Skip to main content
Structural engineers win awards
News_

Structural engineers recognised for ongoing contributions

7 August 2017
Celebrating the exceptional work of two structural engineers

Outstanding ongoing contributions to the field of structural engineering have seen two academics from the School of Civil Engineering recognised by their peers with prestigious awards.

Professor Brian Uy, Head of the School of Civil Engineering, was recently awarded the Lewis Kent Award by the Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE) for ongoing dedicated service to its council and the Australia Regional Group.

IStructE is the world's largest membership organisation dedicated to the art and science of structural engineering, with only 37 Fellows within Australasia, including Professor Uy.

Uy became a graduate member of IStructE over 25 years ago and has since risen to become a prominent figure within the New South Wales and Australian regional groups, culminating with his election as Chairman of the Australian Regional Group (ARG) in 2012.

“As a Chartered Structural Engineer, being recognised by the pre-eminent structural engineering institution in the world with one of its highest awards for personal contributions, is indeed a great honour,” said Uy.

In a further accolade for the School of Civil Engineering, Dr Damith Mohotti was presented the Engineering Excellence Award for presenting the best publication within last five years by the Institution of Engineers Australia (NSW Chapter) (IESL NSWC).

Mohotti’s work on ‘Polyurea coated composite aluminium plates subjected to high velocity projectile impact’ covers one of the more demanding areas of engineering research recognised by the Australian Research Council (ARC) and highlights a novel concept of using multilayered material systems in protective structures.

“I am humbled that this paper was selected by my peers and other leading academics within IESL and I hope it attracts greater attention to what is an innovative research area within the University of Sydney,” said Mohotti.

“My research is aimed at keeping people safe and protecting them from natural and human-caused disasters, so I am passionate about developing better design techniques for structures to survive under such extreme loadings.”