The Quadrangle

The South Vestibule, East range (Lobby B)

The South Vestibule is part of the East range of the Quadrangle.


Images are courtesy of the University Secretariat unless otherwise indicated.


The front of the South Vestibule

The South Vestibule

The South Vestibule

The Clock Tower and the entrance
to the South Vestibule from University Place -
enlargement.

The South Vestibule - enlargement.


Decorative features include:

  • bosses on horizontal string course above the window.
  • a carving of a pelican below the roof gable - see below.
  • a finial topped by a lion on the gable roof facing the Clock Tower - view image.
  • gargoyles - unusual, fantastic, mythical or eerie carved creatures - see below.
  • Sir William Montagu Manning's coat of arms above the entrance door (Chancellor 1878 - 1895) and the motto underneath: "Viva ut vivas" (Live in order that you may live). On either side are his initials "WM" and "M" and floral motifs at each end - view image.
Carving of a pelican A gargoyle A frog gargoyle

A carving of a pelican below the
roof gable - enlargement 

 

A gargoyle above the
stained glass window -
enlargement 

A frog gargoyle above
the stained glass window -
enlargement.



Inside the South Vestibule

UPDATE: In 2011 the original 1850s staircase bannister shown below was replaced by a modern reproduction copy of the more elaborate bannister in the North Vestibule for safety reasons.

The South Vestibule View of the Elgin Marbles

View of the entrance to the South Vestibule
from University Place - enlargement.

View of the Elgin Marbles
in the South Vestibule - enlargement.

Plaque to Frederick Mate Entrance to the old Nicholson Museum

Above the doorway into the Quadrangle,
a plaque to a student who died in 1864 -
enlargement.

The entrance to the old Nicholson Museum -
enlargement.


Decorative features include:

  • plaster casts of six of the Parthenon Marbles on the walls - view images.
  • a cedar staircase which is less elaborately carved than the staircase in the North Vestibule - because of economies introduced during the later phases of the building. UPDATE: In 2011 this original staircase was pulled out and replaced by a modern reproduction copy of the bannister in the North Vestibule.
  • a large stained glass window which shows the University's coat of arms, coats of arms of Governors Bourke and Gipps as well as early benefactors and Fellows of Senate - view images.

History of the South Vestibule

The South Vestibule staircase and lobby and the landing over the lobby were completed in 1862 as part of the first University buildings - the East range and Great Hall.

The Laboratory Rooms were on the one side of the Vestibule, in the southern-most section of the East range. They housed the chemistry and physics laboratories and their storerooms until 1885 when the chemistry laboratory moved and 1890 when a new facility for chemistry lecture theatres and laboratory was built in Science Road (Pharmacy today).

The Museum of Antiquities (now the Oriental Studies Room, office and lobby) was on the other side, next to the Tower. The Museum moved in 1909 to accommodation below the new Fisher Library which had been built in the south-west corner of the Quadrangle.

Professor John Smith

Part of the Nicholson Museum

Part of the Nicholson Museum - enlargement,
photo, courtesy of the Macleay Museum,
University of Sydney

Self-portrait of Professor John Smith,
first Professor of Chemistry,
examining specimens of fleece
in his laboratory - enlargement,
photo, University Archives.  


View images and information about the Nicholson Museum - then and now.


LB