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Historic partnership with Consumer Led Research Network

Bringing the voices of consumers into translational research
The University of Sydney's Brain and Mind Centre is proud to have entered into a historic partnership with the Consumer Led Research Network.

On May 15 the Brain and Mind Centre signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Consumer Led Research Network (CLRN) to foster collaboration between the two organisations.

Previously based at the Mental Health Commission of New South Wales, the CLRN was set up to increase consumer participation and leadership in mental health research. The group aims to bring the voices of people with mood disorders to the forefront, to help inform the direction of mental health research and policy development.

 

Professor Ian Hickie (Brain and Mind Centre Co-Director) and Dr Katherine Gill (Chair of the CLRN) at the Memorandum of Understanding signing

Professor Ian Hickie (Brain and Mind Centre Co-Director) and Dr Katherine Gill (Chair of the CLRN)

 

Professor Ian Hickie met with members of the CLRN on Tuesday including Dr Katherine Gill (Chair), Be Aadam, Richard Schweitzer, Tim Heffernan, Mark McMahon as well as NSW Mental Health Commissioner Catherine Lourey.

A Memorandum of Understanding was signed to pledge to work together and collaborate on research projects. As well as increase awareness of the value of translational research that includes the perspective of the people affected.

Brain and Mind Centre and Consumer Led Research Network discussions

Brain and Mind Centre and Consumer Led Research Network discussions 

Great to witness the CLRN and the Brain and Mind Centre sign an MOU to foster and support consumer-led and collaborative research. Taking the focus from being the subject of research to asking the questions research needs to explore. Exciting times ahead! ‏
Catherine Lourey, NSW Mental Health Commissioner (Twitter)
This is such an important development for us. It's critical that consumer-led research is recognised and supported nationally.
Professor Ian Hickie