2972 will be based on MBLG2072 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.

Fieldwork units

Odd years (2013, 2015...)

BIOL2010 Introduction to Tropical Wildlife Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr M Greenlees, Prof. R Shine Session: Int February Classes: One week intensive field trip plus one week intensive lecture and prac session. Prerequisites: 12cp Junior BIOL; OR 6cp Junior BIOL and 6cp MBLG1001/1901 Prohibitions: BIOL2910, BIOL3010, BIOL3910 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 Assessment: Practical exam (15%), Presentation (15%), Reports (30%), Theory exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Field Experience

Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study, based on placement availability and merit. The unit is only available in ODD years (2013, 2015..) but students may apply for entry into an alternative Intermediate field unit in EVEN years.

Australia has a unique terrestrial vertebrate fauna. Because of Australia's unusual climate, landforms, and the rarity of many species, the management of our native wildlife presents special challenges for biologists, conservationists and land managers. This unit of study addresses the biogeography, ecology and management of Australia's terrestrial fauna, with a focus on the wet-dry tropical savannah woodlands. It comprises a one-week field trip at Mary River Park in the Northern Territory plus one week intensive lecture and prac session. The unit of study will provide students with an exciting, hands-on first experience of terrestrial field ecology. During the trip, students will learn how to carry out fauna surveys, how to identify animals, and how to track wildlife. Biologists working on a range of environmental issues in wet-dry tropical woodlands will present guest lectures to students during the field trip. Students will travel to other locations including Litchfield National Park on the last day to introduce them to the various habitats occurring in the Top End.

More information

Please download the info booklet (pdf) for more information.

BIOL2910 Introduction to Tropical Wildlife Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr M Greenlees Session: Int February Classes: One week intensive field trip plus one week intensive lecture and prac session. Prerequisites: 12cp Junior BIOL; OR 6cp Junior BIOL and 6cp MBLG1001/1901; with Distinction average. These requirements may be varied and students with lower averages should consult the Unit Coordinator. Prohibitions: BIOL2010, BIOL3010, BIOL3910. Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 Assessment: Practical exam (15%), Presentation (15%), Reports (30%), Theory exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Field Experience

Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study, based on placement availability and merit. The unit is only available in ODD years (2013, 2015..) but students may apply for entry into an alternative Intermediate field unit in EVEN years.

The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL2021 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. Australia has a unique terrestrial vertebrate fauna. Because of Australia's unusual climate, landforms, and the rarity of many species, the management of our native wildlife presents special challenges for biologists, conservationists and land managers. This unit of study addresses the biogeography, ecology and management of Australia's terrestrial fauna, with a focus on the wet-dry tropical savannah woodlands. It comprises a one-week field trip at Mary River Park in the Northern Territory plus one week intensive lecture and prac session. The unit of study will provide students with an exciting, hands-on first experience of terrestrial field ecology. During the trip, students will learn how to carry out fauna surveys, how to identify animals, and how to track wildlife. Biologists working on a range of environmental issues in wet-dry tropical woodlands will present guest lectures to students during the field trip. Students will travel to other locations including Litchfield National Park on the last day to introduce them to the various habitats occurring in the Top End.

More information

Please download the info booklet (pdf) for more information.

BIOL2028 Introduction to Marine Field Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman Session: Int July Classes: 7 day intensive field course Prerequisites: 12cp Junior BIOL; OR 6cp Junior BIOL and 6cp MBLG1001/1901 Prohibitions: BIOL2928, BIOL3008, BIOL3908. Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 and 12 cp of Intermediate Biology Assessment: In-class test on Biodiversity (30%), Descriptive reports of sampling methodologies appropriate to different organisms (20%), Practical reports/presentations (40%), Record keeping and participation (10%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Field Experience

Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study, based on placement availability and merit. The unit is only available in ODD years (2013, 2015..) but students may apply for entry into an alternative Intermediate field unit in EVEN years.

A photo of students sieving at a beach

This field course provides a practical introduction to the experimental ecology of marine organisms. Students will take part in directed experimental projects focused on logical structures in the experimental study of marine organisms and problems of analysis of data. The ethos of the unit is to encourage students to develop their logical approach to the testing of hypotheses in marine ecology, by critically testing hypotheses on the distribution and behaviour or marine organisms. Emphasis will be given to enhancing practical skills in experimental field ecology and placing empirical observations in a logical structure.

No particular mathematical or statistical skills are required. Critical thinking, logical structures, numeracy and effective communication and other generic skills are emphasised. The unit is well suited to students with interests in marine science and ecology and will be an excellent foundation for any further units aimed at understanding whole organisms in the natural settings.

Textbooks

Recommended: Kingsford M, Battershill C (1998) Studying Marine Temperate Environments: A Handbook for Ecologists. Christchurch: Canterbury University Press. 335 p.

BIOL2928 Introduction to Marine Field Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman Session: Int July Classes: 7 day intensive field course Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12cp Junior BIOL; OR 6cp Junior BIOL and 6cp MBLG1001/1901. These requirements may be varied and students with lower averages should consult the Unit Coordinator. Prohibitions: BIOL2028, BIOL3008, BIOL3908. Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 and 12 cp of Intermediate Biology Assessment: In-class test on Biodiversity (30%), Review of a research paper (20%), Practical reports/presentations (40%), Record keeping and participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Field Experience

Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study, based on placement availability and merit. The unit is only available in ODD years (2013, 2015..) but students may apply for entry into an alternative Intermediate field unit in EVEN years.

A photo of a diver

The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL2028 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. This field course provides a practical introduction to the experimental ecology of marine organisms. Students will take part in directed experimental projects focused on logical structures in the experimental study of marine organisms and problems of analysis of data. The ethos of the unit is to encourage students to develop their logical approach to the testing of hypotheses in marine ecology, by critically testing hypotheses on the distribution and behaviour or marine organisms. Emphasis will be given to enhancing practical skills in experimental field ecology and placing empirical observations in a logical structure.

No particular mathematical or statistical skills are required. Critical thinking, logical structures, numeracy and effective communication and other generic skills are emphasised. The unit is well suited to students with interests in marine science and ecology and will be an excellent foundation for any further units aimed at understanding whole organisms in the natural settings.

Textbooks

Recommended: Kingsford M, Battershill C (1998) Studying Marine Temperate Environments: A Handbook for Ecologists. Christchurch: Canterbury University Press. 335 p.

Even years (2014, 2016…)

BIOL2009 Introduction to Terrestrial Field Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Glenda Wardle Session: Int July Classes: Intensive, 6-day field course (July 20-July 25 inclusive); 4 practical classes held in weeks 1-4 of semester 2; introductory lecture in last week of semester 1. Prerequisites: 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) Prohibitions: BIOL2909, BIOL3009, BIOL3909. Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 and 12 credit points of Intermediate Biology Assessment: Two in-class quizzes (20%), Major research report (40%), Sampling project report (20%), Research proposal and presentation (10%), Data collection and analysis in teams (10%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Field Experience

Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any intermediate BIOL units of study may also be considered. The unit is only available in EVEN years (2014, 2016), but students may apply for entry into an alternative intermediate field unit in ODD years.

This field course provides a practical introduction in the experimental analysis of terrestrial populations and assemblages. The experience is best suited to students who will continue into senior units of study in ecology. Students learn a broad range of ecological sampling techniques and develop a detailed understanding of the logical requirements necessary for manipulative ecological field experiments.

The field work incorporates survey techniques for plants, small mammals and other fauna and thus provides a good background for ecological consulting work. Students attend a week-long field course and participate in a large-scale research project as part of a large team, as well as conducting a research project that they design with a small group of students. Invited experts contribute to the lectures and discussions on issues relating to the ecology, conservation and management of Australia's terrestrial flora and fauna.

This unit will be available in EVEN years (2014, 2016...) only. You may take an alternative field unit of study when this unit is unavailable. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit, based on placement availability and merit. Contact the School of Biological Sciences Office for the Special Permission form to request enrolment.

BIOL2909 Introduction to Terrestrial Field Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Glenda Wardle Session: Int July Classes: Note: One 6-day field trip held in the pre-semester break (July 20- July 25 inclusive) and four 4-hour practical classes during weeks 1-4 of semester 2. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). Prohibitions: BIOL2009, BIOL3009, BIOL3909 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 and 12 credit points of Intermediate Biology Assessment: Discussions and quiz (10%), research project proposal and brief presentation (10%), sampling project report (20%), specimen collection (10%), research project report (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Field Experience

Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any intermediate BIOL units of study may also be considered. The unit is only available in EVEN years (2014, 2016), but students may apply for entry into an alternative intermediate field unit in ODD years.

This unit has the same objectives as BIOL2009 Terrestrial Field Ecology, and is suitable for qualified students who wish to pursue certain aspects at a more advanced level. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study will participate in alternatives to some elements of the standard course and will be required to pursue the objectives by more independent means. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students at the beginning of the unit. This field course provides a practical introduction in the experimental analysis of terrestrial populations and assemblages. The experience is best suited to students who will continue into senior units of study in ecology. Students learn a broad range of ecological sampling techniques and develop a detailed understanding of the logical requirements necessary for manipulative ecological field experiments.

The field work incorporates survey techniques for plants, small mammals and other fauna and thus provides a good background for ecological consulting work. Students attend a week-long field course and participate in a large-scale research project as part of a large team as well as conducting a research project that they design with a small group of students. Invited experts contribute to the lectures and discussions on issues relating to the ecology, conservation and management of Australia's terrestrial flora and fauna.

This unit will be available in EVEN years (2014, 2016...) only. You may take an alternative field unit of study when this unit is unavailable. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit, based on placement availability and merit. Contact the School of Biological Sciences Office for the Special Permission form to request enrolment.

BIOL2020 Introduction to Coral Reef Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Maria Byrne Session: Int July Classes: 7-day intensive field course ( 21- 27 July) Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Junior BIOL; or 6 credit points of Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). Prohibitions: BIOL2920, BIOL3016, BIOL3916 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 and 12 credit points of Intermediate Biology Assessment: Two 1000-word essays (2x10%), one 2000-word field report (40%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Field Experience

Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Intermediate BIOL units of study may also be considered. This unit is only available in EVEN numbered years (e.g. 2014, 2016...), but students are offered alternative intermediate field units in ODD numbered years.

This unit covers the key biological organisms and processes in coral reef environments and linkages between them. Emphasis is given to corals, other reef associated invertebrates (e.g. echinoderms), plankton and fishes. Ecological and physiological aspects of key organisms are explored. Aspects covered include oceanography, biogeography, distribution of corals, coral bleaching and health, symbioses, the input of plankton to reefs, the role of fishes and invertebrate bio-eroders in reef environments, and impacts of environmental change on coral reef health. The unit is well suited to students with interests in marine science and ecology, environmental sciences and broader disciplines (e.g. education, arts, and environmental law).

This unit will be available in EVEN years (2014, 2016...) only. You may take an alternative field unit of study when this unit is unavailable. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit, based on placement availability and merit. Contact the School of Biological Sciences Office for the Special Permission form to request enrolment.

Textbooks

Hutchings PA, O. Hoegh-Guldberg and M. J. Kingsford (eds) 2008 The Great Barrier Reef, Biology, Environment and Management. CSIRO Press. Hopley 2011 Encyclopedia of Modern Coral Reefs. Springer.

BIOL2920 Introduction to Coral Reef Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Maria Byrne Session: Int July Classes: 7-day intensive field course (21- 27 July) Prerequisites: Distinction average across either 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). Prohibitions: BIOL2020, BIOL3016, BIOL3916 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 and 12 credit points of Intermediate Biology Assessment: Two 1000-word essays (2x10%), one 2000-word field report designed specifically for the Advanced stream (40%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Field Experience

Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any intermediate BIOL units of study may also be considered. The unit is only available in EVEN years (2014, 2016), but students may apply for entry into an alternative Intermediate field unit in ODD years.

The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL2020 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. This unit covers the key biological organisms and processes in coral reef environments and linkages between them. Emphasis is given to corals, other reef associated invertebrates (e.g. echinoderms), plankton and fishes. Ecological and physiological aspects of key organisms are explored. Aspects covered include oceanography, biogeography, distribution of corals, coral bleaching and health, symbioses, the input of plankton to reefs, the role of fishes and invertebrate bio-eroders in reef environments, and impacts of environmental change on coral reef health. The unit is well suited to students with interests in marine science and ecology, environmental sciences and broader disciplines (e.g. education, arts, and environmental law).

This unit will be available in EVEN years (2014, 2016...) only. You may take an alternative field unit of study when this unit is unavailable. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit, based on placement availability and merit. Contact the School of Biological Sciences Office for the Special Permission form to request enrolment.

Textbooks

Hutchings PA, O. Hoegh-Guldberg and M. J. Kingsford (eds) 2008 The Great Barrier Reef, Biology, Environment and Management. CSIRO Press. Hopley 2011 Encyclopedia of Modern Coral Reefs. Springer.