Degree Requirements for the Combined Degrees – An Explanation

Ie. Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Commerce or Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Law

Introduction

Most people who do one of the degrees listed above take five years to complete it, full-time.

In the first three years of candidature, you study both Science components and components from the second part of your degree and, in this way, meet the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree. This leaves you the final two years to complete the remaining components if you still wish to, and to graduate with a Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of “x” degree.

Please note that the requirements given below refer in detail only to Years 1, 2 and 3 of the degree program. You can consult the Faculty Handbook that applies to the second half of your combined degree, in print or online, to find out more about the requirements for Years 4 and 5.

For this example we will look at the combined Science/Arts degree – this is not an exhaustive list of all the requirements, just a summary of the main things you need to consider. You will need to look at the degree requirements for your particular combined degree.

Requirements for Years 1 -3

There's considerable freedom of choice in what to study in the first three years of a Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degree, but there are a few requirements that you will have to follow. These requirements are listed here and explained in detail below.

To qualify for the award of the pass degrees in the BA/BSc course a student should complete:

Degree Requirements for Combined Degrees

To qualify for the award of the pass degrees in the BSc/BA course a student would normally satisfy the requirements for the BSc in the first six semesters of enrolment. So you will also need to look at the requirements for the BSc earlier in the Handbook and also the enrolment guide to majors, which is directly after this.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What are Credit Points?
  2. How do I get 240 Credit Points?
  3. How do these 96 Credit Points fit into the requirements for 240 Credit Points?
  4. What are Junior Credit Points?
  5. How many Junior Credit Points should I do in my First Year?
  6. How would I get at least 24 Junior Credit Points of Science from two Science subject areas not including Mathematics?
  7. How would I get at least 12 Credit Points from the Science subject areas of Mathematics and Statistics?
  8. If 36 Junior Science Credit Points including Mathematics is the Minimum Required for my Degree why should I do any more?
  9. Why can I do no more than 96 Junior Credit Points?
  10. I've chosen my Junior Units of Study – What Next?
  11. What is a 'major' in the Faculty Of Science?
  12. Can I do more than one Major from Science?
  13. What's the maximum number of Credit Points I can take per Semester?
  14. At least 72 Credit Points of Senior Units of Study in Arts subject areas, including a Major from Part A of the Table Of Undergraduate Units Of Study In The Faculty Of Arts.
  15. Why do you recommend we complete the 240 Credit Points in this way – what if I want to do it differently?

1. What are credit points?

Students doing a Science/Arts degree are able to choose to study in a wide range of subject areas from Science and Arts. A semester-length component in a particular subject area is called a 'unit of study'.

Most units of study are worth 6 credit points each.

2. How do I get 240 credit points?

Most people studying full time take three years to complete the Bachelor of Science component of the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degree.

Full-time students usually earn the first 144 credit points (the requirement to complete a BSc) by taking units of study worth a total of at least 48 credit points per year (about 24 credit points per semester) over these three years of their degree, that is:

48 credit points x 3 years = 144 credit points i.e. your BSc degree


Then you go on to complete the final two years, which is the Arts component

48 credit points x 5 years = 240 credit points i.e. your combined degree

3. How do these 96 credit points fit into the requirements for 240 credit points?

The 96 credit points you earn from the Science table of units of study will go together with 48 credit points from Arts units of study (see Requirement 6 below for details), to make the total of 144 credit points in the first three years of your degree program

96 credit points from Science + 48 credit points from Arts = 144 credit points in total (the requirements for your BSc)



then you will study 96 credit points from Arts in your final two years


144 credit points in first three years + 96 in last two = 240 credit points, the Combined Degree

4. What are junior credit points?

You start your degree by taking 'junior' units of study. They form a foundation for more advanced intermediate and senior units. Junior units of study are worth 6 junior credit points each.

Junior units are sometimes called 1000 level units because their unit of study codes all have the form 1XXX, e.g. BIOL 1001

5. How many junior credit points should I do in my first year?

Most full-time students take units of study worth a total of 48 junior credit points in their first year (generally a total of 24 credit points in each semester

To make up 48 credit points in your first year, most students take four 6 credit point junior units in each semester. You will need to make sure to include:

Any junior prerequisites you may need for your Science senior requirements (look at the enrolment guides to majors for more information).

Check the Faculty of Science Handbook, the online Table of Units of Study or the Unit of Study Database to find out if there are any prerequisites for senior units in the subjects you plan to study.

N.B some combined degrees like Science/Law will have CORE junior Law units of study so be sure to look at the Sample table of study and degree requirements to check you are enrolling in these if need be.

The sample Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts table shows an example of how you might put together 48 junior credit points in your first year, if you're studying full time:

You may not necessarily choose the combinations given in the example. Just remember, if you're aiming to complete the Bachelor of Science part of your degree in three years, to make sure your units add up to 48 credit points over the first year.

6. How would I get at least 24 junior credit points of Science from two science subject areas not including Mathematics?

Most full-time students take units of study worth 48 junior credit points in their first year (generally 24 credit points in each semester).

To make up your 48 credit points in your first year, most students take four 6 credit point junior units in each semester.

The science units that you choose to do in must total at least 24 credit points and come from two different science subject areas (units of study in the same science subject areas begin with the same four letters e.g. BIOL for Biology, so this requirement means you can't take units of study totalling 24 credit points which all begin with the same four letters).

The degree table example allows for up to 12 junior credit points from some Arts in your first year – this will help you lay the foundation for the senior Arts units of study that you will want to study later. If you're aiming to complete your degree over five years, just remember to make sure that you earn 48 credit points over your first year.

7. How would I get at least 12 credit points from the Science subject areas of Mathematics and Statistics?

Most students will choose to do their minimum 12 credit points of Mathematics at Junior level which, with the “at least 24 junior credit points not including Maths and Statistics” requirement above makes a total of 36 credit points of Junior study which has to be completed.

8. If 36 junior science credit points including Mathematics is the minimum required for my degree why should I do any more?

You can do less than 48 credit points in your junior year but it's not a good idea for the following reasons….

Junior units form a foundation for further study. In some cases, this is a necessary foundation for more advanced study in a particular subject area. In all cases, junior units provide an opportunity to work at developing the skills and ways of thinking that you will need for more advanced learning at the tertiary level.

Junior units of study offer you the chance to sample a range of subject areas and gain a variety of learning experiences, even in subjects that you may not go on to specialise in.

You will therefore need to take the Junior Arts units of study scheduled in the Sample BSc/BA in order to be on track to complete the Arts component of your degree later on.

REMEMBER that total of 240 credit points? – this is easier to achieve if you complete the full complement of 48 junior units (24 per semester) in your first year of enrolment.

9. Why can I do no more than 96 junior credit points?

While junior units give you an excellent introduction to the subject, and function as a foundation for further study, they aren't, in themselves, sufficient to provide you with substantial expertise in a subject area. Junior units of study are necessary, but not sufficient, for a Bachelor's degree!

10. I've chosen my junior units of study – what next?

Intermediate and senior units of study build on the foundation of learning established by junior units. These will be worth 6 senior credit points each. When choosing these you need to think about the major(s) that you are planning to take.

11. What is a 'major' in the Faculty of Science?

To earn a major in a subject area in the Faculty of Science, students will normally complete 24 senior credit points in THAT subject area. (Excepting the major in Psychology which requires that you complete 48 credit points across Intermediate and Senior Psychology).

Of course, you may need to have appropriate junior (1XXX) and intermediate (2XXX) prerequisites in place before you can do these senior units of study.

You can't start taking senior units of study to complete your major until you have the appropriate foundation of intermediate and junior units in place. In many (but not all) cases this means that you have to take junior then intermediate units in the same subject area, as prerequisites for your senior units. You'll need to check the Faculty of Science Handbook in print or online.

LOOK UP "The Enrolment Guide by Major" and then
"The Unit of Study Tables" – especially for prerequisites

 
Once you've chosen your Units of Study then take a look at the….

"Sample bachelor of science table" do your choices look like they are following this plan?

And the degree requirements – will you be satisfying these with the choices you have made?

You will probably want to study, 48 intermediate credit points in Year 2 and a further 48 senior credit points in Year 3 and this will add up to 96 senior credit points.

When you sum the credit points earned in Years 1, 2, and 3, you can see they add up to 144 credit points......i.e. your Bachelor of Science degree, you can then go on to complete the Arts component.

12. Can I do more than one major from Science?

Unfortunately, you can't fit in two majors from Science in your Bachelor of Science / Arts degree. However, note that you do not have to decide on the subject area of your major in first year; you can make that decision in second year, after you've tried out a range of different subject areas in Science.

13. What's the maximum number of credit points I can take per semester?

You might want to take more than the usual number of credit points in one semester - perhaps to make up for a unit of study that you have failed or to try to get through your degree more quickly.

You are permitted to do up to (but no more than) 32 credit points per semester in your second and third years. However, be aware that 32 credit points in a single semester is a very heavy load. It's unlikely that you'll be able to do your best in each unit you take and very unlikely that you'll have time for many extra curricular activities.

14. At least 72 credit points of senior units of study in Arts subject areas, including a major from Part A of the table of undergraduate units of study in the Faculty of Arts.

By the time you get to Years 4 and 5 of your degree you will have completed the Bachelor of Science component, and will focus only on the remaining Arts components of your degree. You'll take Arts units of study worth 48 credit points per year. Refer to the Faculty of Arts handbook and website for information on a Major in the Faculty of Arts.

15. Why do your recommend we complete the 240 credit points in this way – what if I want to do it differently?

A lot can change in 3 years and even more in 5. Some students enrolled in combined degrees may receive job offers or their interests and priorities may change causing them to want to graduate after 3 years. Others may decide they want to go on to do Honours in a Science area that interests them rather than completing the second half of the combined degree. If you have not completed the requirements for the BSc as listed in the handbook you will not be allowed to graduate no matter how many credit points you have gained overall. By planning your study like this you give yourself more options should this occur.