Selection criteria

Flagship projects

Selection criteria Application guidelines
The project addresses a strategic challenge/issue and there is rationale for the proposed approach that draws on previous/existing work. Challenge: Describe the challenge or need that will be addressed. Explain why this is important. Link to the Faculty/Division strategic goal. Explain what is currently known about the challenge. What is the specific aim of the project? How will the project build on, enhance or replicate prior work?
A convincing action/solution is articulated. If research-based, then a clear and appropriate research methodology consistent with the scale of the research question, including identification of partners or data sources, and data collection and analysis strategies. Solution: Describe how the challenge will be addressed. What is your action/solution? What is your project design? Provide an argument for why this method/approach will be effective.
The project plan, timeline and budget are realistic and achievable across the two phases of the timeline. The Faculty or Division may also commit resources to the project. Funds cannot be rolled over, they are subject to external rant funding and reporting requirements. Outline the project plan, timeline and rationale for the budget. What outcomes and deliverable products are expected? Outline the resources that the Faculty or Division will commit to the project (may be in-kind).
There are arrangements proposed to ensure rigorous evaluation, dissemination and sustainability of project outcomes. Include a plan for long-term sustainability.

Evaluation, dissemination and sustainability:

Describe how you will evaluate whether the project succeeded in addressing the strategic challenge. If successful, is there a plan for the Faculty/Division to sustain the project's outcomes/activities? Who are the key audiences interested in this project? How will you disseminate findings to those audiences?

The application meets the submission requirements.

Project is either multi-Faculty or cross-disciplinary.

Project builds on/expands existing good practice within the university.

Applicants who are participating in a current Widening Participation grant have shown evidence of progress towards achieving outcomes.

Submitted via online form.

Letters of support/signed off by department heads to show support for the project and support for the time commitments of all team members.

New partnerships with schools discussed with the SIU.

Projects have an undergraduate focus.

Implementation projects

Selection criteria Application guidelines
The project addresses a strategic challenge/issue and there is rationale for the proposed approach that draws on previous/existing work. Challenge: Describe the challenge or need that will be addressed. Explain why the challenge is important. Explain what is currently known about the challenge and the ability of the strategy to assess it.
A convincing action/solution is articulated. Convincing evidence from previous evaluation of the strategy is presented and a convincing case is made for why it will work in the new context. Solution: Describe how the demonstrated strategy from another context that will address the challenge. Provide an argument for why this approach/method will be effective. Explain how the project builds on, enhances or replicates prior work.
The project plan, timeline and budget are realistic and achievable across the two phases of the timeline. All funds allocated for phase one of the project must be spent 30 November 2013. Funds for phase two must be spent by 30 November 2014. Funds cannot be rolled over, they are subject to external grant funding and reporting requirements. Outline the project plan, timeline and rationale for the budget. What outcomes and deliverable products are expected?
There are arrangements proposed to ensure rigorous evaluation, dissemination and sustainability of project outcomes.

Evaluation, dissemination and sustainability:

Describe how you will evaluate whether the project succeeded in addressing the strategic challenge. If successful, is there a plan for the Faculty/Division to sustain the project's outcomes/activities? Who are the key audiences interested in this project? How will you disseminate findings to those audiences?

The application meets the submission requirements.

Applicants who are participating in a current Widening Participation grant have shown evidence of progress towards achieving outcomes.

Submitted via online form.

Letters of support/signed off by department heads to show support for the project and support for the time commitments of all team members.

New partnerships with schools discussed with the SIU.

Projects have an undergraduate focus.

Dissemination of funds

There is some funding available for team members from Widening Participation projects to present project outcomes at conferences. Please contact Mary Teague for further information.

Project themes

Flagship projects must address the first theme and may also address themes two, three or four. Implementation projects should address themes one, two and/or four:

  1. Community Engagement for Widening Participation Partnerships:
    Support for Faculties or Divisions in the introduction of new or expansion of existing partnership activities with schools or communities with a goal of widening participation. Successful proposals will include intentional, curriculum-based strategies (such as self-learning) to engage university students and staff in activities designed to raise aspirations, improve academic preparation, raise awareness of course choices, or increase familiarity with higher education culture, or similar objectives. These activities may be conducted in urban, suburban or rural locations, and/or focus on specific populations such as indigenous communities.
  2. Inclusive Curriculum Renewal:
    Support for implementation and integration of inclusive teaching strategies into curricula and teaching. Examples include (but are not limited to) implementing strategies to create more inclusive classroom environments, learning about students as learners, developing inclusive assessment strategies, peer mentoring or peer assessment, group learning strategies, student led and negotiated curricula design, peer and other forms of collaborative learning.
  3. Research on Inclusion/Exclusion:
    Research on topics such as community contexts and issues that affect the educational progression of young people in disadvantaged circumstances; issues of inclusion/exclusion in the context of university teaching and curriculum; and evaluation research on university/community strategies intended to widen participation in higher education.
  4. Wingara Mura Priority Area:
    Projects aligned with local implementation plan that also meet Widening Participation grant criteria.