Skip to main content
Research_

Community academic partnerships

Perfect partnering: effective university-community collaboration

Universities collaborate with others to address community issues such as health, and education. These partnerships are subject to evaluation by the University, but who assesses them from the community’s point of view?

By bringing together researchers from the fields of medicine, health, rural health, education, social work, engineering, agriculture, and environmental studies, we address many areas in which academic–community engagement occur. We also assess the outcomes of these relationships for our partnering organisations, the broader community and for the University.

We evaluate university collaborations from the perspective of the community. We ensure they’re mutually effective, transformative and sustainable.

Our work focuses on social interaction and the relationships that are formed between the University and community. We also examine the learning and professional experiences gained by participating students and the effects on community health, wellbeing, knowledge, capacity, performance, and social and cultural change.

Our unique cross-disciplinary team examines social issues through multiple theoretical frameworks. We provide new insights into how mutually successful partnerships are planned, developed, implemented, and sustained. Our research also informs how universities should engage with communities to create mutually beneficial partnerships in the future.

  • Professor David Lyle, Medicine, University of Sydney [Project lead]
  • Michele DalyMedicine, University of Sydney
  • Melanie Davern
  • Associate Professor Susan Goodwin, Education and Social Work, University of Sydney
  • Debra Jones, Medicine, University of Sydney
  • Dr Susan Kirby, Medicine, University of Sydney
  • Koshila Kumar, Medicine, University of Sydney
  • Dr Mary Lam, Health, University of Sydney
  • Professor Lindy McAllister, Health, University of Sydney

 

Domains

  • Society and environment

Themes

Project lead

Professor David Lyle
Professor David Lyle
Visit David Lyle's profile