Research Grants

Cultures of Coast and Sea. Environmental, cultural and ethnographic histories of northern Australia, 1770-2010
Great Barrier Reef near Airlie Beach and Mackay

Using new cross-disciplinary approaches and methods, this collaboration between university scholars, museum curators and a philanthropic foundation will study the impact of maritime and marine environmental and cultural change on the peoples and habitats of the Great Barrier Reef and the Torres Strait from the eighteenth century to the present.

CI(s): Iain McCalman; Stephanie C. Anderson; Jude P. Philp; Michael Davis; Nigel P. Erskine; Michael Crayford

Grant:
2010-2013 : AUD929,236


Developing a legal framework for Indonesia's participation in an internationally sanctioned scheme for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation (and Degradation)

Indonesia is the world’s highest emitter of greenhouse gases, emanating from deforestation. International climate change negotiations have agreed that developing country emissions from deforestation need to be brought within the climate change legal framework. This Discovery project reviews the legal arrangements in Indonesia, including forestry legislation and the broader legal and policy framework, to support Indonesia’s participation in the internationally sanctioned scheme, and makes recommendations for reform.

CI(s): Rosemary Lyster; Timothy Stephens; E Peden; S.A. Butt

Grant:
2010-2012, AUD224,000


Evo-Devo and Echinoderm Development
starfish

Evolution of maternal provisioning in echinoderms: characterisation of egg nutrients and their roles in development.

CI(s): Maria Byrne; William Figueira

Grants:

  • 2007-2009 : AUD272,000 Evolution of maternal provisioning in echinoderms: characterisation of egg nutrients and their roles in development.
  • 2008-2010 : AUD369,000 Development and calcification in benthic marine invertebrates (Mollusca and Echinodermata) in an acidified and warm ocean.
  • 2011-2012 : AUD195,786 Multigenerational impact of climate change on marine life histories.
  • 2010-2013 : AUD378,000 Machine assisted, multi-scale spatial and temporal observation and modelling of marine benthic habitats.
  • 2009-2011 : AUD90,000 Vulnerability of Antarctic marine benthos to increased temperature and ocean acidification.

Impact of climate change stressors on calcifying and non-calcifying marine life stages

As the oceans simultaneously warm, acidify, increase in pCO2 and decrease in carbonate saturation due to climate change, prospects for marine biota are of concern, particularly early life history stages. These factors are deleterious to marine life and are likely to have negative interactive effects, which are not understood. In carefully controlled multistressor experiments we investigate the synergistic impacts of climate change stressors on calcifying and non-calcifying life stages of ecologically important marine invertebrates. Investigation of species from the tropics to the poles will generate key insights into biological responses and tipping points in a changing ocean.
Project Start: 01 January 2009

CI(s): Maria Byrne; Symon A. Dworjanyn

Grants:

  • 2011-2013 : AUD390,000 Impact of climate change stressors on calcifying and non-calcifying marine life stages: predicting tipping points in a changing ocean.
  • 2009-2011 : AUD90,000 Vulnerability of Antarctic marine benthos to increased temperature and ocean acidification.

Population biology, ecology and genetic connectivity

The life history basis for the maintenance of populations of benthic marine invertebrates, their genetic connectivity and invasive potential typically involves a dispersive propagule and, for the vast majority of species, these propagules are larvae. In this project we investigate connectivity of sea star populations in eastern Australia from the Asterinidae, an asteroid family with the greatest diversity of life histories known for the Echinodermata and marine invertebrates in general. Evolution of development, larval form and mating systems have been major forces in speciation in the Asterinidae. We use this diversity as a model system to investigate the consequences of different systems and larval forms (benthic-planktonic, long and short planktonic duration on population genetic structure.

CI: Maria Byrne

Grants:

  • 2007-2009 : AUD272,000 Evolution of maternal provisioning in echinoderms: characterisation of egg nutrients and their roles in development.
  • 2008-2010 : AUD369,000 Development and calcification in benthic marine invertebrates (Mollusca and Echinodermata) in an acidified and warm ocean.
  • 2011-2012 : AUD195,786 Multigenerational impact of climate change on marine life histories.
  • 2010-2013 : AUD378,000 Machine assisted, multi-scale spatial and temporal observation and modelling of marine benthic habitats.
  • 2009-2011 : AUD90,000 Vulnerability of Antarctic marine benthos to increased temperature and ocean acidification.

Rethinking climate justice in an age of adaptation: capabilities, local variation, and public deliberation

This project aims to produce recommendations, designed by citizens and stakeholders, for climate adaptation policies in three regions of Australia. These recommendations will be based on a definition of climate justice that incorporates basic needs and resources to be protected, as identified by potentially impacted communities.

CIs: David Schlosberg; Simon J. Niemeyer

Grant:
DP120104797 2012-2014 : AUD250,000 Rethinking climate justice in an age of adaptation: capabilities, local variation, and public deliberation.


Sustainable organisational change: Australian business responses to climate change

Australian businesses are expected to play a leading role in the fight against global warming. This project will generate new insights into how, though organisational change initiatives, Australian corporations are responding to the issue of climate change, as well as the sustainability of these initiatives.

CIs: Christopher Wright; David S. Grant; Bernt D. Nyberg; Richard W. Dunford

Grant:
2012-2013 : AUD190,000


The Sydney Network on Climate Change and Society

Climate change in particular is widely seen as the most urgent expression of this problem. While many of the efforts of climate change scholars have rightly focused on bringing attention to potential impacts and attempting to prevent broad change, the evidence now indicates that change has arrived, and will continue and expand. The cross-disciplinary human and social implications of these developments are broad, interrelated – and underdeveloped. In the coming years, what we mean by ‘the environment’ will be both irreversibly changed and ever changing, with profound consequences for nature, the social world, and their complex interactions. Reverting to a more ‘natural’ or familiar world is not an option; the challenge ahead lies in how human societies understand and adapt to the changes we have wrought to both nature and ourselves.

CI: David Schlosberg

Grant:
2012-2013 : $400,428

Collaborators in the Sydney Network on Climate Change and Society Research Grant

Fiona Allon

Howard Bamsey

Alison Bashford

Maria Byrne

Danielle Celermajer

Lynne Chester

Linda Connor

Michael Davis

Caitlin De Berigny Wall

William Figueira

Jodi Frawley

Paul Giles

Nicole Gurran

Ian Johnson

Tess Lea

Rosemary Lyster

Peter Marks

Iain McCalman

John Mikler

Phil McManus

Jeffrey Neilson

Bill Pritchard

Elspeth Probyn

David Schlosberg

Krishna Shrestha

Vanessa Smith

Timothy Stephens

Jody Webster

Christopher Wright


 

 



Tropical Invertebrates: Biology, Ecology & Phylogeny
Maria Byrne fieldwork image

Our research in tropical Australia investigates the ecology of echinoderms of the Great Barrier Reef and else where in the Indo-Pacific. Recent studies have involved, molecular phylogeny, biodiversity, species discovery, the population biology of the crown of thorns sea star, larval evolution and reproductive biology of ophiuroids and the ecology of bêche-de-mer sea cucumbers. For the commercial sea cucumbers our research aims to understanding their biodiversity the GBR and for management, conservation and sustainable use of these organisms.

CIs: Maria Byrne; William Figueira

Grants:

  • DP0452133 2007-2009 : AUD272,000 Evolution of maternal provisioning in echinoderms: characterisation of egg nutrients and their roles in development.
  • 2008-2010 : AUD369,000 Development and calcification in benthic marine invertebrates (Mollusca and Echinodermata) in an acidified and warm ocean.
  • 2011-2012 : AUD195,786 Multigenerational impact of climate change on marine life histories.
  • 2010-2013 : AUD378,000 Machine assisted, multi-scale spatial and temporal observation and modelling of marine benthic habitats.