Associate Professor Dieter Hochuli

A08 - Heydon-Laurence Building
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9351 3992
Fax +61 2 9351 4119

Website Rm 401 Heydon-Laurence Bldg
Hochuli Lab on Facebook
Follow me on Twitter

Biographical details

I run the Integrative Ecology group at The University of Sydney. We use multiscale approaches to examine the mechanisms driving the ecology of a range of species, especially in novel ecosystems. I've been at the University since 1995, shortly after completing my PhD. In addition to my research I also coordinate the School of Biological Sciences’ honours and talented student programs for high achieving students. I have been a member of the steering committee for the University’s Women in Science Project since its inception in 2007.

The real bio

Despite an inordinate fondness for whales and pandas in my formative years I only became aware that it might actually be worth pursuing a career in biology on a second year field trip to Heron Island in the mid-1980s. I attended Monash University as an undergraduate with the sole intention of becoming a psychologist, despite an academic history suggesting some aptitude for English literature and a not a great deal for most of the sciences. Needing another major to complete my psychology degree, zoology loomed as the most harmless. Subsequent exposure to the challenges and joys of biology were enough to convince me that even if the job prospects and future earnings appeared bleak it was worth persisting with.

My short attention span and gullible nature left me with true and undying loyalties for most of the planet’s fauna at various times during my degree, depending on time of day and to whom I was talking. I initially flirted with an honours project looking at the nutritional ecology of birds until it became apparent that I would have to kill a bunch of them after raising them from chicks. I had no qualms about doing the same with herbivorous insects, specifically plague locusts, that formed the basis of my first research. Having regarded bugs as an interesting novelty throughout much of my undergraduate training it came as somewhat of a surprise to realise that these animals were the missing piece in my career puzzle. Not only were they greatly understudied, but after several minutes in the field it was obvious that they were also key elements of virtually every terrestrial system. Perhaps even more importantly, I realised that I really liked them too.

The simple logic underpinning my study of insect-plant interactions, that the world is green despite being populated by millions of ravenous insect species trying to find better ways of consuming plants, has always maintained its appeal. After honours I moved to La Trobe University, switched from locusts to caterpillars and completed my PhD in December 1994. I applied for a level A lectureship at Sydney the week I submitted and I’ve been here since April 1995.

The opportunity to indulge in worthwhile projects in collaboration with dedicated and motivated colleagues, particularly postgraduate students, is one of the great privileges of academic life and anyone interested in honours or postgraduate work in my lab should contact me directly.

I still don’t know why insects don’t eat all plants.

Research interests

My work focuses on the ecology of terrestrial arthropods and their interactions with their environments, especially with respect to the plants with which they interact. We work at scales from landscapes down to individuals. I'm currently working on a diverse range of research questions that integrate my interests in community ecology and landscape ecology.

Insect-plant interactions

The simple facts are that the world is dominated by plants that seem to spend their life interacting in all manner of ways with the most speciose group of animals on the planet, insects.

We use multi-species multi-scale approaches to give us a leaf to landscape understanding of insect-plant interactions. We’re currently examining herbivory, pollination and seed dispersal by insects in a number of contexts, looking at everything from the mechanistic underpinnings of the relationships to how landscape disturbances change the integrity of these interactions. This work also targets potential top-down regulation of insect herbivores through predation and parasitism. At coarser scales, I’m interested in the roles of habitat characteristics in regulating assemblages and how organisms make decisions about how they use the habitats around them.

I’m also looking at big picture insect-plant interactions in collaborations with several systematists to identify how co-evolutionary relationships contribute to host specificity among herbivorous insects and ultimately, radiations of insects on different host plants. This is part of a larger project looking at coextinction risks for insects on threatened plants. We’re developing spatially explicitly models for estimating coextinction risk with a view to identifying the extent to which hidden losses of undescribed and unknown herbivores contribute to the extinction crisis.

Areas of Interest
Urban ecology and habitat restoration

My work on insect-plant interactions also has an applied perspective, giving insights into the effects of habitat fragmentation and benefits of ecological restoration. Given that over half the world’s population now live in urban areas and about 80% will by 2050, understanding how urban ecosystems work is vital to our sustainability. Sydney’s remnant vegetation is an ideal model system to work in allowing us to examine the impacts of urbanization and how we can manage what we still have as well as restore degraded systems.

Our work has shown that the declines in many of these urban systems are due to disruptions to ecological interactions. Interestingly, while further declines in functionally important components of diversity are likely to create some degree of ecological mayhem through the breakdown of ecological interactions, our work also points to how these novel urban ecosystems can be surprisingly resilient.

The beauty of trying to understand ecology at landscape scales is that we’re obliged to consider the systems in all their complexity - our work has had to integrate classical experimental approaches in ecology looking at competition, predation and environmental drivers with an understanding of how they interact with invasion, fragmentation and restoration. Our current work is investigating bottom-up and top-down drivers of ecology in urban systems as well as how structural attributes of remnant vegetation contribute to their integrity.

If you’re interested in working on these sorts of questions with me please have a look at our lab web site and get in touch.

Urban ecology and habitat restoration

Awards and honours

2010 Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Research Higher Degree Supervision

2011 The University Co-op Bookshop Excellence in Teaching Award

In the media

Why we can't survive without insects
Interview with James O'Loghlin, 702 ABC in 2012

What would the world be like if there were no ants, bees, cockroaches, mosquitoes or dragonflies? Professor Dieter Hochuli is with the school of biological sciences at the University of Sydney and explains that while insects can live without us, we can't live without them.

Survival in The City

The lab's work features extensively in this piece in the Sydney Morning Herald

> Survival in The City

Research Bites - Associate Professor Dieter Hochuli - The nature of cities: urban ecology in a changing world

Indulgences

Rare books exhibition at Fisher Library in 2009

In addition to my scientific research I have also curated a rare books exhibition examining how early observers predicted current environmental issues in Australia, judged environmental film festivals and performed standup comedy at the Sydney Festival's Bright Club. The rare books exhibition at Fisher Library in 2009 gave me the chance to indulge my interests in art and history. Browsing through the treasures buried deep in the basement of the library’s rare books collection was sobering – it seems that folk looking at Australian systems in the 1850s knew that things like extinction and irreversible environmental degradation were inevitable unless we started to look after a our environment. Needless to say they were right.

Rare books exhibition at Fisher Library in 2009
Rare books exhibition at Fisher Library in 2009

Dieter Hochuli at Bright Club at Sydney Festival 2012

And if you have 10minutes spare, here's the most terrifying presentation I ever gave...
all in the name of comedy.

Selected grants

2011

  • Benchmarks for ecological function in urban ecosystems; Hochuli D; Environmental Trust/Environmental Research Program - Major Grants.

2010

  • A new tool for assessing ecological integrity in urban landscapes; Hochuli D; Environmental Trust/Environmental Research Program - Seed Grants.

2009

  • Leaf traits of angophora costata in isolated urban remnants; Hochuli D; DVC Research/Bridging Support Grant.

2004

  • Does Ecological Restoration Work? Invertebrate Diversity And Fundamental Ecological Processes In Restored Remnants Of Agricultural Landscapes; Hochuli D, Keith D; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Linkage Projects (LP).
  • Do fire history, vegetation and biotic disturbance affect the diversity and abundance of fauna on rock outcrops?; Hochuli D; DVC Research/Research and Development Scheme: Research and Development (R&D).

2002

  • Study project: do invasive native species structure ant communities?; Hochuli D; Australian Geographic Society/Research Grant.

2001

  • Linkage 2002 - Does Ecological Restoration Work? Invertebrate Diversity and Fundamental Ecological; Hochuli D, Lomov B; NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service/Project Support.

2000

  • Feeding behaviour, functional morphology and the nutritional ecology of insect herbivores.; Hochuli D; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Small Grants.
  • Biodiversity in Australias biggest backyard: Urban bushland remnants in the Sydney Basin; Hochuli D; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Strategic Partnerships with Industry - Research and Training (SPIRT).

1999

  • SPIRT 2000: Biodiversity in Australia's biggest backyard: Urban bushland remnants in Sydney basin; Hochuli D.
  • Using Geographic Information Systems to investigate the relationship between the environment and biodiversity - linking information technology to biology; Hochuli D; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Strategic Partnerships with Industry - Research and Training (SPIRT).

Selected publications

Download citations: PDF RTF Endnote

Edited Books

  • Lunney, D., Hutchings, P., Hochuli, D. (2011). The Natural History of Sydney. Mosman NSW 2088: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales.

Book Chapters

  • Hochuli, D., Christie, F., Lomov, B. (2009). Invertebrate Biodiversity in Urban Landscapes: Assessing Remnant Habitat and its Restoration. In Mark J. McDonnell, Amy K. Hahs and Jurgen H. Breuste (Eds.), Ecology of cities and towns: A comparative approach. New York, USA: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wratten, S., Hochuli, D., Gurr, G., Tylianakis, J., Scarratt, S. (2007). Conservation, Biodiversity and Integrated Pest Management. Perspectives in ecological theory and integrated pest management, (pp. 223-224). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Hochuli, D., Gibb, H., Burrows, S., Christie, F. (2004). Ecology Of Sydney's Urban Fragments: Has Fragmentation Taken The Sting Out Of Insect Herbivory? In Not known (Eds.), Urban Wildlife: more than meets the eye, (pp. 63-69). Mosman: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales.

Journals

  • Low, P., McArthur, C., Fisher, K., Hochuli, D. (2014). Elevated volatile concentrations in high-nutrient plants: do insect herbivores pay a high price for good food? Ecological Entomology, 39(4), 480-491. [More Information]
  • Matias, M., Coleman, R., Hochuli, D., Underwood, A. (2013). Macrofaunal Responses to Edges Are Independent of Habitat-Heterogeneity in Experimental Landscapes. PLoS One, 8(4), 1-8. [More Information]
  • Low, P., Angus, W., Wagner, A., Wilkin, D., Shiels, M., Dockerill, R., Hochuli, D. (2013). Use of spider silk for nest building by the Regent Honeyeater Anthochaera phrygia and the Helmeted Honeyeater Lichenostomus melanops cassidix. Australian Zoologist, 36(3), 349-354. [More Information]
  • Powell, F., Hochuli, D., Symonds, C., Cassis, G. (2012). Are psyllids affiliated with the threatened plants Acacia ausfeldii, A. dangarensis and A. gordonii at risk of co-extinction? Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 37(1), 140-148. [More Information]
  • Powell, F., Hochuli, D., Cassis, G. (2011). A new host and additional localities for the rare psyllid Acizzia keithi Taylor and Moir (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). Australian Journal of Entomology, 50(4), 441-444. [More Information]
  • Matias, M., Underwood, A., Hochuli, D., Coleman, R. (2011). Habitat identity influences species-area relationships in heterogeneous habitats. Marine Ecology - Progress Series, 437, 135-145. [More Information]
  • Matias, M., Underwood, A., Hochuli, D., Coleman, R. (2010). Independent effects of patch size and structural complexity on diversity of benthic macroinvertebrates. Ecology, 91(7), 1908-1915. [More Information]
  • Lomov, B., Keith, D., Hochuli, D. (2010). Pollination and Plant Reproductive Success in Restored Urban Landscapes Dominated by a Pervasive Exotic Pollinator. Landscape and Urban Planning, 96, 232-239. [More Information]
  • Lomov, B., Keith, D., Hochuli, D. (2009). Linking ecological function to species composition in ecological restoration: Seed removal by ants in recreated woodland. Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 34, 751-760.
  • Blamires, S., Hochuli, D., Thompson, M. (2009). Prey protein influences growth and decoration building in the orb web spider Argiope keyserlingi. Ecological Entomology, 34, 545-550.
  • Christie, F., Hochuli, D. (2009). Responses of wasp communities to urbanization: effects on community resilience and species diversity. Journal of Insect Conservation, 13, 213-221.
  • Christie, F., Cassis, G., Hochuli, D. (2009). Urbanization affects the trophic structure of arboreal arthropod communities. Urban Ecosystems, , 1-12. [More Information]
  • Hochuli, D., Banks, P. (2008). Selection pressures on zoology teaching in Australian universities: student perceptions of zoological education and how to improve it. Australian Zoologist, 34(4), 544-553.
  • Lassau, S., Hochuli, D. (2008). Testing predictions of beetle community patterns derived empirically using remote sensing. Diversity and Distributions: a journal of conservation biogeography, 14(1), 138-147.
  • Blamires, S., Hochuli, D., Thompson, M. (2008). Why cross the web: decoration spectral properties and prey capture in an orb spider (Argiope keyserlingi) web. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 94(2), 221-229.
  • Lassau, S., Hochuli, D. (2007). Associations between wasp communities and forest structure: Do strong local patterns hold across landscapes? Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 32(6), 656-662.
  • Blamires, S., Hochuli, D., Thompson, M. (2007). Does decoration building influence antipredator responses in an orb-web spider (Argiope keyserlingi) in its natural habitat? Australian Journal of Zoology, 55(1), 1-7.
  • Reid, A., Hochuli, D. (2007). Grassland invertebrate assemblages in managed landscapes: Effect of host plant and microhabitat architecture. Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 32(6), 708-718.
  • Blamires, S., Thompson, M., Hochuli, D. (2007). Habitat selection and web plasticity by the orb spider Argiope keyserlingi (Argiopidae): Do they compromise foraging success for predator avoidance? Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 32(5), 551-563.
  • Lomov, B., Keith, D., Britton, D., Hochuli, D. (2006). Are butterflies and moths useful indicators for restoration monitoring? A pilot study in Sydney's Cumberland Plain Woodland. Ecological Management and Restoration, 7(3), 204-210.
  • Goldsbrough, C., Shine, R., Hochuli, D. (2006). Factors affecting retreat-site selection by coppertail skinks (Ctenotus taeniolatus) from sandstone outcrops in eastern Australia. Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 31(3), 326-336.
  • Tatarnic, N., Cassis, G., Hochuli, D. (2006). Traumatic insemination in the plant bug genus Coridromius Signoret (Heteroptera: Miridae). Biology Letters, 2(1), 58-61.
  • Lassau, S., Hochuli, D., Cassis, G., Reid, C. (2005). Effects of habitat complexity on forest beetle diversity: do functional groups respond consistently? Diversity and Distributions: a journal of conservation biogeography, 11(1), 73-82.
  • Christie, F., Hochuli, D. (2005). Elevated levels of herbivory in urban landscapes: are declines in tree health more than an edge effect? Ecology and Society, 10(1), 1-9.
  • Lassau, S., Cassis, G., Flemons, P., Wilkie, L., Hochuli, D. (2005). Using high-resolution multi-spectral imagery to estimate habitat complexity in open-canopy forests: can we predict ant community patterns? Ecography, 28(4), 495-504.
  • Lassau, S., Hochuli, D. (2005). Wasp community responses to habitat complexity in Sydney sandstone forests. Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 30(2), 179-187.
  • Lassau, S., Hochuli, D. (2004). Effects Of Habitat Complexity On Ant Assemblages. Ecography, 27(2), 157-164.
  • Goldsbrough, C., Hochuli, D., Shine, R. (2004). Fitness Benefits of Retreat-site selection: Spiders, Rocks, and Thermal Cues. Ecology, 85(6), 1635-1641.
  • Hochuli, D., Gibb, H. (2004). Removal Experiment Reveals Limited Effects Of A Behaviorally Dominant Species On Ant Assemblages. Ecology, 85(3), 648-657.
  • Gibb, H., Hochuli, D. (2003). Colonisation by a dominant ant facilitated by anthropogenic disturbance: effects on ant assemblage composition, biomass and resource use. Oikos: a journal of ecology, 103(3), 469-478.
  • Goldsbrough, C., Hochuli, D., Shine, R. (2003). Invertebrate biodiversity under hot rocks: habitat use by the fauna of sandstone outcrops in the Sydney region. Biological Conservation, 109(1), 85-93.
  • Gibb, H., Hochuli, D. (2003). Nest relocation in the golden spiny ant, Polyrhachis ammon: environmental cues and temporal castes. Insectes Sociaux, 50(4), 323-329. [More Information]
  • Reader, T., Hochuli, D. (2003). Understanding gregariousness in a larval Lepidopteran: The roles of host plant, predation, and microclimate. Ecological Entomology, 28(6), 729-737.
  • Gibb, H., Hochuli, D. (2002). Habitat fragmentation in an urban environment: large and small fragments support different arthropod assemblages. Biological Conservation, 106(1), 91-100.
  • Hochuli, D. (2001). Insect herbivory and ontogeny: How do growth and development influence feeding behaviour, morphology and host use? Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 26, 563-570.

Conferences

  • Lunney, D., Hutchings, P., Hochuli, D., Recher, H. (2010). Is the natural history of Sydney so camouflaged that it will not survive? Royal Zoological Society of NSW 2007 Forum "The Natural History of Sydney", Mosman, NSW: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales.

2014

  • Low, P., McArthur, C., Fisher, K., Hochuli, D. (2014). Elevated volatile concentrations in high-nutrient plants: do insect herbivores pay a high price for good food? Ecological Entomology, 39(4), 480-491. [More Information]

2013

  • Matias, M., Coleman, R., Hochuli, D., Underwood, A. (2013). Macrofaunal Responses to Edges Are Independent of Habitat-Heterogeneity in Experimental Landscapes. PLoS One, 8(4), 1-8. [More Information]
  • Low, P., Angus, W., Wagner, A., Wilkin, D., Shiels, M., Dockerill, R., Hochuli, D. (2013). Use of spider silk for nest building by the Regent Honeyeater Anthochaera phrygia and the Helmeted Honeyeater Lichenostomus melanops cassidix. Australian Zoologist, 36(3), 349-354. [More Information]

2012

  • Powell, F., Hochuli, D., Symonds, C., Cassis, G. (2012). Are psyllids affiliated with the threatened plants Acacia ausfeldii, A. dangarensis and A. gordonii at risk of co-extinction? Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 37(1), 140-148. [More Information]

2011

  • Powell, F., Hochuli, D., Cassis, G. (2011). A new host and additional localities for the rare psyllid Acizzia keithi Taylor and Moir (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). Australian Journal of Entomology, 50(4), 441-444. [More Information]
  • Matias, M., Underwood, A., Hochuli, D., Coleman, R. (2011). Habitat identity influences species-area relationships in heterogeneous habitats. Marine Ecology - Progress Series, 437, 135-145. [More Information]
  • Lunney, D., Hutchings, P., Hochuli, D. (2011). The Natural History of Sydney. Mosman NSW 2088: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales.

2010

  • Matias, M., Underwood, A., Hochuli, D., Coleman, R. (2010). Independent effects of patch size and structural complexity on diversity of benthic macroinvertebrates. Ecology, 91(7), 1908-1915. [More Information]
  • Lunney, D., Hutchings, P., Hochuli, D., Recher, H. (2010). Is the natural history of Sydney so camouflaged that it will not survive? Royal Zoological Society of NSW 2007 Forum "The Natural History of Sydney", Mosman, NSW: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales.
  • Lomov, B., Keith, D., Hochuli, D. (2010). Pollination and Plant Reproductive Success in Restored Urban Landscapes Dominated by a Pervasive Exotic Pollinator. Landscape and Urban Planning, 96, 232-239. [More Information]

2009

  • Hochuli, D., Christie, F., Lomov, B. (2009). Invertebrate Biodiversity in Urban Landscapes: Assessing Remnant Habitat and its Restoration. In Mark J. McDonnell, Amy K. Hahs and Jurgen H. Breuste (Eds.), Ecology of cities and towns: A comparative approach. New York, USA: Cambridge University Press.
  • Lomov, B., Keith, D., Hochuli, D. (2009). Linking ecological function to species composition in ecological restoration: Seed removal by ants in recreated woodland. Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 34, 751-760.
  • Blamires, S., Hochuli, D., Thompson, M. (2009). Prey protein influences growth and decoration building in the orb web spider Argiope keyserlingi. Ecological Entomology, 34, 545-550.
  • Christie, F., Hochuli, D. (2009). Responses of wasp communities to urbanization: effects on community resilience and species diversity. Journal of Insect Conservation, 13, 213-221.
  • Christie, F., Cassis, G., Hochuli, D. (2009). Urbanization affects the trophic structure of arboreal arthropod communities. Urban Ecosystems, , 1-12. [More Information]

2008

  • Hochuli, D., Banks, P. (2008). Selection pressures on zoology teaching in Australian universities: student perceptions of zoological education and how to improve it. Australian Zoologist, 34(4), 544-553.
  • Lassau, S., Hochuli, D. (2008). Testing predictions of beetle community patterns derived empirically using remote sensing. Diversity and Distributions: a journal of conservation biogeography, 14(1), 138-147.
  • Blamires, S., Hochuli, D., Thompson, M. (2008). Why cross the web: decoration spectral properties and prey capture in an orb spider (Argiope keyserlingi) web. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 94(2), 221-229.

2007

  • Lassau, S., Hochuli, D. (2007). Associations between wasp communities and forest structure: Do strong local patterns hold across landscapes? Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 32(6), 656-662.
  • Wratten, S., Hochuli, D., Gurr, G., Tylianakis, J., Scarratt, S. (2007). Conservation, Biodiversity and Integrated Pest Management. Perspectives in ecological theory and integrated pest management, (pp. 223-224). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Blamires, S., Hochuli, D., Thompson, M. (2007). Does decoration building influence antipredator responses in an orb-web spider (Argiope keyserlingi) in its natural habitat? Australian Journal of Zoology, 55(1), 1-7.
  • Reid, A., Hochuli, D. (2007). Grassland invertebrate assemblages in managed landscapes: Effect of host plant and microhabitat architecture. Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 32(6), 708-718.
  • Blamires, S., Thompson, M., Hochuli, D. (2007). Habitat selection and web plasticity by the orb spider Argiope keyserlingi (Argiopidae): Do they compromise foraging success for predator avoidance? Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 32(5), 551-563.

2006

  • Lomov, B., Keith, D., Britton, D., Hochuli, D. (2006). Are butterflies and moths useful indicators for restoration monitoring? A pilot study in Sydney's Cumberland Plain Woodland. Ecological Management and Restoration, 7(3), 204-210.
  • Goldsbrough, C., Shine, R., Hochuli, D. (2006). Factors affecting retreat-site selection by coppertail skinks (Ctenotus taeniolatus) from sandstone outcrops in eastern Australia. Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 31(3), 326-336.
  • Tatarnic, N., Cassis, G., Hochuli, D. (2006). Traumatic insemination in the plant bug genus Coridromius Signoret (Heteroptera: Miridae). Biology Letters, 2(1), 58-61.

2005

  • Lassau, S., Hochuli, D., Cassis, G., Reid, C. (2005). Effects of habitat complexity on forest beetle diversity: do functional groups respond consistently? Diversity and Distributions: a journal of conservation biogeography, 11(1), 73-82.
  • Christie, F., Hochuli, D. (2005). Elevated levels of herbivory in urban landscapes: are declines in tree health more than an edge effect? Ecology and Society, 10(1), 1-9.
  • Lassau, S., Cassis, G., Flemons, P., Wilkie, L., Hochuli, D. (2005). Using high-resolution multi-spectral imagery to estimate habitat complexity in open-canopy forests: can we predict ant community patterns? Ecography, 28(4), 495-504.
  • Lassau, S., Hochuli, D. (2005). Wasp community responses to habitat complexity in Sydney sandstone forests. Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 30(2), 179-187.

2004

  • Hochuli, D., Gibb, H., Burrows, S., Christie, F. (2004). Ecology Of Sydney's Urban Fragments: Has Fragmentation Taken The Sting Out Of Insect Herbivory? In Not known (Eds.), Urban Wildlife: more than meets the eye, (pp. 63-69). Mosman: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales.
  • Lassau, S., Hochuli, D. (2004). Effects Of Habitat Complexity On Ant Assemblages. Ecography, 27(2), 157-164.
  • Goldsbrough, C., Hochuli, D., Shine, R. (2004). Fitness Benefits of Retreat-site selection: Spiders, Rocks, and Thermal Cues. Ecology, 85(6), 1635-1641.
  • Hochuli, D., Gibb, H. (2004). Removal Experiment Reveals Limited Effects Of A Behaviorally Dominant Species On Ant Assemblages. Ecology, 85(3), 648-657.

2003

  • Gibb, H., Hochuli, D. (2003). Colonisation by a dominant ant facilitated by anthropogenic disturbance: effects on ant assemblage composition, biomass and resource use. Oikos: a journal of ecology, 103(3), 469-478.
  • Goldsbrough, C., Hochuli, D., Shine, R. (2003). Invertebrate biodiversity under hot rocks: habitat use by the fauna of sandstone outcrops in the Sydney region. Biological Conservation, 109(1), 85-93.
  • Gibb, H., Hochuli, D. (2003). Nest relocation in the golden spiny ant, Polyrhachis ammon: environmental cues and temporal castes. Insectes Sociaux, 50(4), 323-329. [More Information]
  • Reader, T., Hochuli, D. (2003). Understanding gregariousness in a larval Lepidopteran: The roles of host plant, predation, and microclimate. Ecological Entomology, 28(6), 729-737.

2002

  • Gibb, H., Hochuli, D. (2002). Habitat fragmentation in an urban environment: large and small fragments support different arthropod assemblages. Biological Conservation, 106(1), 91-100.

2001

  • Hochuli, D. (2001). Insect herbivory and ontogeny: How do growth and development influence feeding behaviour, morphology and host use? Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 26, 563-570.

To update your profile click here. For support on your academic profile contact .