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Banking (non Commerce)

Major

Banks play an important role in the economy, attracting savings, granting credit, investing in industries and facilitating business through payment systems. Our banking major takes an applied approach and will allow you to gain in-depth understanding of how banks and financial intermediaries function in the world economy, as well as how they operate internally.

There is significant demand for graduates with specialised undergraduate study in banking, as careers in this area are rapidly evolving with technological and financial innovation.

You will study theory and practice relating to financial services, with an emphasis on practical application techniques.

You will learn the role of banks in the financial system, the management and regulation of banks in domestic and international contexts, and the activities of private and investment banks.

The unique quantitative skills developed through this major will provide you with a head start over other graduates in the financial industry.

By studying at the Business School, you will be joining our Discipline of Finance, a leading research group currently ranked among the top finance groups in the Asia-Pacific region.

Please Note. This is the Table S version of the Banking major available to students who are not enrolled in the Bachelor of Commerce or Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Advanced Studies.

About this major

For the award of a major in Banking for students not enrolled in the Bachelor of Commerce or Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Advanced Studies, a total of 48 credit points in units of study are completed, comprising:
(1) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units of study*:

  • BUSS1020 Quantitative Business Analysis; or ECMT1010 Introduction to Economic Statistics: or ENVX1002 Introduction to Statistical Methods; or six credit points of 1000-level MATH units including one of the following: MATH1005, MATH1015 or MATH1905; and
  • BUSS1040 Economics for Business Decision Making; or ECON1001 Introductory Microeconomics; or ECON1002 Introductory Macroeconomics.

(2) 12 credit points of 2000-level core units of study:

  • BANK2011 Banking and the Financial System, or ECOS2004 Money and Banking**; and
  • FINC2011 Corporate Finance I.

(3) 12 credit points of 3000-level core units of study:

  • BANK3011 Bank Financial Management; and
  • BANK3600 Banking in Practice.

(4) 12 credit points of 3000-level selective units of study:

  • BANK3012 Bank Regulation and Supervision;
  • BANK3013 International Banking;
  • BANK3014 Private and Investment Banking;
  • BANK3015 Contemporary Commercial Banking;
  • CLAW3210 Banking and Finance Law.

* Note. Instead of BUSS1020: Students not enrolled in the Bachelor of Commerce or Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Advanced Studies who select this major from Table S may substitute ECMT1010; ENVX1002; or 6 credit points of MATH units (which must include one of MATH1005, MATH1015, or MATH1905). Instead of BUSS1040: Students not enrolled in the Bachelor of Commerce or Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Advanced Studies who select this major from Table S may substitute ECON1001 or ECON1002.

** Note. Non-Commerce students can complete either BANK2011 or ECOS2004 to meet the core requirement for this major. 

Career Pathways

Completing a Banking major is essential for anyone who wants to pursue a career in the commercial or investment banking, risk management or financial industry regulation. However, studying banking is useful for everyone generally interested in business, because understanding how banks operate and are managed will be useful in any business dealings with them. Our graduates will find themselves in a variety of careers such as:

  • Commercial and investment banking
  • Financial services
  • Consulting
  • Risk management
  • Financial industry regulation
  • Central banking
  • Government departments
Career pathways
Courses that offer this major
Units of study in this major

To commence study in the year

The course information on this website applies only to future students. Current students should refer to faculty handbooks for current or past course information.

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