DANGEROUS GOODS DEPOTS

Dangerous goods are substances or articles (not only chemicals) that pose a risk to people, property or the environment due to their physical or chemical properties (eg. explosive, flammable, toxic, corrosive, environmentally hazardous). Dangerous goods are usually classified with reference to the immediate hazard they pose rather than the long-term effects.

A dangerous goods depot is facility (or location) where a specific class of dangerous good is stored or used in a substantial quantity. Dangerous goods depots include:

  • separate roofed stores
  • storage rooms within a building
  • chemical storage cabinets - internal and external
  • external storage areas (eg. gas cages)
  • Bulk storage tanks (eg. liquid nitrogen).

Classification of dangerous goods

Here is a list of dangerous goods classes (excluding the sub-classes for explosives):

 

Class 1 - Explosives Class 5.1 - Oxidising Substances 
Class 2.1 - Flammable Gases Class 5.2 - Organic peroxides
Class 2.2 - Non-flammable, non-toxic gases Class 6.1 - Toxic substances
Class 2.3 - Toxic gases Class 6.2 - Infectious substances
Class 3 - Flammable liquids Class 7 - Radioactive substances
Class 4.1 - Flammable solids Class 8 - Corrosive substances
Class 4.2 - Substances liable to spontaneous combustion Class 9 - Miscellaneous dangerous goods and articles
Class 4.3 - Dangerous when wet  

Proper shipping names and UN numbers
Proper shipping names and UN numbers are used worldwide for the quick identification of dangerous goods. The University is required to use this standard terminology when submitting information to WorkCover and communicating with emergency services personnel about dangerous goods.

Packing groups
Packing groups are used to indicate the degree of danger associated with dangerous goods within a given class.

Packing Group I - Great Danger
Packing Group II - Medium Danger
Packing Group III - Minor Danger

Placarding and signage

Placards provide a visual warning of the hazards associated with the storage of dangerous goods. These are particularly important for emergency services personnel such as the fire brigade. Placards must be installed where dangerous goods are used or stored in volumes that exceed the threshold quantities detailed below.

 

Dangerous Goods Packing Group Placard Threshold Quantities
Class 2.1 N/A 10 x G Size Gas Cylinders
Class 2.2 N/A 100 x G Size Cylinders
Class 2.2/5.1 N/A 40 x G Size Cylinders
Class 2.3 N/A 1 x G Size Cylinder
Cryogenic Fluids N/A 1000 L
Class 3, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 5.1, 5.2, 6.1, or 8

  I

 II

III

50 L or Kg

250 L or Kg

1 000 L or Kg

Class 9

II

III

1 000 L of Kg

5 000 L or Kg

C1 Combustible Liquids

Stored with other fire risk dangerous goods

1 000 L

Stored separately in bulk 10 000 L

Stored separately in packages

50 000 L
Mixed Classes of Dangerous Goods where none of the individual classes exceed the limits above.

N/A

2 000 L or Kg

There are two types of placards required at the University.

Outer warning signs - these are positioned at the main entrances to buildings where dangerous goods are stored in volumes greater than placard quantities.

HAZCHEM

Placards at storage locations - the relevant dangerous goods diamonds must be displayed on or near each storage location that exceeds placard quantities.

Toxic sign
Corrosive sign
Flammable sign

Depot design requirements

Dangerous goods depots must be designed to comply with the relevant Australian Standards (eg. AS1940 for Flammable Liquids).

Planning for the refurbishment of an existing dangerous goods depot or the design of a new dangerous goods depots must be carried out in consultation with Campus Infrastructure Services, Work Health & Safety Services (WHS Services) and a consultant accredited with the Australian Institute of Dangerous Goods Consultants.

Risk assessments

Risk assessment must be carried out for each storage location or process that contains more than placard quantities.

The risk assessment must address:

  • potential spillage or leakage
  • fires and explosions
  • incompatibility of goods
  • plant used in or around the storage area
  • impact of an incident on the surrounding area (including adjacent buildings)
  • risks associated with occassional work such as repairs and maintenance; and
  • security of the dangerous goods in use or storage.

WorkCover notifications

Where dangerous goods are used or stored in volumes greater than the threshold quantities detailed below, WorkCover NSW must be notified, and manifests and emergency plans must be developed.

Dangerous Goods Packing Group Manifest Threshold Quantities
Class 2.1 N/A 100 x G Size Gas Cylinders
Class 2.2 N/A 200 x G Size Cylinders
Class 2.2/5.1 N/A 200 x G Size Cylinders
Class 2.3 N/A 10 x G Size Cylinder
Cryogenic Fluids N/A 10,000 L
Class 3, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 5.1, 5.2, 6.1, or 8

I

II

III

500 L or Kg

2 500 L or Kg

10 000 L or Kg

Class 9

II

III

10 000 L of Kg

10 000 L or Kg

C1 Combustible Liquids Stored with other fire risk dangerous goods 10 000 L
Stored separately in bulk 100 000 L
Stored separately in packages 100 000 L
Mixed Classes of Dangerous Goods where none of the individual classes exceed the limits above.

N/A

10 000 L or Kg

Due to the large number of dangerous goods depots at the University, the University is required to submit annual notifications. WHS Services regularly seeks summary inventory data from the University dapartments that manage dangerous goods depots and uses this information to compile summary manifests and site plans for submission to WorkCover.

The dangerous goods manifest data is stored within the University's facility management database.

Manifests and emergency plans

Summary dangerous goods manifests are included as an appendix to each individual building emergency procedure manual (where relevant) and the University's site emergency management plans.