LINKAGE GRANTS FOSTER NEW INDUSTRY COLLABORATIONS

9 February 2018





$1.7 million in funding for new projects linking researchers with global pharma, mining and defence companies.

Sydney researchers will join forces with high profile industry partners on projects to strengthen defence, improve drug delivery and develop safer and more efficient mining technologies.

More than $1.7 million was today awarded to Sydney projects in the first Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Project outcomes for 2018. Linkage Projects support academics to work with government and industry partners to tackle complex problems and fast-track solutions to benefit end users.

We congratulate the following staff of the School of Chemistry who received Linkage grants this year which involve first class researchers working with world-class partners on projects that have the potential to deliver important outcomes not only for our partners and our researchers, but for society more generally.

James Beattie

James Beattie

Greg Warr

Greg Warr

Brian Hawkett

Brian Hawkett

Associate Professor Brian Hawkett, Professor Greg Warr and Associate Professor James Beattie et al were awarded $636,000 to work with Australian mining explosives company Dyno Nobel. This project aims to understand the underlying mechanisms behind the physical and chemical breakdown of ammonium nitrate based emulsion explosives used for mining in geothermally active regions. It will apply this knowledge to develop a new class of high temperature- and pressure- resistant emulsion explosives. The resulting technology will be used in the safe and efficient mining of precious mineral deposits, such as gold, in geothermally active regions worldwide. The project will benefit the Australian mining industry by allowing mining of resources at deep levels, creating more jobs and increasing Australia's export earnings.


Chiara Neto

Chiara Neto

Brian Hawkett

Brian Hawkett

Associate Professors Brian Hawkett and Chiara Neto et al were awarded $660,683 to work with DuluxGroup (Australia) Pty Ltd. This project aims to create an advanced micro-capsule system to be used in the manufacturing of high-performance waterborne paints on a large scale. Surface coatings seal, strengthen, and decorate the majority of surfaces in the building industry. Despite their importance, advances in paint science have only been incremental and a truly stain-resistant, robust and environmentally friendly coating has yet to be developed. This project will use polymer Janus nanoparticles to radically redesign architectural coatings, with the goal to reduce the use of non-renewable components, and increase stain-resistance and durability. This new technology will lead to less disruption for the environment, and important economic and technological benefits for Australia.


Liz Carter

Liz Carter

Peter Lay

Peter Lay

Professor Peter Lay and Dr Liz Carter et al were awarded $786,000 linkage grant shared with The University of New South Wales. This project aims to provide scientifically verified methods to avoid, intercept and redesign products that cause the most abundant type of marine plastic pollution – clothing fibres - which has increased by over 450% in 60 years. It will determine how natural and plastic fibres, clothing brands and washing machine filters, alter fibre emissions and ecological impacts. This will enable protocols to improve products and the environment, and reduce health risks that will benefit the public, government regulation and companies in designing "eco-friendly" products.