History on Wednesday

Seminar Series for Postgraduates and Faculty

Held at 12.10-1.30
in Woolley Common Room, Woolley Building A22
(Enter Woolley through the entrance on Science Road and climb the stairs in front of you. Turn left down the corridor, and the WCR is the door at the end of the hall)
Click here for map

Coordinators:
Dr Andrés Rodriguez and Professor Kirsten McKenzie

Semester 2 2018

1 August
Deborah Cohen
(Northwestern University)
The Geopolitical is Personal: American Foreign Correspondents, India and the British Empire in the 1930s and 1940s

15 August
Andrew Fitzmaurice
(University of Sydney)
Hobbes, democracy and the Virginia Company

22 August
Charlotte Greenhalgh
(Monash University)
Women and Social Research in Australia, 1940-1970

12 September
Hélène Sirantoine
(University of Sydney)
The Saint and the Saracen: Iberian hagiographical material and Christian perceptions of Islam in the Middle Ages

3 October
Chin Jou
(University of Sydney)
Food and Power in American prisons in the mass-incarceration era.

17 October
Catie Gilchrist
(University of Sydney)
Call the Coroner! Investigating Sudden Death in Colonial Sydney

31 October
Laura Rademaker
(Australian Catholic University)
Found in translation: language and translation in Aboriginal history

Semester 1 2018

7 March
Marco Duranti
(University of Sydney)
French Colonialism and International Human Rights after 1945

21 March
Peter Hobbins
(University of Sydney) and Elizabeth Roberts-Pedersen (University of Newcastle)
False horizon: historical data, the psychology of risk and the politics of safety

18 April
Penny Russell
(University of Sydney)
Family Business: Love and Money in Colonial Sydney

2 May
Paul Betts
(Oxford University)
Red Globalism: Eastern Europe, Decolonization and African Heritage

16 May
Elizabeth Manley
(Xavier University of Louisiana)
Created by God for Tourism: Developing Tropical Paradise in the Dominican Republic, 1966 - 1978

23 May
Chris Hilliard
(University of Sydney)
The Notting Hill Riots and After: “Working-Class Community” in the Racialization of British Politics