student profile: Mr Joel Bateman


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Thesis work

Thesis title: Determinants of Effective Relational Binding in Working Memory

Supervisors: Damian BIRNEY , Sally ANDREWS

Thesis abstract:

Working memory is a critical system of human cognition, allowing us to focus attention, store information, and flexibly solve complex problems. Although traditionally seen as a multi-componential system with distinct capacity-limited stores, there is a growing consensus that working memory is a more dynamic, attentional-based system limited by the ability to maintain and disengage from attended elements. Central to this maintenance and disengagement is the binding of elements to one-another using established or novel relations. Indeed, working memory tasks are often linked to higher-order reasoning tasks which require the abstraction of relations. Despite this, the nature of relational binding within working memory is not well understood. The current project will investigate determinants of effective relational binding through experimental manipulations and eye-tracking analysis. Factors proposed for investigation include complexity, salience, and systematicity; and task designs aim to measure the difficulty in instantiating or maintaining a relation.

Selected publications

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Journals

  • Goldstein, M., Murray, S., Griffiths, S., Rayner, K., Podkowka, J., Bateman, J., Wallis, A., Thornton, C. (2016). The Effectiveness of Family-Based Treatment for Full and Partial Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa in an Independent Private Practice Setting: Clinical Outcomes. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 49(11), 1023-1026. [More Information]

2016

  • Goldstein, M., Murray, S., Griffiths, S., Rayner, K., Podkowka, J., Bateman, J., Wallis, A., Thornton, C. (2016). The Effectiveness of Family-Based Treatment for Full and Partial Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa in an Independent Private Practice Setting: Clinical Outcomes. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 49(11), 1023-1026. [More Information]

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