student profile: Mr Zhichao Huang


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Thesis work

Thesis title: The behaviour and design of concrete-filled very high strength steel tubular columns under axial compression

Supervisors: Brian UY , Chao HOU

Thesis abstract:

In recent decades, steel-concrete composite columns have found increasing popularity in the modern construction practice worldwide. Some research has been conducted on concrete-filled steel tubular (CFST) columns incorporating high strength materials. The columns employing very high strength steel (yield stress of up to 960 MPa) and high strength concrete (compressive strength of up to 100 MPa) provide a higher resisting capacity. Moreover, infilled concrete prevented steel inward buckling while steel confined concrete laterally and longitudinally. Therefore, the columns resist load with a small cross-section area in comparison with conventional structures. The weight of building structures can be saved, and more lettable space can be obtained. However, the research in CFST columns with very high strength steel is very limited. In this research, an experiment programme is proposed to discover a slenderness limit, and buckling and post-buckling behaviour of CFST columns incorporating very high strength steel and high strength concrete under concentric axial compression. Also, a finite element model is developed to simulate the CFST columns in various dimensions. Finally, an analytical analysis is performed to compare the experimental results with some design standards, such as Australia Standards 2327, Eurocode 4 and AISC/ANSI

Selected publications

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Journals

  • Huang, Z., Li, D., Uy, B., Thai, H., Hou, C. (2019). Local and post-local buckling of fabricated high-strength steel and composite columns. Journal of Constructional Steel Research, 154, 235-249. [More Information]

2019

  • Huang, Z., Li, D., Uy, B., Thai, H., Hou, C. (2019). Local and post-local buckling of fabricated high-strength steel and composite columns. Journal of Constructional Steel Research, 154, 235-249. [More Information]

Note: This profile is for a student at the University of Sydney. Views presented here are not necessarily those of the University.