Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What makes this degree different to other degrees offered in Wildlife studies?
  2. Do I need to be a veterinarian to qualify for this degree? What type of undergraduate qualification do I need to have?
  3. Do I have to live on-campus in Sydney or is there a distance option for this degree?
  4. What type of jobs will be available to me upon completion of this degree?
  5. How do I qualify for the shorter 48 credit point version of this degree?
  6. I have already worked extensively as a volunteer in wildlife organisations. What can this degree add to my experience?
  7. Are there any extra costs for the intensive learning sessions?
  8. Are there any scholarships available for this program?
  9. What type of animals am I likely to encounter during the fieldwork?
  10. What areas of research can I be involved with in my research project? Can I choose my own?
  11. Do I have to take the courses in a particular sequence? When can I begin my research project?
  12. If I live off campus what transportation options are there to get to Camden and the other locations where the units of study take place?

What makes this degree different to other degrees offered in Wildlife studies?
  • You will learn by doing. All teaching is centred on field, laboratory, or computer-based ongoing research activities the results of which will have real world outcomes. This degree is based on units of study which provide intensive field study sessions.
  • You will be taught by world renowned experts who are actively involved in the field, including experts from government, academia, and private industry. Because of the very small class size, you will receive an education that is tailored to your interests.
  • You will be studying in one of the most ecologically diverse and beautiful areas in the world.
  • Upon completion you will have a comprehensive set of tools for managing wildlife populations, and these skills will provide you with job opportunities in government, the not-for-profit sector and the private sector or opportunities to enter PhD programs.
  • The Masters is flexible and can be completed in 1 or 1.5 years, or part time over multiple years.

Do I need to be a veterinarian to qualify for this degree? What type of undergraduate qualification do I need to have?

This course is designed for students who have completed an undergraduate degree in science with a major in biology, agriculture, ecology or conservation. It will also appeal to veterinary graduates who have an interest in Conservation and wildlife. Those students with a sufficient grade point average and some research training can enrol in the 48 credit Masters program. Those without research courses or experience or a lower GPA are eligible for the 72 credit Masters program. We would encourage potential students to contact the Academic Support Unit if you would like to ask any questions about this.


Do I have to live on-campus in Sydney or is there a distance option for this degree?

Where you live will depend on your circumstances and whether you take the 48 credit or 72 credit Masters. The first semester of the 72 credit unit of study will have classes on the Sydney campus and living in Sydney may be more convenient for you. The intensive one-week units of study that make up the the 48 credit Masters two-thirds of the 72 credit Masters occur at multiple sites, and living arrangements during the courses are provided for most of them. Therefore during these two semesters where you live is more flexible.


What type of jobs will be available to me upon completion of this degree?

Based on the success of our previous graduates, your study will prepare you for entry into jobs in private industry, not-for-profit organizations, zoos and wildlife parks, academia, and government at all levels, from applied work in State and National Parks to policy development at the minister’s level. If you are already employed in these fields, the Wildlife Masters will provide you with new opportunities for growth and promotion. For those of you who are interested in obtaining a PhD, the Wildlife Masters allows you to identify fields of study and investigators with who you would like to work, and gives you strong credentials allowing entry into top quality programs.


How do I qualify for the shorter 48 credit point version of this degree?

If you have a sufficient grade point average and have taken course work with a significant research component, graduated with honours, have another master’s degree, or have a veterinary degree, you may be eligible for the 48 credit point version of the Master’s in Wildlife Health and Population Management.
When you submit your application for this degree program, your qualifications will be automatically assessed and if you have what is termed a Level 8 degree, you will be given credit for 24 credit points. If there is any uncertainty about the nature of your undergraduate degree, we may ask for further documentation. Please include any copies of research you have been involved with as part of your submission.


I have already worked extensively as a volunteer in wildlife organisations. What can this degree add to my experience?

The Wildlife Masters is designed to challenge you and expand your knowledge and skill base no matter what experience level you have when you enter the program.


Are there any extra costs for the intensive learning sessions?

For three of the six intensive units of study, there will be small additional costs (usually less than $200) for onsite living arrangements. Free housing will be supplied for two other units of study and the remaining unit of study will be held on the Camden Campus and can be reached by public transportation or car pool.


Are there any scholarships available for this program?

There are no scholarships on offer for this degree at present. If any become available we will post them on the Master of Wildllife Health and Population Management website.
If you are an international student, you may find that there are options at the Scholarships Office website


What type of animals am I likely to encounter during the fieldwork?

During our field work you will encounter a broad range of native Australian birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians. In the greater Sydney area it is possible to see over 200 species of birds including many sea birds that cannot readily be found anywhere else in the world. In our field studies you will see koalas, platypus, brush-tailed possums, eastern grey kangaroos, swamp wallabies, wallaroos, wombats, grey-headed flying foxes, and several species of microbat. In October during one unit of study we saw 8 species of reptiles and 10 species of frogs. While at Western Plains Zoo during the WILD5006 Ex-Situ Wildlife Management unit you will encounter a wide range of native and African wildlife.


What areas of research can I be involved with in my research project? Can I choose my own?

We have projects that relate to koalas, platypus, macropods, wombats, birds, frogs, and even invertebrates, e.g., the Cumberland land snail. These can range from ecology-based, to genetics, to health-related projects. Most will be focused on issues that relate to the local ecosystems including the Blue Mountains Wilderness Heritage area, the Sydney Basin, and the Southern Highlands, although some projects are more wide ranging. You are free to discuss any ideas or current involvements you have regarding research projects with your academic supervisor.


Do I have to take the courses in a particular sequence? When can I begin my research project?

If you are studying full time in the 48 credit Masters, then you will need to take the courses in a specific order. Introduction to Australian wildlife (WILD5001 and 5002), Wildlife Health (WILD5003) and In Situ Conservation (WILD5005) are taken in Semester 2 and Vetebrate Pest Management (WILD5004) and Ex Situ Conservation (WILD5006) are given in Semester 1 of the following year. Students begin their research in the intersemester break and finish by the end of Semester 1.
If you are studying part time, then the order of the units of study that you take is somewhat flexible.

If you are going to take the 72 credit Masters then you must finish your pre-requisite courses before taking the other WILD units.


If I live off campus what transportation options are there to get to Camden and the other locations where the units of study take place?

If you are not going to live in the Camden area, you can live in Sydney or surrounding suburbs and commute in for intensive sessions and other study related activities. There is a train from the Sydney precinct which goes to Campbelltown and a bus which runs in peak times to the Camden campus. Alternatively, having a car while you are here can solve many problems!

If an intensive session is located a greater distance from Camden, car pooling has always worked effectively to get students to the locations necessary. Your facilitator will give plenty of notice to students before the session to organise this.