Undergraduate Senior

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Senior units of study offered by the School of Biological Sciences provide a thorough understanding of many areas of contemporary biology. More specifically, the units of study provide students with opportunities to integrate knowledge gained over the degree program; develop a specialist understanding of an area of biology; carry out small research projects (as appropriate) to continue developing skills required to carry out investigations in biology; and understand the characteristics of scholarship and research. Some senior units of study involve some intensive field or laboratory classes that are taken before the beginning of semester one or two. Students majoring in biology should take at least four of the units of study listed below.

Standard units

Semester 1

BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Neville Firth Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL. Prohibitions: BIOL3918 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

A unit of study with lectures, practicals and tutorials on the application of recombinant DNA technology and the genetic manipulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Lectures cover the applications of molecular genetics in biotechnology and consider the impact and implications of genetic engineering and genomics. Topics include biological sequence data and databases, comparative genomics, the cloning and expression of foreign genes in bacteria, yeast, animal and plant cells, novel human and animal therapeutics and vaccines, new diagnostic techniques for human and veterinary disease, the transformation of animal and plant cells, the genetic engineering of animals and plants, and the environmental release of genetically-modified (transgenic) organisms. Practical work may include nucleic acid isolation and manipulation, gene cloning and PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, immunological detection of proteins, and the genetic transformation and assay of plants.

BIOL3918 Gene Technology and Genomics Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Neville Firth Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL. Prohibitions: BIOL3018 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Qualified students will participate in alternative components of BIOL3018 Gene Technology & Genomics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.

BIOL3044 Evolution and Biodiversity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ben Oldroyd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3944, BIOL3025, BIOL3925, PLNT3003, PLNT3903 Assessment: Practical reports and/or presentations (60%), one 1.5-hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

How did the diversity of life arise? Why are there so many species? Why do animals and plants seem so well designed for their environments? How do we explain patterns of distribution across continents? These are some of the key questions that we will examine in this Unit. The Unit begins with a survey of the history of evolutionary thought, and the so-called 'new synthesis'; the melding of Darwinian evolution, systematics and genetics. The Unit will provide training in the principles, methods, and applications of evolutionary biology including systems of classification, the genetics of speciation and hybrid zones, molecular evolution, reconstruction of phylogenies, population genetics, historical interpretation of geographic distributions, evolution of sex, adaptation, human evolution, and selfish gene theory. Examples from a broad range of organisms and data sources will be used throughout the Unit. This Unit is valuable for students who intend to seek employment in areas such as biodiversity research, bioinformatics, ecology, taxonomy, biological conservation and teaching.

Textbooks

Freeman and Herron (2011) Evolutionary Analysis, Pearson/Prentice Hall

BIOL3944 Evolution and Biodiversity (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Murray Henwood, Prof Ben Oldroyd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3044, BIOL3025, BIOL3925, PLNT3003, PLNT3903 Assessment: Practical reports and/or presentations (60%), one 1.5-hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL3044 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. How did the diversity of life arise? Why are there so many species? Why do animals and plants seem so well designed for their environments? How do we explain patterns of distribution across continents? These are some of the key questions that we will examine in this Unit. The Unit begins with a survey of the history of evolutionary thought, and the so-called 'new synthesis'; the melding of Darwinian evolution, systematics and genetics. The Unit will provide training in the principles, methods, and applications of evolutionary biology including systems of classification, the genetics of speciation and hybrid zones, molecular evolution, reconstruction of phylogenies, population genetics, historical interpretation of geographic distributions, evolution of sex, adaptation, human evolution, and selfish gene theory. Examples from a broad range of organisms and data sources will be used throughout the Unit. This Unit is valuable for students who intend to seek employment in areas such as biodiversity research, bioinformatics, ecology, taxonomy, biological conservation and teaching.

Textbooks

Freeman and Herron (2011) Evolutionary Analysis, Pearson/Prentice Hall

BIOL3045 Animal Ecological Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Seebacher Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and three practicals per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3945, BIOL3011, BIOL3911, BIOL3012, BIOL3912 Assessment: Practical reports / presentations (60%), one 1.5-hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Animal Ecological Physiology is a conceptually based unit of study that covers physiological interactions between organisms and their environments. The unit explores evolutionary processes that allow animals to persist in variable environments. These concepts are essential to understanding biodiversity and ecological function of animal populations, and how these are likely to change under future climate change. The unit will be suitable for those with an interest in zoology, as well as students with a particular interest in ecology and evolution. There is a strong focus on experimental biology and incorporating theory into practical classes, during which students design their own experiments. The unit provides essential skills for conducting and presenting research, and for critical evaluation of published research.

BIOL3945 Animal Ecological Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Seebacher Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and three practicals per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3045, BIOL3011, BIOL3911, BIOL3012, BIOL3912 Assessment: Practical reports / presentations (60%), one 1.5-hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL3045 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. Animal Ecological Physiology is a conceptually based unit of study that covers physiological interactions between organisms and their environments. The unit explores evolutionary processes that allow animals to persist in variable environments. These concepts are essential to understanding biodiversity and ecological function of animal populations, and how these are likely to change under future climate change. The unit will be suitable for those with an interest in zoology, as well as students with a particular interest in ecology and evolution. There is a strong focus on experimental biology and incorporating theory into practical classes, during which students design their own experiments. The unit provides essential skills for conducting and presenting research, and for critical evaluation of published research.

BIOL3046 Animal Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ashley Ward Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3946 Assessment: Practical reports, one 2-hour exam (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

The unit will provide a broad overview of the scientific study of animal behaviour. It will consider mechanistic and functional explanations of animal behaviour across contexts including kin selection and altruism, sociality, foraging, aggression and competition, sexual selection and mate choice, the behaviour of predators and prey, and communication and signalling. The information presented and discussed in this unit will reflect the most up-to-date research in each aspect of the field of animal behaviour. Practical sessions are closely aligned with the lecture material and will foster the development of key skills by providing hands-on experience of experimental design, data collection and analysis.

Textbooks

Davies, Krebs, West: An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology, 4th edition, Wiley-Blackwell

BIOL3946 Animal Behaviour (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ashley Ward Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3046 Assessment: Practical reports, one 2-hour exam (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL3046 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The unit will provide a broad overview of the scientific study of animal behaviour. It will consider mechanistic and functional explanations of animal behaviour across contexts including kin selection and altruism, sociality, foraging, aggression and competition, sexual selection and mate choice, the behaviour of predators and prey, and communication and signalling. The information presented and discussed in this unit will reflect the most up-to-date research in each aspect of the field of animal behaviour. Practical sessions are closely aligned with the lecture material and will foster the development of key skills by providing hands-on experience of experimental design, data collection and analysis.

Textbooks

Davies, Krebs, West: An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology, 4th edition, Wiley-Blackwell.

Semester 2

BIOL3007 Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3907 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, group presentations, one essay, one project report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit explores the dynamics of ecological systems, and considers the interactions between individual organisms and populations, organisms and the environment, and ecological processes. Lectures are grouped around four dominant themes: Interactions, Evolutionary Ecology, The Nature of Communities, and Conservation and Management. Emphasis is placed throughout on the importance of quantitative methods in ecology, including sound planning and experimental designs, and on the role of ecological science in the conservation, management, exploitation and control of populations. Relevant case studies and examples of ecological processes are drawn from marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems, with plants, animals, fungi and other life forms considered as required. Students will have some opportunity to undertake short term ecological projects, and to take part in discussions of important and emerging ideas in the ecological literature.

Textbooks

Begon M, Townsend CR, Harper JL (2005) Ecology, From individuals to ecosystems. Wiley-Blackwell.

BIOL3907 Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: See BIOL3007 Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3007 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, presentations, one essay, one project report (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3007 Ecology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study participate in alternatives to some elements of the standard course and will be encouraged to pursue the objectives by more independent means in a series of research tutorials. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester 2. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.

Textbooks

As for BIOL3007 may vary from year to year. Some assessment will be in an alternative format to components of BIOL3026.

BIOL3013 Marine Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr William Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972); or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (GEOS2115 or GEOS2915). Prohibitions: BIOL3913 Assessment: Practical reports, data exercises and exams (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

We will examine in detail processes that are important for the establishment and maintenance of marine communities. Lectures will expose students to the key ideas, researchers and methodologies within selected fields of marine biology. Laboratory sessions and field excursions will complement the lectures by providing students with hands-on experience with the organisms and the processes that affect them. Students will develop critical analysis and scientific writing skills while examining the current literature.

BIOL3913 Marine Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr William Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: See BIOL3013. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972); or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (GEOS2115 or GEOS2915). Prohibitions: BIOL3013 Assessment: Practical reports, data exerices and exams (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Qualified students will participate in alternative components of the BIOL3013 Marine Biology unit. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.

BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mary Byrne, Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 2 Classes: Twenty-four 1 hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL. Prohibitions: BIOL3926 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit discusses major concepts and current understanding of developmental biology with an emphasis on molecular genetics. The developmental genetics of model plant and animal systems, and approaches used to determine how a complex multicellular organism is established from a single cell, will be investigated. Topics to be discussed will cover a broad range of developmental genetics in animal species, using examples from the model species Drosophila, C. elegans, and mouse. Plant specific processes such as leaf, root and flower development will also be covered. using examples from the model species Arabidopsis. The study of mutants in development will be used to highlight pattern formation, gene interactions and the importance of regulated gene expression in development. Reference will be made to the use of modern techniques in developmental biology such as transgenics, recombinant DNA technology, and tissue-specific expression analysis. Various methods of genetic mapping will be covered. Practical work complements the theoretical aspects of the course and develops important skills in genetics.

BIOL3926 Developmental Genetics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mary Byrne Session: Semester 2 Classes: Twenty-four 1 hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL. Prohibitions: BIOL3026 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

Qualified students will participate in alternative components to BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics. The content and nature of these components

BIOL3043 Plant Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Warren Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3943, PLNT3001, PLNT3002, PLNT3901, PLNT3902 Assessment: Practical report / lab notebook / group presentation (45%), class discussions (15%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit explores major concepts, discoveries and controversies in the plant sciences. Lectures will examine the mechanisms plants employ to adapt and acclimate to the environment. Major topics include growth and development, acquisition of resources such as light and nutrients, perception and response to signals, and interactions of plants with other organisms. Emphasis will be placed on integration of plant responses from molecular through to whole plant scales. There is a focus on recent research that has been critical in enhancing our current understanding of plant biology. Lectures are augmented by experimental work. This unit of study complements other Senior units of study in the Plant Science Major and is essential for those seeking a career in plant biology.

BIOL3943 Plant Science (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Warren Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3043, PLNT3001, PLNT3002, PLNT3901, PLNT3902 Assessment: Practical report / lab notebook / group presentation (45%), class discussions (15%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL3043 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. This unit explores major concepts, discoveries and controversies in the plant sciences. Lectures will examine the mechanisms plants employ to adapt and acclimate to the environment. Major topics include growth and development, acquisition of resources such as light and nutrients, perception and response to signals, and interactions of plants with other organisms. Emphasis will be placed on integration of plant responses from molecular through to whole plant scales. There is a focus on recent research that has been critical in enhancing our current understanding of plant biology. Lectures are augmented by experimental work. This unit of study complements other Senior units of study in the Plant Science Major and is essential for those seeking a career in plant biology.

Fieldwork units

Even years (2014, 2016…)

BIOL3016 Coral Reef Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Maria Byrne Prerequisite: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibition: BIOL3916, BIOL2020, BIOL2920, NTMP3001 Offered: Interval July Classes: Fieldwork 80 hours block mode (21-27 July inclusive). Assessment: Participation in field work, essay, project report and an exam (100%).

Coral Reef Biology is an intensive unit held at a research station on the Great Barrier Reef. The unit focuses on the dominant taxa in coral reef environments and the linkages between them. Emphasis is placed on the biological adaptations for life in tropical waters and the ecological, oceanographic and physiological processes involved. Aspects covered include: processes influencing the distribution of coral reefs, symbiosis, reef connectivity, lagoon systems, nutrient cycling and the impacts of climate change and other anthropogenic pressures on the world's corals reefs.

NB: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. This unit of study is only available in EVEN numbered years only (e.g. 2014, 2016...), but students are offered alternative Senior field units in ODD numbered years.

BIOL3916 Coral Reef Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Maria Byrne Prerequisite: Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibition: BIOL3016, BIOL2020, BIOL2920, NTMP3001 Offered: Interval July Classes: Fieldwork 80 hours block mode (21-27 July inclusive). Assessment: Participation in field work, essay, project report and exam (100%).

This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3016, Coral Reef Biology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects of tropical marine biology in greater depth, with a focus on the GBR. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study will pursue individual projects in consultation with, and under the guidance of, the course coordinator. The aim is to design a project relating to the particular interests of the student. The nature of these projects will vary from year to year. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.

NB: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. This unit of study is only available in EVEN numbered years only (e.g. 2014, 2016...), but students are offered alternative Senior field units in ODD numbered years.

BIOL3009 Terrestrial Field Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Glenda Wardle Prerequisite: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibition: BIOL3909. BIOL2009, BIOL2909. Offered: Interval August Classes: Note: One 6-day field trip held in the pre-semester break (July 20 - July 25 inclusive) and four 4-hour practical classes during weeks 1-4 of semester 2. Assessment: Discussions and quiz (10%), research project proposal and brief presentation (10%), sampling project report (20%), specimen collection (10%), research project report (50%).

This field course provides practical experience in terrestrial ecology suited to a broad range of careers in ecology, environmental consulting and wildlife management. Students learn a broad range of ecological sampling techniques and develop a detailed understanding of the logical requirements necessary for manipulative ecological field experiments. The field work incorporates survey techniques for plants, small mammals and invertebrates and thus provides a good background for ecological consulting work. Students attend a week-long field course and participate in a large-scale research project as well as conducting their own research project. Invited experts contribute to the lectures and discussions on issues relating to the ecology, conservation and management of Australia's terrestrial flora and fauna.

NB: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. This unit is only available in EVEN numbered years (e.g. 2014, 2016...), but students are offered alternative Senior field units in ODD numbered years.

BIOL3909 Terrestrial Field Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Glenda Wardle Prerequisite: Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or 6 credit points Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibition: BIOL3009, BIOL2009, BIOL2909. Offered: Int August Classes: See BIOL3009. Assessment: Discussions and quiz (10%), research project proposal and brief presentation (10%), sampling project report (20%), sample and data processing (10%), research project report (50%).

This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3009 Terrestrial Field Ecology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from applicants on the basis of previous performance. Students taking this unit of study will complete an individual research project on a topic negotiated with a member of staff. It is expected that much of the data collection will be completed during the field trip but some extra time may be needed during semester 2. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students at the beginning of the unit. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.

NB: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. This unit is only available in EVEN numbered years (e.g. 2014, 2016...), but students are offered alternative Senior field units in ODD numbered years.

Odd years (2015, 2017...)

BIOL3008 Marine Field Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman Sessions: Intensive July Classes: Intensive 8-day field course held in the pre-semester break. Prerequisites: 12cp Intermediate BIOL; or 6cp Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3908, BIOL2028, BIOL2928 Assumed knowledge: BIOL2018 or GEOS2115. Prior completion of BIOL3006 or BIOL3906 is very strongly recommended. Assessment: Discussion groups, research project proposal, biodiversity survey report, data analysis and checking, research project report (100%).

Note: Department permission required for enrolment.

Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. This unit is only available in ODD numbered years (e.g. 2013, 2015, etc). Students are offered alternative senior field units in EVEN numbered years. Dates:14th July - 21st July 2013.

This field course provides a practical introduction to the experimental analysis of marine populations and assemblages. Students gain experience using a range of intertidal sampling techniques and develop a detailed understanding of the logical requirements necessary for manipulative ecological field experiments. No particular mathematical or statistical skills are required for this subject. Group experimental research projects in the field are the focus of the unit during the day, with lectures and discussion groups about the analysis of experimental data and current issues in experimental marine ecology occurring in the evening.

Textbooks

No textbook is prescribed but Coastal Marine Ecology of Temperate Australia. Eds. Underwood, A.J. & Chapman, M.G. 1995. University of New South Wales Press, provides useful background reading.

BIOL3908 Marine Field Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman. Sessions: Intensive July Classes: One 8-day field course held in the pre-semester break, plus four 1-hour tutorials during semester 2. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12cp Intermediate BIOL; or 6cp Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3008, BIOL2028, BIOL2928 Assessment: Discussion groups, research project proposal, biodiversity report, data analysis and checking, research project report (100%).

Note: Department permission required for enrolment.

Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. This unit is only available in ODD numbered years (e.g. 2013, 2015, etc). Students are offered alternative Senior field units in EVEN numbered years. Dates: 14th July - 21st July 2013.

This unit has the same objectives as Marine Field Ecology BIOL3008, and is suitable for students wishing to pursue certain aspects of marine field ecology in a greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from applicants on the basis of past performance. Students taking this unit of study will be expected to take part in a number of additional tutorials after the field course on advanced aspects of experimental design and analysis and will be expected to incorporate these advanced skills into their analyses and project reports. This unit may be taken as part of the BSc(Advanced).

Textbooks

As for BIOL 3008.

BIOL3010 Tropical Wildlife Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Greenless Sessions: Intensive February Classes: 5-day Field School, followed by 5 days of classes at Sydney University. Prerequisites: 12cp Intermediate BIOL; or 6cp Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL2010, BIOL2910, BIOL3910 Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam, one 1-hour practical exam, one 2000-word report, one 3000-word paper, one 15-minute oral presentation (100%).

Note: Department permission required for enrolment.

Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. This unit only available in ODD numbered years (e.g. 2013, 2015, etc). Students are offered alternative Senior field units in EVEN numbered years.

Australia has a unique terrestrial vertebrate fauna, but also has the worst record of recent mammalian extinctions. Because of Australia's unusual climate, landforms, and the rarity of many species, the management of our native wildlife presents special challenges for biologists, conservationists and land managers. This unit of study addresses the biogeography, ecology and management of Australia's terrestrial fauna. The subject comprises of a five-day field course at Mary River Park in the Northern Territory. During the course, students will learn how to carry out wildlife surveys, how to identify animals, how to track wildlife, and how to design and complete a field experiment. The field trip will be complemented by guest lectures from experts in the fields of evolution, ecology and wildlife management. A one day field trip to Litchfield National Park will be held on the last day of the field course.

BIOL3910 Tropical Wildlife Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Greenless Sessions: Intensive February Classes: See BIOL3010. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12cp Intermediate BIOL; or 6cp Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL2010, BIOL2910, BIOL3010 Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam, one 1-hour practical exam, one 2000-word report, one 3000-word paper, one 15-minute oral presentation (100%).

Note: Department permission required for enrolment.

Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. This unit is only available in ODD numbered years (e.g. 2013, 2015, etc). Students are offered alternative Senior field units in EVEN numbered years.

This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3010 Tropical Wildlife Biology and Management, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study will participate in alternatives to some elements of the standard course and will be required to pursue the objectives by more independent means. For example, student willl be able to design and carry out their own field or laboratory experiment, and complete it during the five day firled trip. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students at the beginning of the unit. Advanced students should contact Dr Jonathan Webb via email to discuss potential projects. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc(Advanced) program.