student profile: Miss Juliana Chen


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Thesis work

Thesis title: Advancing dietetic practice through the integration of smartphone apps

Supervisors: Adrian BAUMAN , Margaret ALLMAN-FARINELLI

Thesis abstract:

The growing burden of obesity and its related chronic diseases demands wide-reaching and cost-effective solutions. Nutrition professionals, namely registered dietitians, have noted roles in evidence-based guidelines to deliver dietary counselling and lifestyle modifications for the management of overweight and obesity. However, dietetic support to address the obesity epidemic is limited by the small dietetic workforce and the intensive counselling required, compared with population numbers involved. With their ubiquity, portability and accessibility, mobile health (mHealth) technologies, such as smartphone applications (apps), can capture real-time, non-invasive data to inform understanding about individual, population and global health behavioural patterns allowing for more targeted personalised interventions and public health policies to be developed. Individuals in the public are readily adopted commercial health and fitness apps to track their health behaviours and wellbeing. There is willingness among these individuals to share personal health app data with researchers. However, the lack of access to patient health app data by health professionals is a major barrier to realising the potential of mHealth technologies in the improvement of healthcare service delivery and the management of patients more efficiency. Among international dietitians, 62% reported using health apps, namely nutrition apps, in their patient care, primarily as an information resource and for patient self-monitoring. Nevertheless, health apps were not used as an integral part of the nutrition care process nor for behaviour change, partly due to inadequate knowledge and awareness about the best apps to recommend. Provision of continuing professional development to increase the capabilities, skills and knowledge around the use of health apps is necessary to ensure the dietetic profession is able to effectively apply these mHealth technologies within their patient care. The impact of such continuing professional development and educational activities on dietitians’ confidence with using health apps, and the effect on patient outcomes and satisfaction towards dietetic services will be investigated.

Selected publications & creative works

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Journals

  • Chen, J., Lieffers, J., Bauman, A., Hanning, R., Allman-Farinelli, M. (2017). Designing Health Apps to Support Dietetic Professional Practice and Their Patients: Qualitative Results From an International Survey. JMIR mHealth and uHealth, 5(3), 1-13. [More Information]
  • Chen, J., Lieffers, J., Bauman, A., Hanning, R., Allman-Farinelli, M. (2017). The use of smartphone health apps and other mobile health (mHealth) technologies in dietetic practice: a three country study. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 30, 439-452. [More Information]
  • Chen, J., Bauman, A., Allman-Farinelli, M. (2016). A Study to Determine the Most Popular Lifestyle Smartphone Applications and Willingness of the Public to Share Their Personal Data for Health Research. Telemedicine and e-Health, 22(8), 655-665. [More Information]
  • Nour, M., Chen, J., Allman-Farinelli, M. (2016). Efficacy and External Validity of Electronic and Mobile Phone-Based Interventions Promoting Vegetable Intake in Young Adults: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 18(4), 1-19. [More Information]
  • Nour, M., Chen, J., Allman-Farinelli, M. (2015). Efficacy and External Validity of Electronic and Mobile Phone-Based Interventions Promoting Vegetable Intake in Young Adults: A Systematic Review Protocol. JMIR Research Protocols, 4(3), 1-7. [More Information]
  • Chen, J., Cade, J., Allman-Farinelli, M. (2015). The Most Popular Smartphone Apps for Weight Loss: A Quality Assessment. JMIR mHealth and uHealth, 3(4), 1-17. [More Information]

Research Reports

  • Kite, J., Chen, J., Zhao, J., Freeman, B., Allman-Farinelli, M., Li, M., Bellew, W. (2017). Mobile apps and health behaviour: A rapid evidence review, (pp. 5 - 45). Sydney, Australia: Physical Activity Nutrition Obesity Research Group (PANORG).

2017

  • Chen, J., Lieffers, J., Bauman, A., Hanning, R., Allman-Farinelli, M. (2017). Designing Health Apps to Support Dietetic Professional Practice and Their Patients: Qualitative Results From an International Survey. JMIR mHealth and uHealth, 5(3), 1-13. [More Information]
  • Kite, J., Chen, J., Zhao, J., Freeman, B., Allman-Farinelli, M., Li, M., Bellew, W. (2017). Mobile apps and health behaviour: A rapid evidence review, (pp. 5 - 45). Sydney, Australia: Physical Activity Nutrition Obesity Research Group (PANORG).
  • Chen, J., Lieffers, J., Bauman, A., Hanning, R., Allman-Farinelli, M. (2017). The use of smartphone health apps and other mobile health (mHealth) technologies in dietetic practice: a three country study. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 30, 439-452. [More Information]

2016

  • Chen, J., Bauman, A., Allman-Farinelli, M. (2016). A Study to Determine the Most Popular Lifestyle Smartphone Applications and Willingness of the Public to Share Their Personal Data for Health Research. Telemedicine and e-Health, 22(8), 655-665. [More Information]
  • Nour, M., Chen, J., Allman-Farinelli, M. (2016). Efficacy and External Validity of Electronic and Mobile Phone-Based Interventions Promoting Vegetable Intake in Young Adults: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 18(4), 1-19. [More Information]

2015

  • Nour, M., Chen, J., Allman-Farinelli, M. (2015). Efficacy and External Validity of Electronic and Mobile Phone-Based Interventions Promoting Vegetable Intake in Young Adults: A Systematic Review Protocol. JMIR Research Protocols, 4(3), 1-7. [More Information]
  • Chen, J., Cade, J., Allman-Farinelli, M. (2015). The Most Popular Smartphone Apps for Weight Loss: A Quality Assessment. JMIR mHealth and uHealth, 3(4), 1-17. [More Information]

Note: This profile is for a student at the University of Sydney. Views presented here are not necessarily those of the University.