student profile: Mr Joel Bateman


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Thesis work

Thesis title: Factors Associated with Relational Binding

Supervisors: Sally ANDREWS , Damian BIRNEY

Thesis abstract:

Relational binding – the ability to connect multiple memory representations – is known to be fundamental to human cognition, allowing us to solve novel problems, comprehend language, and recognise perceptual similarities. There has been a particular interest in relational reasoning within the fluid intelligence literature however, comparatively few studies have explored the use of lower-order, perceptually-defined relational tasks. Recent evidence indicates that lower-order tasks are at least as predictive of fluid intelligence as more complex tasks, whilst affording us greater precision in determining the cognitive processes involved. The current project will investigate determinants of effective relational binding through experimental manipulations and eye tracking analysis, with the aim to discover if simple, lower-order binding tasks can predict higher-order tasks of relational reasoning. Factors proposed for investigation include complexity, identity, and proximity; and task designs aim to measure the difficulty in instantiating or maintaining a relation.

Selected publications

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Journals

  • Goldstein, M., Murray, S., Griffiths, S., Rayner, K., Podkowka, J., Bateman, J., Wallis, A., Thornton, C. (2016). The Effectiveness of Family-Based Treatment for Full and Partial Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa in an Independent Private Practice Setting: Clinical Outcomes. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 49(11), 1023-1026. [More Information]

2016

  • Goldstein, M., Murray, S., Griffiths, S., Rayner, K., Podkowka, J., Bateman, J., Wallis, A., Thornton, C. (2016). The Effectiveness of Family-Based Treatment for Full and Partial Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa in an Independent Private Practice Setting: Clinical Outcomes. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 49(11), 1023-1026. [More Information]

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