student profile: Miss Hayley Cullen


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Thesis work

Thesis title: Inattentional blindness within the legal system

Supervisors: Helen PATERSON , Celine VAN GOLDE

Thesis abstract:

Inattentional blindness refers to a failure to notice an unexpected event when attention is paid to something else (Mack & Rock, 1998). Inattentional blindness can occur in many situations, such as in the case of crime, where both eyewitnesses and police officers may fail to detect a crime occurring due to engagement in another task. However, very little research has explored the factors that influence inattentional blindness for crime, and the effect that inattentional blindness may have on memory accuracy, susceptibility to post-event information, and juror decision-making. The current study aims to investigate the occurrence of inattentional blindness in eyewitnesses, police officers and jurors in order to understand how inattentional blindness impacts the legal system as a whole.

Selected publications

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Conferences

  • Cullen, H., Paterson, H., van Golde, C. (2017). Crime obviousness and awareness: Everyday distractions may reduce awareness even for obvious crime. Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition (SARMAC XII), Sydney: Unpublished.
  • van Golde, C., Paterson, H., Cullen, H., Marsh, A. (2017). Wait! When did he say that again? Adult memory for details of reoccurring events. Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition (SARMAC XII), Sydney: Unpublished.
  • Cullen, H., van Golde, C., Paterson, H. (2016). "Have you seen this child?": The effect of crime re-enactment on eyewitness memory. International Conference on Memory (ICOM-6), Hungary: International Conference on Memory (ICOM-6).

2017

  • Cullen, H., Paterson, H., van Golde, C. (2017). Crime obviousness and awareness: Everyday distractions may reduce awareness even for obvious crime. Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition (SARMAC XII), Sydney: Unpublished.
  • van Golde, C., Paterson, H., Cullen, H., Marsh, A. (2017). Wait! When did he say that again? Adult memory for details of reoccurring events. Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition (SARMAC XII), Sydney: Unpublished.

2016

  • Cullen, H., van Golde, C., Paterson, H. (2016). "Have you seen this child?": The effect of crime re-enactment on eyewitness memory. International Conference on Memory (ICOM-6), Hungary: International Conference on Memory (ICOM-6).

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