SCIENCE STUDENT MENTORS

Thank you for your interest in becoming a mentor.

The Faculty of Science runs the Science Transition Program in order to support commencing science students during their first year at university. One of the best ways to do this is to introduce first year students to people in the know – senior students such as yourself!

If you have had a positive experience during your undergraduate studies and would like to help others do likewise, you can volunteer to become a student mentor. As a mentor you will be instrumental in assisting first year students to build academic and social networks so that they settle more quickly into life as a student and get the most from their time here on campus.


Online applications for 2012 have now closed.
Please contact the directly to register your interest. (All mentors must be available for Mentor Training, which will be held in mid-February 2012.)

Mentoring students banner

Benefits for mentors:

  • Receive free training and develop desirable professional skills
  • Receive recognition from the Faculty of Science
  • Gain experience in team leadership
  • Widen your networks within the Faculty of Science
  • Help other students (and have fun!)

FAQ

Mentor frequently asked questions
What does being a mentor involve?
How do I know when the training session is?  How long will it go for?
What if I can't make it to the training session?
How long does the program run for?
How are first year students matched with their mentors?
Do I get paid?
When will the social events take place?
Can mentors organise our own additional events?
Is there support if I need it?
What is a mentor?
Mentoring students walking backpacks banner

What does being a mentor involve?

The Mentoring Program has two parts:

All mentors must attend the Training session, which is held in mid-February.

How do I know when the training session is? How long will it go for?

Mentor training usually takes place a fortnight before the commencement of Semester One. This training session runs for approximately 3 hours (returning mentors are required to attend this training session). The Mentoring Program Coordinators will communicate details of the training sessions, social events and other meetings to you via email. Therefore, it is VERY important that you check your University email account regularly.

What if I can't make it to the training session?

For those who can not make it to the training session, the Mentoring Program Coordinators may organise one 'catch up' training session (depending on numbers). If you are unable to attend either training session, your position as a mentor may be resigned depending on your individual circumstances and your current knowledge of mentoring. This decision will rest entirely with the Mentoring Program Coordinators.

How long does the program run for?

The Science Student Transition Workshop is a one-day welcome day for commencing science undergraduates and is usually held on the Saturday or Sunday before O-week. Mentors will then arrange to meet-up with their first year students again during O-week.

SLAM (Science Link-up And Mentoring) lunches consist of three 1 hour lunchtime meetings (2 in Semester One and 1 on Semester Two). Mentors are also expected to correspond on a regular basis with their first year students to help them settle into university.

Additional roles in the capacity of a Transition Support Committee may be assigned to outstanding mentors in order to assist with the promotion and organisation of the Science Student Transition Workshop and SLAM lunches for the full duration of these programs.

Social events: a small number of social events may be held early in semester and at the completion of the program. It is anticipated that mentors will attend these events (timetable permitting).

How are first year students matched with their mentors?

When first year students register for the The Science Student Transition Workshop and SLAM lunches, they elect a discipline group. These groups are based on mentors' areas of interest and might include:

  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Geosciences
  • History and Philosophy of Science (HPS)
  • Liberal Arts and Sciences (BLAS)
  • Medical Sciences
  • Molecular Biosciences
  • Nutrition
  • Physics
  • Psychology
  • Science (general / interdisciplinary)

Mentors elect their preferred discipline group prior to the training session.

Do I get paid?

Mentoring is a voluntary role designed to assist commencing students settle in to university. Although mentors do not receive payment, some of the many benefits you will gain are; mentoring and coaching skills, enhanced social and interpersonal skills, certificates, free food, social events and, in some cases, prizes such as movie and Co-Op vouchers.

When will the social events take place?

Social event dates and times will vary from ear to year. Please check your University email regularly for the dates and times of social events.

Can mentors organise our own additional events?

Absolutely - we encourage you to organise additional outings and/or meetings with your first year students. You might even like to get together with other mentors and do something with a larger group.

Is there support if I need it?

Of course! Mentoring is not just for first year students. Experienced mentors, tutors, demonstrators and academics are all available to assist you during the program. These peers and advisers will be happy to support you and offer advice if and when you need it. You can also with any questions you may have.

A Mentor:

Mentors with map
  • is a senior student
  • is a volunteer
  • helps a small group of new students to settle in
  • maintains this support for the duration of the program
  • directs students to various support services available on campus
  • is enthusiastic about peer mentoring
  • does not need to be an expert
  • does not need to act as a tutor for students in the group.