student profile: Ms Chiala Hernandez Silva


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Thesis work

Thesis title: Transport of heat and scalar in turbulent boundary layers

Supervisors: John PATTERSON , Kapil CHAUHAN

Thesis abstract:

Thermals occur in every environment and originate when there are strong temperature differences in the lower regions of the atmosphere. Daytime solar radiation is the source of these temperature differences which is absorbed by hot concrete buildings, parking lots and asphalt roads. Due to the significance thermals have in the transport of heat and pollutants in the atmosphere, further research is required. However, the study of heat and scalar transport is challenging as they are governed by non-linear and coupled equations of turbulent flows. The Interaction between turbulent boundary layers and transport of heat and scalar have been widely studied and new developments are constantly emerging. However, the influence of thermals on scalar dispersion has not been systematically investigated. The present research aims to obtain simultaneous velocity and temperature fluctuations in all components (u, v, w) using hot- and cold-wire anemometry and instantaneous concentrations of scalar using a photoionisation detector (PID); these measurements will be performed in the facilities of the Boundary layer wind tunnel (BLWT) at the University of Sydney. The analysis of this experimental data will contribute to the understanding of how plumes of contaminant released from a ground level and elevated location are influenced by a localised source of heat.

Selected publications

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Journals

  • Talluru, K., Hernandez Silva, C., Philip, J., Chauhan, K. (2017). Measurements of scalar released from point sources in a turbulent boundary layer. Measurement Science and Technology, 28(5), 1-13. [More Information]

2017

  • Talluru, K., Hernandez Silva, C., Philip, J., Chauhan, K. (2017). Measurements of scalar released from point sources in a turbulent boundary layer. Measurement Science and Technology, 28(5), 1-13. [More Information]

Note: This profile is for a student at the University of Sydney. Views presented here are not necessarily those of the University.