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Research in marketing

Examining consumer behaviour in a global business environment
The Discipline of Marketing draws upon strong industry engagement, innovative research techniques and expert staff to understand consumers and their decision-making process.

Our research is characterised by strong links with business, professional associations, government and not-for-profit organisations. This has resulted in research grants and consultancy projects that ensure our research is both relevant and of the highest academic standards. We publish our work in top-tier journals, sit on editorial review boards and win research awards.

We embrace a range of research paradigms, including experimental design, quantitative modelling, surveys, and various qualitative interpretive techniques. Areas of expertise include:

  • consumer decision-making and behaviour
  • international marketing
  • consumer culture.

Our people

Meet our academics and research students.

Professor Donnel Briley

Professor Elizabeth Cowley

Professor Shai Danziger

Professor Pennie Frow

Professor Ellen Garbarino

Professor Peter Naude

Associate Professor Marylouise Caldwell

Associate Professor Teresa Davis

Associate Professor Paul Henry

Associate Professor Margaret Jekanyika Matanda

Associate Professor Ranjit Voola

Honorary Professors

Adam Duhachek

Andrew Baxter

Ian Wilkinson

Shivaun Anderberg
Degree: PhD
Working title: Fighting emotion with emotion in financial decision making
Supervisors: Ellen Garbarino, Robert Slonim

Ellese Ferdinands
Degree: PhD
Working title: Instafame: Social media influencers and the transfer of online status into offline spaces
Supervisor: Teresa Davis

Madhumita Nanda
Degree: MPhil
Working title: Role of images in social media on brand post popularity
Supervisor: Steven Lu

Sik Chuen (Max) Yu
Degree: PhD
Working title: Political Ideology and Word-of-Mouth
Supervisors: Donnel BrileyPennie Frow

Research seminars

The Discipline of Marketing seminar organiser is Marylouise Caldwell. To RSVP for any of these seminars contact Vlasta Chiang Soto.

The impact of artificial agents on persuasion: A construal level account
  • Date: 27 April 2018 at 2pm
  • Speaker: Professor Adam Duhachek, Kelley School of Business, Indiana University
Remembering experiences: How and when do we get utility from experiences?
  • Date: 29 March 2018 at 2pm
  • Speaker: Professor Tom Meyvis, Stern School of Business
Decision making and behavioural research symposium
  • Date: 23 February 2018, 9:00am-6:30pm
  • Keynote speaker: Joann Peck
Does choice lie in the eyes of the beholder? Implications of a choice mindset for cognition, emotion, motivation and policy
  • Date: 14 February 2018 at 2pm
  • Speaker: Associate Professor Krishna Savani, Nanyang Technological University
The role of visioning in network strategiding processes
  • Date: 23 November 2017 at 10am
  • Speaker: Professor Peter Naudé, University of Sydney Business School
The loyalty effect of gift purchases
  • Date: 13 October 2017 at 2pm
  • Speaker: Professor Andreas Eggert, University of Paderborn, Germany
Differential impacts of God and religion on prosocial intentions
  • Date: 8 September 2017 at 2pm
  • Speaker: Professor Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Graduate School of Business, Koç University
Gift-giving motivations at social events, affective forecasting and gift amount
  • Date: 18 August 2017 at 3pm
  • Speaker: Professor Shai Danziger, Coller School of Management, Tel Aviv University
The effects of political ideology on consumer creativity
  • Date: 7 April 2017 at 2pm
  • Speaker: Professor Adam Duhachek, Kelley School of Business – Indiana University
Threads of success: New empirical generalisations from a large crowdsourcing dataset
  • Date: 21 February 2017 at 2pm
  • Speaker: Professor Anirban Mukherjee, Lee Kong Chian School of Business, Singapore Management University
It could be otherwise: Jimmy Saville and the situated dynamics of revelation
  • Date: 13 February 2017 at 2pm
  • Speaker: Professor Steve Woolgar, University of Oxford, UK and Linkoping University, Sweden