Disorder - Umbilical hernia

Organ Systems Involved
Musculoskeletal

Brief Description
    Contents of the abdomen protrude out through the umbilical ring (the belly button) but are contained under the skin.

Presenting Signs
    In this disorder a soft mass covered with skin and other tissue protrudes from the underside of the belly where the umbilical cord has been cut. Usually these hernias are small and do not cause a problem. Occasionally a part of the intestine will be in the hernia, and this can cause a painful obstruction to normal bowel function. If this is the case the dog will be vomiting, have abdominal pain, lose its appetite and may be depressed. Some umbilical hernias repair themselves or, being small, don't need to be surgically repaired until the dog is desexed.

Dogs at Risk
    Young dogs

Groups Affected
Gundog
Hound
Terrier
Toy
Utility
Working dog


Breeds Affected
Airedale terrier
Akita
American cocker spaniel
Australian cattle dog
Australian shepherd
Basenji
Basset hound
Bernese mountain dog
Bouvier de Flandres
Bull terrier
Collie (Rough and Smooth)
English pointer
English springer spaniel
Hungarian vizsla
King Charles spaniel
Pekingese
Weimaraner


Treatment
    Surgical

Related Disorders
    Abdominal hernias

PubMed References
Umbilical hernia

Further Reference Material [OMIA Number]
465


Contributor
Rachelle Hergenhan