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Award Announcements

The Sir Zelman Cowen Universities Fund Prize For Discovery in Medical Research established in 2005 recognises discovery in medical research, by a researcher under 45 years of age, which makes a major contribution to the understanding or treatment of disease. It is awarded in alternate years at the University of Sydney and at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The inaugural award in 2006 was made at the University of Sydney.

2013 Award

 

The 2013 SZCUF Prize for Discovery in Medical Research has been awarded to:

Associate Professor Eran Meshorer
Associate Professor Eran Meshorer
Department of Genetics, The Institute of Life Sciences
Hebrew University

Associate Professor Meshorer was nominated for his work on how embryonic stem cells (ESCs) maintain their dual capacity to both self renew, and differentiate to all cell types. Many of his studies have focused on the role of chromatin in this process as he believes that understanding the mechanisms that regulate chromatin function will enable intelligent manipulations of embryonic stem cells in the future. He has said, "If we can apply this new understanding about the mechanisms that give embryonic stem cells their plasticity, then we can increase or decrease the dynamics of the proteins that bind DNA and thereby increase or decrease the cells' differentiation potential. This could expedite the use of embryonic stem cells in cell therapy and regenerative medicine, by enabling the creation of cells in the laboratory which could be implanted in humans to cure diseases characterized by cell death, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, diabetes and other degenerative diseases."

Further information about Associate Professor Meshorer’s work can be found here.

B’nai B’rith

The 2013 Award has been sponsored by B’nai B’rith Lodge Sydney.




The last call for nominations for the Prize was announced in August 2013. It was for scientists working at the University of Sydney.


Schwartz Foundation Logo

The 2014 award of the Sir Zelman Cowen Universities Fund Prize for Discovery in Medical Research will be sponsored by The Schwartz Foundation.

2012 Award

 

The 2012 Award was won by Associate Professor Barry Slobedman, Discipline of Infectious Diseases & Immunology, University of Sydney Centre for Virus Research and Westmead Millennium Institute.

Associate Professor Slobedman was nominated for discoveries which have profoundly changed our understanding of how the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) can persist in a dormant state for the life of the human host, despite the presence of a huge anti-viral immune response. He has shown that CMV actively avoids detection during its dormant state by adopting an altered form making it unrecognisable to the T-cells designed to fight it. This discovery provides a novel drug target for development of therapies to interrupt the dormant state of infection, and so limit or prevent the devastating consequences of reactivation from dormancy in immunocompromised individuals such as transplant patients.

In addition, these discoveries have great significance for unborn babies as, CMV is the number one infectious disease that occurs in the developing fetus during pregnancy. Though CMV has been rarely heard of, it can lead to interuterine death (stillbirth), or birth of babies with profound neurological defects, such as mental retardation and hearing loss. It causes more serious disease than Down Syndrome, neural tube defects such as spinal bifida, and fetal alcohol syndrome despite the fact that the pregnant women usually have no symptoms of infection, and so are oblivious to the damage being caused by this virus to their developing fetus.

Professor Slobedman’s discoveries may also lead to development of a live CMV vaccine. The potential of these discoveries for clinical applications has led to an international patent sponsored by Sydnovate, the commercial arm of the University of Sydney.

Further information about A/Prof Slobedman’s work can be found here.

The Schwartz Foundation Logo

The 2012 Award of the Sir Zelman Cowen Universities Fund Prize for Discovery in Medical Research was sponsored byThe Schwartz Foundation.

2011 Award

 

The award of the 2011 Prize was shared by two scientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem:

Dr Eli Pikarsky, Hadassah Medical School and Assoc Prof Sigal Ben-Yehuda, Faculty of Medicine.

Dr Pikarsky was nominated for insights gained from his work in complex mouse models, into the development of human diseases. In particular, his work has yielded new understanding of the determinants of malignancy in testicular cancer; of the impact of inflammation on the progress of liver cancer and the regulation of liver regeneration, important in all conditions which damage liver function.

Assoc Prof Ben-Yehuda was nominated for her contributions to our understanding of the biology of bacteria. Her discoveries, which include the demonstration of a previously unknown ‘nanotube’ form of communication between cells, are also fundamental for understanding the mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. This gives her work great importance for the treatment of infections caused by the growing number of resistant bacteria.

This is the first time the award was shared between two nominees. In awarding the Prize to be shared between the two scientists, the Prize Committee noted the impressive contributions both scientists had made to our understanding of complex and difficult diseases.

Further information about Dr Pikarsky’s work can be found here.

Further information about Assoc Prof Ben-Yehuda’s work can be found here or by contacting the Fund's office.

The Schwartz Foundation Logo

2010 Award

 

The 2010 Award to Dr Rachel Codd, Discipline of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney was presented by Dr Jerry Schwartz of The Schwartz Foundation, sponsor of the 2010 award of the Prize at a luncheon jointly hosted by the Fund and the NSW Friends of the Hebrew University.

Dr Codd was nominated for the development of a range of compounds that may be effective in treating iron overload disease with orally administrable drugs compared with current therapy requiring intravenous infusion. The compounds may also have application in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, where irregular iron levels have been implicated as contributing factors.

Further information about Dr Codd’s work can be found here or by contacting the Fund's office.

Schwartz Foundation Logo

The 2010 award of the Sir Zelman Cowen Universities Fund Prize
for Discovery in Medical Research was sponsored by
The Schwartz Foundation.

2009 Award

 

In June 2009 the Award was presented to:

Dr Adi Mizrachi
Department of Neurobiology
The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences
Hebrew University of Jerusalem


Dr Mizrachi was nominated for his contribution to the understanding of synapse formation (nerve connections) in the central nervous system (CNS), and for the importance of his group's findings for the development of techniques of CNS repair. These new approaches developed by Dr Mizrachi's team are essential steps towards therapies which will allow the regeneration of brain structures from stem cell technology

The significance of Dr Mizrachi's work has been acknowledged by its publication and citation in many highly ranked journals, and by invitations to present his findings at many international conferences.

Further information about Dr Mizrachi's work can be found here and here or by contacting the Fund's office.

2008 Award

 

The 2008 Award to Dr Catherine Leamey, Discipline of Physiology,
School of Medical Sciences, University of Sydney was presented by Mr Malcolm Turnbull, MP at a special event in November 2008 which also celebrated the 30th Anniversary of the Fund’s inception.

Dr Leamey ‘s work was nominated for the identification of a gene, Ten_m3, which is essential for binocular vision and which has been shown to have important implications for the development of therapies for both visual and developmental brain disorders such as autism and mental retardation The award to Dr Leamey recognises the potential of her findings to aid in the development of new approaches in the treatment of these conditions.

Further information on Dr Leamey's project can be found here or by contacting the Fund's office.

Schwartz Foundation Logo


The 2008 award of the Sir Zelman Cowen Universities Fund Prize
for Discovery in Medical Research was sponsored by
The Schwartz Foundation.

2007 Award

 

In June 2007 the Award was presented to Professor Nir Friedman from the School of Engineering and Computer Sciences at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Professor Friedman is a leading expert in the field of machine learning and its application to biology. Machine learning is the prime tool in the analysis of the vast array of genomic data made available by the completion of the Human Genome Project.

Professor Friedman's work was selected for its broad application to many fields of medicine. He was the first recipient of the Prize at the Hebrew University.

Read about Professor Friedman's work

2006 Award

 

The inaugural award of the Prize was made in August 2006 to Mr Mark Elkins, Research Physiotherapist at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney who, at the time of the award, was a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Sydney. His award-winning research established a new, low-cost, long-term therapy for cystic fibrosis through a multi-centre, randomised, clinical trial.

Read more about the project