Skip to main content
Sydney scientists create a buzz about beekeeping across Southeast Asia
Research_

Development agriculture

Reaching beyond the borders

The Sydney Institute of Agriculture is at the heart of international, multidisciplinary collaborations to improve food and nutrition security and agricultural profitability around the globe.

Equitably providing safe and nutritious food for 7 billion people is the imperative challenge facing humanity. Agriculture is the main source of our food, fibre and biofuel, and remains the primary livelihood of most families in the developing world, including many of the world’s poorest. We now recognise that simplistic interventions that expect farmers to adopt new technologies has not always succeeded. In many cases, this is because other constraints in farmer’s lives have not been understood or addressed appropriately. The tremendous technical achievements of the Green Revolution in the twentieth century need to be broadened and translated to address the complex scientific, economic, health, political, infrastructural and educational environments facing people in developing nations.

The Development Agriculture theme brings together researchers with vast experience and diverse expertise from across the Faculties and with other University of Sydney Centres, such as the Charles Perkins Centre, Sydney Southeast Asia Centre, and Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity.

The goal of the Development Agriculture theme is to initiate and facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations by uniting researchers from multiple disciplines with expertise relating to agriculture and food in developing economies. The SIA is a forum designed to nurture and support these collaborations. Our aim is to discover and apply transformative and innovative solutions that drive sustainable and profitable agriculture. Only if agriculture is profitable and sustainable, and developed as an integrated component of raising living standards, will we improve food and nutrition security across the world.

Current research projects include:

  • improving the genetics of cereals and pulse crops
  • developing public-private partnerships in cocoa farming
  • increasing development impact of agricultural research in Africa
  • strengthening food and nutrition security through family poultry and crop integration in Tanzania and Zambia.

2018 highlights of the DFAT Australian Awards Fellows field trip

The field trip was co-organised by the late Prof Odeh.

Professor David Guest

Development agriculture Theme Leader

Optiminising soil management and health in PNG integrated cocoa farming systems

661KB
Download PDF

Beyond Smoke & Fire: A field school on Peatlands in Indonesia

1.8MB
Download PDF

Developing the cocoa value chain in Bougainville

965.9KB
Download PDF

Evaluating smallholder livelihoods and sustainability in Indonesian coffee and cocoa value chains

836.5KB
Download PDF

Tour provides ag knowledge

Sesquicentennial Associate Professor in Rural Spatial Information Systems, Inakwu Odeh, was responsible for building the connection between Africa and Australia through the fellowship program. Odeh sadly passed away early February and his African proteges did not have the privilege of meeting and working with him. The University of Sydney’s Associate Professor Daniel Tan said Odeh was the driving force behind enabling the Australia Awards Fellowship supported by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

What’s that weed in my rice field?

A new smartphone application developed by a University of Sydney Masters student will help the plight of Cambodian farmers to manage the spread of weeds in their rice fields.

Five Minutes with David Guest

This World Chocolate Day, our resident expert, Professor David Guest, talks about the chocolate shortage crisis and why you should follow your passion.