Junior Undergraduate Studies

Undergraduate Junior

Apply now »

Future Students and Current Students 1800 SYD UNI (793 864)

Make an Enquiry Future Students

Make an Enquiry Current Students



Related information: Download the information booklet (pdf), Student Volunteers | Questions: Contact & find us

In First Year Biology we introduce you to modern biology and how biologists carry out scientific investigation. Topics range from genes and DNA, to understanding the human body, to theories of evolution. There are many reasons why you may want to study biology. It could be an excitement in the growing field of biotechnology, a desire to conserve the environment, a love of animals, or just a curiosity in life itself. If you haven’t done HSC biology or just want a refresher, we offer Bridging Courses in biology every year before semester one of First Year Biology. Courses last for one week and are for prospective students of all ages and abilities.

Units of Study

Semester 1

BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures, online material and 1x3hr practical per week. Unit Coordinator: A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Prohibitions: BIOL1911, BIOL1991. Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Practical ePortfolio (10%), During semester exams (20%), Communication (30%),Summative final exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington. Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Students should attempt no more than two of the three Junior BIOL units of study; thus this unit can be taken with BIOL1002/1902 OR BIOL1003/1903/1993.

A photo of an ant in a flower

Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. This unit will explore how new species, diseases and parasites continue to arise while others go extinct and discuss the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It will also explain how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, trasnformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes integrating Life and Evolution concepts. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems and organisms into what they are today.

Textbooks

Please see unit outline on LMS.

BIOL1906 Life and Evolution – Advanced

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Classes: 2x1 hr lectures and 1 x3 hr practical per week and tutorials every few weeks. Prerequisites: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Prohibitions: BIOL1001, BIOL1991. Assessment: Practical ePortfolio (10%), During semester exams (20%), Communication (30%),Summative final exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day.

Note: Students should attempt no more than two of the three Junior BIOL units of study

A photo of Quolls

Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. This unit will explore how new species, diseases and parasites continue to arise while others go extinct and discuss the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It will also explain how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, trasnformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in alternative components. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.

Textbooks

Please see unit outline on LMS.

BIOL1996 Life and Evolution – Special Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 A/Prof Nathan Lo Classes: 2x1 hr lectures and 30-36 hours of practicals Prerequisites: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Prohibitions: BIOL1001, BIOL1991. Assessment: Practical (comprised of two practical reports, Laboratory note book and Seminar presentation) Total (60%),40% final summative exam as per BIOL1906. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day.

Note: Students should attempt no more than two of the three Junior BIOL units of study

Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different to BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project based laboratory.

Textbooks

Please see unit outline on LMS.

BIOL1003 Human Biology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Unit Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Classes: 2x1 hr lectures/week (3 lectures in some weeks), 1x3 hr practical class/fortnight, 1x2hr workshop/fortnight, 6-9 hrs HBOnline work/fortnight covering online practical activities, prework and homework. Prohibitions: BIOL1903, BIOL1993. Assumed knowledge: HSC 2-unit Biology. Semester 1 students who have not completed HSC biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (in February). Assessment: 1x2 hr exam, assignments and tests (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Students should attempt no more than two of the three Junior BIOL units of study; thus this unit can be taken with BIOL1002/1902 OR BIOL1001/1911/1991.

A photo of a Human Biology lab session

This unit of study provides an introduction to human anatomy and physiology. It includes an overview of cell and tissue structures, the skeletal system, nutrition, digestion and excretion. Human Biology looks at how our bodies respond to environmental stimuli with respect to the endocrine, nervous and immune systems. After discussion of reproduction and development, it concludes with an overview of modern studies in human genetics. This unit has four main components: lectures, practicals, workshops and HB Online activities; this unit of study provides a suitable foundation for intermediate biology units of study.

Textbooks

Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (2013) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill. The edition comes with a custom publication of: Mader, S.S. (2006) Human Biology, 11th edition, McGraw Hill. (Chapters 19, 24, 26)

BIOL1903 Human Biology – Advanced

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Unit Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Classes: 2x1 hr lectures/week (3 lectures in some weeks), 1x3 hr practical class/fortnight, 1x2 hr workshop/fortnight, 6-9 hours HBOnline work/fortnight covering online practical activities, prework and homework. Prerequisites: HSC Biology result in the 90+, OR Distinction or better in a University level Biology unit OR an ATAR equal to 95 or greater Prohibitions: BIOL1003, BIOL1993. Assessment: 1x2 hr exam, assignment, group project presentation, discussion activities and tests (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Students should attempt no more than two of the three Junior BIOL units of study; thus this unit can be taken with BIOL1002/1902 OR BIOL1001/1911/1991.

This unit of study is the same as BIOL1003 except it includes a special lecture series with guest speakers from different scientific fields. The speakers present their research and a personal perspective of career paths into scientific research. The Independent Project encourages students to find out more about a human biology related topic that interests them.

Textbooks

As for BIOL1003

BIOL1993 Human Biology – Special Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinators: Prof Simon Ho, A/Prof Nate Lo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures and tutorial: as per BIOL1903; Practicals: 1x3-hour prac per week Prerequisites: ATAR of at least 99.0 OR a Band 6 result in Biology HSC OR medalist in International Biology Olympiad Prohibitions: BIOL1003, BIOL1903,BIOL1991 Assessment: Assessments not related to the practical sessions are identical to BIOL1903 (non-practical assessments: 40% of total Unit of Study mark). Assessments related to the practical sessions (60% of total Unit of Study mark): Two practical reports (first report: 30% of total practical mark; second report: 50% of total practical mark), Laboratory note book (5% of total practical mark), Seminar presentation (15% of total practical mark) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment.

Entry to Special Studies Program in Human Biology is restricted to students who have done exceptionally well in their HSC and/or have shown extraordinary aptitude in Biology. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1993 is very different from that of BIOL1903 (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for BIOL1903 (Advanced).

Textbooks

Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (2013) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill. The edition comes with a custom publication of: Mader, S.S. (2006) Human Biology, 11th edition, McGraw Hill. (Chapters 19, 24, 26)

Semester 2

BIOL1002 Living Systems (Semester 2, 2016)

Credit points: 6 Unit Coordinator: Dr. Matthew Pye Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures and 1x3 hr practical per week and tutorials every few weeks. Prohibitions: BIOL1902 Assumed knowledge: HSC 2-unit Biology. Students who have not completed HSC biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (in February). Assessment: 1x2 hr exam, assignments, quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown /Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Note: Students should attempt no more than two of the three Junior BIOL units of study; thus this unit can be taken with BIOL1001/1911/1991 OR BIOL1003/1903/1993.

A photo of kookaburras

Living Systems deals with the biology of organisms as individuals, within populations and as part of communities and ecosystems. A broad range of taxa is presented, from bacteria to large plants and animals, and emphasis is placed upon understanding the ways in which they can live in different habitats. Behaviour is discussed as a key process linking organismal-level processes to population and community dynamics. The importance of energy in living systems, and how elements are used and recycled in biological communities, are introduced as the basis of ecosystems. The unit of study includes lectures and laboratory classes on the physiology and behaviour of animals and plants, the ways in which organisms control and integrate their activities and the processes controlling dynamics of populations and community. These themes are revisited within applied contexts to discuss issues such as management and conservation.

Textbooks

Knox R B et al. Biology. An Australian Focus. 4th ed. McGraw-Hill. 2010.

BIOL1902 Living Systems – Advanced (Semester 2, 2016)

Credit points: 6 Unit Coordinator: Dr. Matthew Pye Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures and 1x3 hr practical per week and tutorials every few weeks. Prerequisites: Distinction or better in the BIOL1001/1911/1991 or BIOL1003/1903/1993 OR HSC Biology equal to 90 or greater OR an ATAR equal to 95 or greater Prohibitions: BIOL1002 Assessment: 1x2 hr exam, assignments, quizzes, independent project (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day.

Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Note: Students should attempt no more than two of the three Junior BIOL units of study; thus this unit can be taken with BIOL1001/1911/1991 OR BIOL1003/1903/1993.

This unit of study will cover generally the same topics as BIOL1002 but material will be discussed in greater detail. Roughly 50% of the material in lectures and practicals will be different from BIOL1002. Students enrolled in BIOL1902 will have separate lectures and practical sessions from BIOL1002.

Textbooks

As for BIOL1002.

BIOL1992 Living Systems – Special Studies (Semester 2, 2016)

Credit points: 6 Unit Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures, fieldwork and 1x2.5 hr practical per week (including project work) Prerequisites: 90+ in HSC biology (or equivalent), or ATAR of 99 or above, or medallist in International Biology Olympiad, or exceptional performance in relevant units of study. Prohibitions: BIOL1002, BIOL1902 Assumed knowledge: none. Assessment: one 2-hour exam (38%), week 6 and 10 tests (20%), lab notebook and summary (12%), quizzes (10%), independent project (20%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day.

Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Note: Students should attempt no more than two of the three Junior BIOL units of study; thus this unit can be taken with BIOL1001/1911/1991 OR BIOL1003/1903/1993.

The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as Living Systems (Advanced), but the practical work differs. The practical work includes project-based research exercises under the direct supervision of academics - an exciting leap straight into science research labs. Entry to the Special Studies Program in Living Systems is restricted to students who have done exceptionally well in their HSC and/or have shown extraordinary aptitude in Biology.

Textbooks
Knox R B et al. Biology. An Australian Focus. 4th ed. McGraw-Hill. 2010.

Aims
The aim of the special studies program in living systems is to offer students who have done exceptionally well in their HSC and/or have shown extraordinary aptitude in Biology the opportunity to extend their understanding of a) current controversies and advances in biology and b) the research processes driving these. It is geared towards students considering pursuing independent research in later years and offers the opportunity to engage with how research is done, as well as gain a deeper understanding of how biological knowledge is derived from fundamental research.

The special research-based exercises under the direct supervision of academics are driven by a series of tutorials exposing students to research in action, focussing on how innovative research is changing how we think about biology and the world around us.

Content and timing
The course uses the fundamental material presented in the advanced course (BIOL1902) and follows the timetable for this unit of study, as well as sharing the assessment structures. Tutorials in addition to BIOL1902 are run in sessions timetabled from 1-2 on Fridays when other sessions, optional lectures in weeks 2-4 and tests in weeks 6 and 10, do not use this time slot.

Philosophy
Biology is typically taught as content-rich subject in schools and introductory first year course. This contrasts with of concept-driven approaches and exploring what we don’t know. The latter are our bread and butter as researchers and introducing you to research-driven elements based around current understandings of controversies in biology is central to developing a deeper understanding of the natural world. This is essentially a guide to starting to learn what’s not in the text book.

MBLG1001 Molecular Biology and Genetics – Intro (Semester 2, 2016)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 1-hour tutorial and one 4-hour practical per fortnight Prohibitions: AGCH2001, BCHM2001, BCHM2101, BCHM2901, MBLG2101, MBLG2901, MBLG2001, MBLG2111, MBLG2771, MBLG2871, MBLG1901 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Junior Biology and 6 cp of Junior Chemistry Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, in-semester skills test and assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

A photo of a student in the lab

The lectures in this unit of study introduce the "Central Dogma" of molecular biology and genetics -i.e., the molecular basis of life. The course begins with the information macromolecules in living cells: DNA, RNA and protein, and explores how their structures allow them to fulfill their various biological roles. This is followed by a review of how DNA is organised into genes leading to discussion of replication and gene expression (transcription and translation). The unit concludes with an introduction to the techniques of molecular biology and, in particular, how these techniques have led to an explosion of interest and research in Molecular Biology. The practical component complements the lectures by exposing students to experiments which explore the measurement of enzyme activity, the isolation of DNA and the 'cutting' of DNA using restriction enzymes. However, a key aim of the practicals is to give students higher level generic skills in computing, communication, criticism, data analysis/ evaluation and experimental design.

MBLG1901 Molecular Biology and Genetics – Advanced (Semester 2, 2016)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 1-hour tutorial and one 4-hour practical per fortnight; four 1-hour seminars per semester. Prerequisites: UAI (or ATAR equivalent) of 95 or minimum Band 5 in HSC chemistry and biology or by invitation Prohibitions: AGCH2001, BCHM2001, BCHM2101, BCHM2901, MBLG2101, MBLG2901, MBLG2001, MBLG2111, MBLG2771, MBLG2871, MBLG1001 Assumed knowledge: HSC Chemistry and Biology OR 6 credit points of Junior Biology and 6 cp of Junior Chemistry Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, in-semester skills test and assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

The lectures in this unit of study introduce the "Central Dogma" of molecular biology and genetics, i.e., the molecular basis of life. The course begins with the information macro-molecules in living cells: DNA,RNA and protein, and explores how their structures allow them to fulfill their various biological roles. This is followed by a review of how DNA is organised into genes leading to discussion of replication and gene expression (transcription and translation). The unit concludes with an introduction to the techniques of molecular biology and, in particular, how these techniques have led to an explosion of interest and research in Molecular Biology. The practical component complements the lectures by exposing students to experiments which explore the measurement of enzyme activity, the isolation of DNA and the 'cutting' of DNA using restriction enzymes. However,a key aim of the practicals is to give students higher level generic skills in computing, communication, criticism, data analysis/evaluation and experimental design. The advanced component is designed for students interested in continuing in molecular biology. It consists of 7 advanced lectures (replacing 7 regular lectures) and 3 advanced laboratory sessions (replacing 3 regular practical classes). The advanced lectures will focus on the experiments which led to key discoveries in molecular biology. The advanced practical sessions will give students the opportunity to explore alternative molecular biology experimental techniques. A ttendance at MBLG1999 seminars is strongly encouraged.

Textbooks

Introduction to Molecular Biology MBLG1001 & MBLG1901, 2nd edition compiled by D. Hancock, G. Denyer and B. Lyon

MBLG1991 Molecular Biology and Genetics – Special Studies (Semester 2, 2016)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 1-hour tutorial and one 4-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: By invitation based on ATAR of 99 or above and 90+ in HSC chemistry or biology (or equivalent) Prohibitions: MBLG1001, MBLG1901 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of junior biology and 6 credit points of junior chemistry Assumed knowledge: HSC Chemistry and Biology OR 6 credit points of Junior Biology and 6 cp of Junior Chemistry Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (60%), project report and presentation (15%), assignments (10%), practical test (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

The same theory content will be covered as in the Advanced stream (MBLG1901) but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating the properties of genetically engineered organisms. This unit of study will give students experience in using molecular biology approaches to solve current environmental and medical problems. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis/evaluation and experimental design.

Textbooks
Introduction to Molecular Biology MBLG1001 & MBLG1901, 2nd edition compiled by D. Hancock, G. Denyer and B. Lyon

Organisation
Students in the SSP attend the same lectures as the advanced students but undertake a separate laboratory program. This program of five unique 4 h laboratory sessions characterizes selected genetically engineered bacterial clones.

Background
As part of the iGEM project particular enzymes-of-interest have been genetically inserted into the genomes of specific bacterial clones. In the 5 laboratory sessions SSP students learn how to select the recombinant bacteria, identify the engineered genomes and investigate the expression of the engineered enzyme-of-interest in the bacterial clones.

Skills gained
In the process of investigating this project students will carry out most of the fundamental techniques in molecular biology; restriction digestion, agarose gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE, enzyme activity assays, native agarose gel electrophoresis as well as basic microbiology techniques.

Presentation
Students as a group of 4 present their findings as a poster, with an abstract. These abstracts will be collated into “conference” proceedings and the posters are displayed on the electronic noticeboard in the foyer of the Molecular Biosciences building (G08).

BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Semester 2, 2017 onwards)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Professor Pauline Ross Classes: 2x1 hr lectures and 12 x 3 hours of practicals Prerequisites: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Prohibitions: BIOL1907/1997. Assessment: Practical (50%), Summative final exam (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day.

Note: Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.

Textbooks

Please see unit outline on LMS.

BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems – Advanced (Semester 2, 2017 onwards)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Professor Pauline Ross Classes: 2x1 hr lectures and 12 x 3 hours of practicals Prerequisites: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Prohibitions: BIOL1007/1997. Assessment: Summative exam (50%) Practical component which may include independent or group project (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day.

Note: Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.

Textbooks

Please see unit outline on LMS.

BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems – Special Studies (Semester 2, 2017 onwards)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Professor Pauline Ross Classes: 2 lectures per week, on-line material and practical work as advised and required by the project – approximately 30-36 hours of research project in the laboratory or fieldPrerequisites: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Prohibitions: BIOL1007/1907. Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), Project report (50%) which includes written report and presentation Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day.

Note: Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be either a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms or organismal/ecosystems biology. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.

Textbooks

Please see unit outline on LMS.