student profile: Miss Curie Jane Suk


Map

Thesis work

Thesis title: The effects of immediate recall on eyewitness memory and the misinformation effect

Supervisors: Helen PATERSON , Pauline HOWIE

Thesis abstract:

Typically, eyewitness interviews take place after some delay since the occurrence of an incident. Given that declarative memory decays over time and can be influenced by post-event misinformation from various sources, the utilisation of an immediate recall tool during the initial stages of an investigation has been suggested to minimise the issues associated with such delays. However, research has produced inconsistent findings regarding the effectiveness of immediate recall and such discrepancies have been attributable to methodological factors. The aim of this project is to examine the effect that immediate recall would have on eyewitness memory and witnesses’ susceptibility to misinformation. In particular, the research applies psychological theory to investigate the optimal immediate recall conditions for eyewitnesses to preserve the integrity of their memories for an original event, enabling them to provide more accurate and complete statements.

Selected publications

Download citations: PDF RTF Endnote

Conferences

  • Suk, C., Paterson, H. (2017). Optimal immediate recall conditions for enhanced memory: Do test format and response modality matter? Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition (SARMAC XII), Sydney: Unpublished.

2017

  • Suk, C., Paterson, H. (2017). Optimal immediate recall conditions for enhanced memory: Do test format and response modality matter? Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition (SARMAC XII), Sydney: Unpublished.

Note: This profile is for a student at the University of Sydney. Views presented here are not necessarily those of the University.