Executive Master of Arts and Social Sciences

Item Errata Date
1.

The following unit is no longer available in 2019:

HRTD6909 The Philosophy of Human Rights

10/12/2018

Executive Master of Arts and Social Sciences

Candidates for the Executive Master of Arts and Social Sciences must complete 96 credit points including: a minimum of 18 credit points of applied module units of study, a minimum of 6 credit points of capstone units of study and a maximum of 72 credit points of elective module units of study.

Applied module units of study

FASS5001 Innovation: Past, Present, Future

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd essay proposal (15%), 1x1000wd presentation (15%), 1x4000wd research essay (60%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit critically considers concepts of innovation, their evolution and benefits. Divided into 3 sections, it examines great innovations in thought and practice in the past and what determined success or failure then turns to the present and the future to explore the frameworks and policies that make innovation possible.
PHIL6251 Ethics and Leadership

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture/week, 1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (45%), 1x2000wd research assignment (45%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A philosophical introduction to ethics. Does morality clash with self-interest? Should we violate someone's rights in order to increase overall happiness? Is respect for autonomy compatible with effective leadership? What are the virtues of a good leader? Should there be moral limits to markets? Should we punish, tolerate, or forgive wrongdoers?
PMGT5872 People and Leadership

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online, Block mode
This is a core program unit with a focus on enhancing leadership and people management capability. It covers diverse traditional and innovative theories, models and tools. It complements traditional views based on PMBoK, applying diverse approaches to contemporary project environments. Many of the unit tasks are framed in uncertain and potentially ambiguous terms as is common in many project environments.
Topic areas covered: Project context; Personal Competence; Interpersonal Competence; Team Competence.
The unit references a range of Australian and global Project Management, Management and Consulting Standards. It integrates theory and practice to optimise results.
GCST5905 Identity Place and Culture

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2000wd seminar paper with annotated bibliography (40%) and 1x3000wd Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit familiarises students with contemporary ideas and debates concerning cultural identity, community and location, with an emphasis on diversity and difference in contemporary Australian culture but placed in an international context by the wider field of cultural studies. It will focus on contemporary case studies to enable students to explore theories of identity, community and cultural location and develop appropriate and effective means of analysing contemporary cultural identities and practices.

Capstone units of study

FASS7003 Group Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr seminar, 1x2hr seminar, 3x0.5hr meetings with academic coordinator Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Assessment: 1x800wd Group presentation (25%), 1x5200wd Group Project Report (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
he group project allows students to apply discipline specific knowledge and professional, strategic and leadership skills to a real-world scenario.
FASS7006 Dissertation 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervised meetings/semester or equivalent Prerequisites: 24 credit points Assessment: 1x12000wd Dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This dissertation comprises research and writing towards a 12000 word dissertation. Candidates must formulate a topic and seek permission for enrolment from the Degree director. Approval is subject to availability of appropriate supervision by an academic staff member. Must be followed by enrolment in FASS7007.
FASS7007 Dissertation 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervised meetings/semester or equivalent Prerequisites: FASS7006 Assessment: 1x12000wd Dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Completion of research and writing of a 12000 word dissertation.
FASS7004 Industry Internship

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr seminar, 1x2hr seminar, 3x0.5 meetings with academic co-ordinator, 90-105 hours industry placement Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Prohibitions: FASS7003 Assessment: 1x700wd Project journal (20%), 1x800wd Short oral presentation (30%), 1x3000wd Internship Report (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The internship is a project-based industry placement of 20 days minimum in an appropriate organisation in Sydney, elsewhere in Australia or overseas. Internships invite critical reflection on concepts learned during the coursework component of their Arts and Social Sciences postgraduate degree. Internships also foster the acquisition of essential knowledge and skills (including strategic skills) and greatly enhance students' employment prospects. Projects are supervised by a professional from the host institution and an academic co-ordinator.

Elective module units of study

ARIN6901 Network Society

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Online activities (20%), 1x1500wd Report and network analysis (25%), 1x1000wd equivalent Responses to readings (20%), 1x500wd Abstract (5%), 1x2000wd Major Essay (30%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Is the network the distinctive mode of organisation for the 21st century? The Internet is the paradigmatic mode of decentralised many-to-many communication that interconnects with the century-old telecommunications and broadcasting networks. Geopolitical networks have displaced left/right Cold War oppositions. Social and professional networks extend influence beyond traditional institutional and family allegiances. Network models have challenged rationalist rule-governed models of thought and practice. The interdisciplinary critical analysis of current research, theory and debates will allow students to understand and evaluate the significance of networks in the contemporary world.
ECMT5001 Principles of Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 500wd (10%), 1xGroup assignment equivalent to 1000wd (15%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (20%), 1x2hr Final exam (55%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit develops the basic principles of data description and analysis, the idea of using the concept of probability to model data generation, and the statistical concepts of estimation and statistical inference, including hypothesis testing. It then develops these concepts and techniques in the context of the linear regression model to show how econometric models can be used to analyse data in a wide range of potential areas of application in economics, business and the social sciences. The unit combines theory and application. The emphasis is upon the interpretation of econometric estimation results and requires software for hands-on experience.
ECON5001 Microeconomic Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON5040 Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 1000wd (10%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (35%), 1x2hr Final exam (55%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presumes no prior exposure to economics and aims, by the end of the unit, to bring a proficiency equivalent to that of students with an intermediate level microeconomics unit in an Honours degree program. Many economic principles developed in this unit are routinely used in several other units in the program. Microeconomics studies how economic agents make choices in a variety of environments. The unit covers theory and applications of the principles of consumer choice, of firm behaviour, and of strategic interaction among economic agents. Equipped with these theories of decision making, students can address a range of interesting and important questions. Examples are: What market strategy should a firm adopt with its competitors? How might one create a market to deal with externalities such as pollution? What are the implications of different kinds of taxes? What compensation scheme will provide the right incentives to work?
ECON5002 Macroeconomic Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON5003 Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 1500wd (20%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presumes no prior exposure to economics and aims, by the end of the unit, to bring a proficiency equivalent to that of students with an intermediate level macroeconomics unit in an Honours degree program. Many economic principles developed in this unit are routinely used in several other units in the program. Macroeconomics studies aggregate economic behaviour. The unit covers theories of the engines of long-run economic growth, of unemployment, of money, inflation, the interest rate and the exchange rate, as well as consumption, saving and investment behaviour. The unit also studies a number of applications of the theory and addresses contemporary macroeconomic problems and policy.
ECOP6101 Core Concepts in Political Economy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 4x4x500wd seminar papers (40%), 1x4000wd essay (45%), seminar participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit explores the core concepts of Political Economy through the lens of the principal schools of economic thought which comprise the social science discipline of economics. The historical origins of each school are identified along with their methodological approaches and analytical tools, policy prescriptions and insights. This examination illuminates the different views about the dynamics of the capitalist economy and lays the foundation for the application of political economic reasoning to a wide range of contemporary issues.
EDPA5011 Organisational Culture and Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr George Odhiambo Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%) and 1x3000wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Institutions throughout most parts of the world are confronted by a period of rapid and dramatic change. The external demands placed upon them to change and improve are considerable. The key elements of leadership, vision and mission and their relationships to the development of a unique organisational culture are essential ingredients for organisational effectiveness, excellence and continuous improvement. This core unit focuses upon the internal and external forces that influence the culture of a variety of organisations and uses the competing theories and alternative approaches to management development.
EDPA6018 Social Policy Process

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Anthony Welch Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: class attendance and participation, including discussion and mini-presentations (15%); presentation (35%) and essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
The world of policy is changing, from a centralised model to a decentralised one, in which you may be involved, at least at institutional level. Whether you work in the public, private, or third sector as an educator, social worker, civil servant or in another capacity, it is important to understand the changing world of policy. Another change that we examine is the rise of neo-liberalism and its effects on the policy process. Critics charge that policy is now framed with economic rather than social good in mind, and that the success of policies is measured by the same calculus. How is policy made, and by whom? How does Australian federalism influence the making and implementation of policy? What kinds of transnational influences affect the policy process, and to what extent? Do different countries respond to difference (class, ethnic, gender, age), in a world of increasing diversity, migration and mobility?
ENGG5812 Project Delivery Approaches

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Seminar, Workshops Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit develops skills in critically evaluating different project management methods and tools in relation to the complex systems environments that they are required to manage. Students will work on project case studies and be given the opportunity to consider different contemporary project delivery approaches and the relationship with both benefits and organisational change management. Lean Six Sigma, PRINCE2, PMBoK, agile methods and others will be examined in addition to hybrid models that blend more than one framework or method. The unit targets the higher analytical capabilities required at Practitioner to Manager levels (Levels 3 to 4) on the Project Management Learning Progression Table, addressing the critical thinking and systems thinking dimensions of Project Methods, Project Development, Project Communication and Project Delivery. The distinguishing quality of thinking at this level is its systematic character, working from a broad-based theoretical and practical understanding of the project delivery environment. The unit will go beyond what the approaches are and critically explore how to select the most suitable delivery method for your project. The aim at this level is not only to formulate reasonable and critical responses to a given problem, but also to articulate thorough and conclusive assessments for the development of tailored project delivery approaches that combine elements from different project delivery systems and methodologies. You need to identify key elements of the project and organise them into a coherent and persuasive argument about the recommended project delivery approach, encompassing consideration of the various risks, benefits, costs and processes involved. The unit builds upon the skills of complex problem analysis developed at a more basic level in Critical and Systems Thinking and together with this unit forms a two-part sequence dealing with the analytical abilities required in determining specific project delivery approaches for complex projects with different characteristics. Students enrolling in this unit are expected to have already developed a basic level of ability in forming and communicating critical judgments regarding complex problem situations through completion of the Critical and Systems Thinking unit or equivalent.
ENGL6102 Approaches to Critical Reading

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd annotated bibliography (20%), 1x1000wd equivalent Oral Presentation (20%), 1x4000wd Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a core unit for the Master of English Studies. This unit will introduce students to a variety of critical approaches to literature. In addition to developing critical and theoretical literacy, the unit aims to develop advanced skills in identifying how and why such strategies might be brought to bear on reading literary texts, and to evaluate how effective and/or appropriate such strategies might be in specific cases. The unit also aims to critically examine theories of the text as a physical and conceptual object.
GOVT6313 Leadership in Theory and Practice

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd leadership research paper (25%), 1x1000wd Leader in Action group proposal (15%), 1x20min Leader in Action group presentation (20%), 1x3500wd reflective journal (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
'The leader points the way.' Eleanor Roosevelt. Leadership is a story that resolves these questions: What is a leader? What kinds of leaders are there? Is democratic leadership different from other kinds? Is leadership in a local community similar to that in national politics or international politics? Are leaders made or born? Is leadership generic? Is it the same in Europe and Asia? What is the difference between a leader and a manager? This unit reviews and evaluates theories of leadership. Participants' experiences and perceptions of leadership are an important part of the unit.
GOVT6316 Policy Making, Power and Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Short Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Long Essay (50%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on the nature of public policy and the processes by which it is produced. Relevant issues are common to all nation states, although they take specific forms in each individual country. First, the unit takes an overview of public policy - dealing with basic themes such as 'What is policy?' through to different approaches to understanding the policy process. These include policy cycles, rationality, interest groups, institutions, and socio-economic interests. Second, it maps out and examines the main components of public policy making: actors, institutions and policy instruments. Third, it focuses on aspects of policy-making processes which often attract a high level of attention from analysts. These include problem definition, agenda setting, decision-taking, policy implementation, policy evaluation and crisis policy-making. Fourth, it examines wider issues in terms of the state and who ultimately holds power over the making and shaping of public policy. Finally, it examines the 'bigger pictures' of long term policy trends, and the extent to which national policy making capacities and processes have been affected by globalisation. Assessments offer a large element of flexibility, allowing students to concentrate on areas of particular interest.
LNGS7006 Cross-Cultural Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Linguistic Relativity (20%), 1x2000wd Mid-semester exam (30%), 1x3000wd Final paper (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In today's globalised and multicultural societies, cross-cultural communication is common enough. Even so, it continues to be a challenge, both for people who engage in cross-cultural communication on a daily basis, and for researchers trying to describe and understand it. In this unit of study we will consider a variety of discourse-analytic approaches to studying cross-cultural communication, including conversation analysis, speech act theory, interactional sociolinguistics, the ethnography of communication, and critical discourse analysis. In our analyses of actual samples of cross-cultural communication we will pay particular attention to the social positioning of participants in an interaction, and the ways how social relationships (particularly of power and intimacy) between participants are reflected in their linguistic practices. The unit will end with exploring applied perspectives, particularly on cross-cultural communication in educational, courtroom and workplace interactions.
MECO6927 Organisational Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x1250wd in-class essay (40%), 1x3000wd group research project (50%), 1x500wd discussion facilitation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces key concepts in organisational communication. Students will explore various structures of organisations and how those structures affect the flow of communication within workplaces. Upon the completion of the unit, students will develop their understanding of key concepts in organisational communication and apply them to analyse communication problems in organisations. Students will also be able to offer well-grounded criticism on selected organisational issues.
PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: WORK6026 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Welcome to PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change. This course is designed to foster and promote critical thinking and the application of good theory to inform good practice in the strategic delivery of organisational change. The philosophy underpinning this course is design thinking and storytelling. You will learn quite a bit about these ideas over the duration of the course, and why it is increasingly important to change management. The course develops capabilities that will differentiate you from the average project manager and change agent, and which are in high demand in forward thinking organisations: be they in private, public or third sector.
PMGT5891 Project Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit is delivered in multiple modes (online and weekly). Please ensure that the correct mode is selected before checking the detailed content. The aims of this course are to develop students' understanding and ability in applying project risk management skills in project environments. The course enables the students to apply best practice techniques and methods commonly used by industry in project risk management. The competencies developed through this unit cover and go beyond the competencies in Risk areas as outlined in the competency standards by the Australian Institute of Project Management and Project Management Institute in the USA, respectively. The unit aims to develop students ability to understand and conceptualise risk management issues, and analyse and apply risk management techniques using concepts and frameworks from the underpinning literature. - Ability to establish risk management plans, policies and integrate them with other project plans, organisation and align them to the business case - Ability to understand the sources of potential risks (including but not limited to political, organisational, psychological and technical risks) and to use risk management tools and techniques to identify, assess, evaluate, and prioritise risks - Ability to simulate the potential effects of risks on schedule, cost and other performance dimensions using sensitivity analysis, decision tree analysis and simulation techniques. - Ability to track, monitor and control risks and actions to achieve project objectives and the business case - Ability to close risks for an optimal outcome
PMGT6872 Project Leadership and Communications

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: PMGT5872 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Effective leadership skills rate among the greatest contributors of project success. In all but the simplest of projects, project managers must demonstrate leadership effectiveness across each phase of the project life cycle. This course considers various leadership theories and styles, and how they apply to real world projects across industries. In addition, assignments and participative activities will help current and future project managers enhance their own leadership and communication skills, by leading themselves, their teams and their organisations more effectively.
These concepts are underpinned by thought leadership in diverse topics including motivational psychology, social networks and influence, systems thinking, emotional intelligence, ethics, conflict resolution, negotiation, stress management, performance coaching and leading innovation.
SCLG6903 New Debates in Social Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2400wd Research essay (40%), 1x2400wd Research essay (40%), 1x1200wd equivalent online presentations and discussion (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores a series of issues of controversy and debate in social theory. These include debates over: the information age; new information and communication technologies; the new capitalism and changing work practices; the cultural sphere; new forms of power and surveillance; shifting claims to insight in knowledge societies; the role of education in social inequality; the bases of making knowledge claims; and globalisation. The unit involves both face-to-face seminars and online discussions.
WRIT6000 Professional Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Analysis (20%), 1x2000wd Case Study (30%), 1x1000wd Project (20%), 1x2000wd Proposal (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces theories of professional writing with a specific focus on composing in the workplace. Students will develop abilities in analysing, writing, revising, and delivering workplace texts, both print and multimedia. By examining and discussing a range of actual workplace documents, from emails to websites, students will gain a broader understanding of the rhetorical principles and ethical responsibilities inherent in professional writing practice. They will improve their ability to negotiate the relationships, tensions, and politics that influence workplace writing contexts.
WRIT6001 Professional Editing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Individual Analysis (30%), 1x2000wd Group Analysis (30%), 1x1000wd Oral Presentation (20%), 1x1000wd Essay (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces practical techniques for editing workplace documents for increased clarity and effectiveness. Applying theories and principles of visual rhetoric, students will learn how to improve the readability and reception of workplace texts according to audience conventions and expectations. By analysing actual workplace documents, students will develop their critical reading abilities and gain a better understanding of how to edit texts for word economy, improved design and layout, and inclusive language. Editing print texts for digital or oral presentation will also be emphasised.
ANHS6901 Ancient Rome: Space and Power

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathryn Welch Session: Intensive January Classes: 25 day residential school in Rome Assessment: 1x2500 word paper (50%), 3x short site studies (900 words equivalent) (20%), 3x short book reviews (900 words equivalent) (20%) and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: May be taken concurrently with ANHS6902.
Throughout the Republic and Empire the public spaces of Rome were political capital. First triumphant generals, then emperors used them for advertisement, persuasion and coercion of a heterogeneous and massive population. This course explores the politics of space in Classical Rome, how different individuals interpreted the needs of their times in different ways and how they responded to the city populations at different times. Can the history of the built environment show us new aspects of an individual's principate and relationship to the population of Rome? Particular (but not exclusive) attention will be paid to topographical and architectural developments in the time of Caesar's dictatorship, Augustus, Domitian, Trajan, Hadrian and Constantine.
ARHT5902 Art Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4000wd research essay (60%), 1x2000wd seminar paper (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Australian Art writing/criticism: theories and methods. The unit explores the varieties of art writing, particularly those which engage with the ongoing production of art and its institutions. This will be pursued through:
(i) a study of the practice of individual critics of modern art;
(ii) examination of the work of recent and current art writers, particularly in Australia;
(iii) direct practice in a number of different writing genres. The results of (i) and (ii) will be presented in the form of both class papers and essays; (iii) will take the form of writing exercises with stipulated frameworks.
ARHT5908 The Business of Art

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd case study report (20%), 1x4000wd research essay (60%), 1xseminar presentation (500wd equivalent)(20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the history and current practices of the business of art through site visits, case studies and lectures. The unit includes the study of established and emerging art markets, auction houses, concepts of authenticity, aesthetic and monetary value, collecting and exhibiting art for private, corporate public and satellite art collections, artist run and alternative spaces, corporate sponsorship and grants, art museums and tourism, and the principles of law and ethics.
ARHT6914 Art and Curatorship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd seminar paper (40%), 1x3500wd research or exhibition project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to object-based skills and issues in the history of art. It considers issues and problems related to connoisseurship, conservation, display and interpretation in the context of museums and art galleries. The unit also provides an introduction to the materials and techniques of art production. Much of the material is presented on-site by curators of the Art Gallery of NSW.
ARHT6920 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Consultation with supervisor as arranged Assessment: Research and writing towards a dissertation of 12000 words (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must also enrol in ARHT6921 the following semester.
Master degree candidates only may undertake research and writing on an approved topic towards a dissertation of 12000 words under the supervision of an academic staff member. The topic is elective. Art Curatorship students have the option of writing a thesis in the form of an exhibition plan and catalogue Essay. The dissertation is equivalent to two units of study. Students enrol in ARHT6920 Dissertation 1 in their first semester of research and complete by enrolling in ARHT6921 Dissertation 2 in the following semester.
ARHT6921 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Consultation with supervisor as arranged Prerequisites: ARHT6920 Assessment: Completion and submission of a dissertation of 12000 words (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Master degree candidates only may undertake research and writing on an approved topic towards a dissertation of 12000 words under the supervision of an academic staff member. The topic is elective. Art Curatorship students have the option of writing a thesis in the form of an exhibition plan and catalogue Essay. The dissertation is equivalent to two units of study. Students enrol in ARHT6920 Dissertation 1 in their first semester of research and complete by enrolling in ARHT6921 Dissertation 2 in the following semester.
ARHT6930 Film Theory: Art, Industry, Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x2000wd Essays (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The relation of film to industrial modernity is an ongoing issue for film theorists. With the advent of digital image processes and production the relation of art and industry has re-emerged with a new set of problems. How do we conceptualise the new forms? What theoretical and aesthetic language(s) do we draw on? And how best to rethink film in the face of rapid technological, formal and cultural change? These issues will be investigated via an examination of the history of film theory's attempts to formulate concepts adequate to the age of industrial modernity.
ARHT6935 The Art Museum: Past, Present and Future

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3500wd essay (50%), 1x2000wd seminar paper (40%), 1xseminar presentation (500wd equivalent) (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores the art museum from its origins in Renaissance and Baroque princely and aristocratic collections, through to the creation of new public spaces and institutions for exhibiting art in the 18th and 19th centuries, including national Academies and international exhibitions. Shifting conceptions of the role of the art museum will be addressed: from public instruction to nation building and mass entertainment. The final section explores current debates, including those posed by an expanding range of new media and changing audience perceptions.
ARIN6902 Internet Cultures and Governance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd journalism piece (40%), 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1x1000wd tutorial exercise (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The internet plays an increasingly important role in all aspects of social, cultural and economic life. This unit of study explores cultures and governance of the online world and investigates how politics manifest not only in public debates and policy, but also in the struggle to develop new information architectures and digital ecosystems.
ARIN6912 Digital Research and Publishing

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 250wd Research Abstract (5%), 2x500wd Referee's Reports (20%), 1750wd Draft Article (5%), 2500wd Journal Article (40%), 500wd Presentation and report (20%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces desktop and Internet skills for conducting research, managing peer review and publishing an online journal. It also addresses the wider social and epistemological transformations in cultural practices of knowledge generation, management and consumption associated with new technologies. It offers essential skills for all students interested in contemporary research and a reflexive view of the historical and cultural contexts of networked digital research technologies.
ASNS6900 Contemporary Asian Societies

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 3xEssays (equivalent to 5000wds total) (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a compulsory core unit for the Master of Asian Studies. The unit will explore some of the most challenging and sensitive issues confronting Asian societies today while providing training in the conceptual methods used to critically and objectively examine those issues. Where do globalization and rapid economic change leave human rights, minority groups, women, civil society, environment, the poor and the ideals of religious and cultural integrity? Case studies will be used to illustrate concepts, theories and critical methods that can help our thinking on such issues.
ASNS6905 Asian Popular Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wds + 500wd equivalent oral component (30%), 1x500wd equivalent oral component (10%), 1x500wd online discussions (10%), 1x3500wd major essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Asia is fast becoming the centre of new developments in the mass media. Focusing on East and Southeast Asia, this unit will introduce major regional trends in film and television, differences in media systems, and cross-cultural understandings of Asian media. Particular focus will be on the analysis of feature films and television from Japan, Korea, Indonesia, Thailand and/or China, and on pan-Asian developments. These analyses will include discussions of the social, cultural and political roles of media.
ASNS6906 Communicating in Asian Contexts

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd group work presentation (15%), 1x2000wd report on presentation (30%), 1x2500wd essay (45%), online and class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit takes a cross-cultural approach to analysing the interactions of speakers of Asian languages and other language backgrounds, both Asian and non-Asian. Theoretical approaches are introduced through case studies, focusing on cultural key words, language systems and interaction styles. Students will reflect on their own cultures, languages and interaction styles, and undertake cross-cultural research, using primary and secondary sources. This is not a language unit; no knowledge of Asian languages is assumed.
ASNS6908 Media Industries in East Asia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1xpresentation (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 1x1500wd industry report (30%), 1x2500wd major Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the development and challenges of media industries in East Asia; Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong SAR, and China. It takes a broad comparative approach to identify political, economic, social, cultural and technological factors that affect the industries in this dynamic region. The unit covers various aspects of old and new media in the region, such as development and transformation of media industries, state regulation and policy, and the implications of the emergence of new communications technologies.
BETH5203 Ethics and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBC Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5x7hour intensives; or Distance Education (online). Prohibitions: BETH5206 Assessment: 5xOnline Quiz (50%); 1x2500wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit provides students with an overview of the ethical and political issues that underlie public health and public health research. The unit begins with some fundamentals: the nature of ethics, of public health (and how it might be different to clinical medicine) and of public health ethics. It introduces key concepts in public health ethics including liberty, utility, justice, solidarity and reciprocity, and introduces students to different ways of reasoning about the ethics of public health. A range of practical public health problems and issues will be considered, including ethical dimensions of communicable and non-communicable diseases in populations, and the ethical challenges of public health research. Throughout, the emphasis is on learning to make sound arguments about the ethical aspects of public health policy, practice and research. Most learning occurs in the context of five teaching intensives, which are highly interactive and focus on the development and application of reasoning skills.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format).
CAEL5045 Web Environment for Cultural Producers

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: project documentation (10%) and seminar presenation (20%) and major project (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective unit of study provides you with the skills and knowledge to conceptualise and develop interactive websites for delivery across a range of platforms including desktop, tablet and mobile. Over the course of the unit of study you will learn a range of approaches to interactive authoring for the web, including principles of user-interface design and navigational architecture for web-based work. You will learn current web authoring tools such as Adobe Dreamweaver and Muse, and be introduced to the possibilities of scripting for design and interactivity using HTML5, CSS and JavaScript libraries. The major outcome of this unit of study is the development of an interactive website that demonstrates the technical and conceptual knowledge you have gained during the unit. It is expected that this project be creatively focused and critically engaged with the possibilities presented by the online environment for media implementation and interactivity. This project is to be supported by a series of seminars and a set of professional standard production documents that reflect the development and implementation of your major project.
CISS6001 New Security Challenges

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (30%), 1x3500wd Essay (60%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit considers the evolving nature of security in the context of global politics. It focuses on non-military challenges to security while acknowledging the relationships between these and traditional security concerns. Among the topics considered are: international law and security; the privatisation of security; economics and security; energy resources; environmental degradation; the burden of infectious diseases; population dynamics; gender and age perspectives on security; the dilemmas of fragile and failing states; transnational organised crime; and new modes of warfare. The overall objective of the unit is to engage with issues and arguments that challenge how security is traditionally understood. Teaching and learning take place via a combination of lectures, student-led seminars, independent research, debates and case studies.
CISS6002 Strategy and Security in the Asia-Pacific

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 2x 2000wd Essay (80%), 1x400wd equivalent Oral Presentation (10%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit focuses on the strategic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region and the security challenges it faces. It combines a grounding in International Relations theory, and concepts of strategy and security, with a series of dedicated country profiles. Issues such as great power rivalry, nuclear proliferation, terrorism, piracy, and environmental degradation are all considered. The overall objective of the unit is to engage with issues and arguments about strategy and security that relate specifically to the Asia-Pacific region. Teaching and learning take place via a combination of lectures, student-led seminars, and independent research.
CISS6004 Health and Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Issue brief (35%), 1x3000wd Research essay (50%), 1x500wd Self-evaluation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit assesses the political and security significance of disease-related events and developments. Whether one contemplates historical experiences with smallpox, the contemporary challenges posed by diseases such as HIV/AIDS and SARS, or the risks arising from new scientific developments such as synthetic biology, it is clear that diseases exercise a powerful influence over civilised humankind. The unit concentrates on areas in which human health and security concerns intersect most closely, including: biological weapons; fast-moving disease outbreaks of natural origin; safety and security in microbiology laboratories; and the relationships between infectious disease patterns, public health capacity, state functioning and violent conflict. The overall aim of the unit is to provide students with a stronger understanding of the scientific and political nature of these problems, why and how they might threaten security, and the conceptual and empirical connections between them.
CISS6006 Statebuilding and 'Fragile States'

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd intelligence briefing paper (40%), Seminar participation (10%), 1x500wd actor profile (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit critically examines the notion of state fragility within the global system. It investigates the characteristics of so-called 'fragile' and 'failed' states, and the nature of international engagement with (and discourses about) these states. It explores various perspectives on state formation in both Western and post-colonial contexts, and emphasises the ways in which knowledge is produced about non-Western states. The unit expands upon the theoretical literature with evidence from case studies in Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia.
CISS6012 Civil-Military Relations

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 5000wd essay (60%) and 1000wd equivalent seminar presentation (30%) and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students must not undertake this unit if they took CISS6011 (Special Topic in International Security) when the special topic was Civil-Military Relations
This unit assesses the nature and effectiveness of civil-military cooperation and coordination in preparing for, responding to, and averting the impact of natural disasters (such as the 2004 tsunami) and conflict, particularly in Australia's nearer region. The new realities of intra-state conflict and support to fragile states have seen Australia commit increased resources to enhance prospects for stability and reduce population displacement, while promoting economic development and achievement of the Millennium Development Goals to reduce poverty. Students in this unit will examine the nexus between state-centric and human security, as well as the difficulties for military forces and humanitarian actors in navigating the 'space' in which they are co-located. Policies, principles and practices of the Australian Government, the United Nations, and other key international actors and non-government organisations are considered. Attention is also given to disaster risk reduction and peace-building strategies to help minimise the severity of natural disasters and the reversion of fragile states into conflict. Focus is given to the problems and severity of population displacement, and to the civil-military requirements to implement population protection, particularly under the Responsibility to Protect framework. The overall aim of the unit is for students to gain a better understanding of the boundaries and complexities of civil-military relations in disaster and conflict situations, and to consider initiatives relevant to Australia.
CISS6013 Middle East Conflict and Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Prohibitions: GOVT6154 Assessment: 1x2500wd briefing paper (45%), 1x2500wd essay (45%), seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit examines the drivers of conflict and insecurity in the contemporary Middle East, starting with a theoretical framework that investigates the processes of state-formation and external intervention in the region. The unit focuses on the interplay between domestic factors (such as rentierism and regime dynamics) and international factors (including geopolitics/geo-economics, and the military industrial complex), and uses several detailed case studies to explore the relationship from various angles.
CISS6015 Alliances and Coalition Warfare

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr Lecture/week, 1x1 hr seminar/week Assessment: 3000wd Essay (80%) and Oral Presentation (10%) and Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Alliances and coalitions are pivotal features of International Security. This unit interrogates these closely-related phenomena using a combination of conceptual frameworks to analyse them, and empirical case studies to illustrate them. The unit starts with an investigation in the thorny definitional issues that surround the distinctions between 'alliance' and 'coalition', then outlines the major conceptual theoretical works pertinent to examining these phenomena, such as 'balance of power', 'intra-alliance politics', and 'multinational operations'. Equipped with these analytical tools the students will apply these concepts to a series of major cases studies of alliance management and coalition warfare operations. Case studies include World War I and II, The Cold War (NATO/Warsaw Pact), The Gulf War (1991), the Balkan Wars (Bosnia 1992-5, Kosovo 1999) and the current 'global war on terror' (i.e. operations in Iraq and Afghanistan). Through this process students will gain both a conceptual and practical understanding of peacetime alliance behaviour and the principles of conducting military operations alongside allies. Student presentations will include an emphasis upon Australia's role as an alliance/coalition partner in historical and contemporary conflicts.
CISS6016 Chinese Foreign and Security Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 4500wd research paper (60%) and 1000wd book report (20%) and 500wd equivalent Class presentation (10%) and Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
China's rise to regional and global prominence has attracted growing attention in recent years. Scholars as well as policymakers debate and assess the implications of rising Chinese power for regional security and the international system. This seminar introduces students to Chinese foreign and security policy, including its handling of major-power relations, its active pursuit of multilateral diplomacy in regional organizations and participation in international peacekeeping operations, and its changing perspectives on arms control, disarmament, and non-proliferation. It begins with a brief history of phases in Chinese foreign and security policy and then gives an overview of major theoretical approaches to the subject. These theoretical perspectives are useful in examining a wide range of policy issues, ranging from Chinese strategic modernization, security trends in the Taiwan Strait, civil-military relations, the Chinese foreign policy process, and the domestic sources of Chinese foreign and security policy. The unit is taught as a seminar, with students expected to write a book review, a research design and bibliography, and a final research paper. Students will be required to do assigned reading, participate actively in class discussions, make Oral Presentations of their book review and research paper, and serve as a discussant for one of their classmates' papers.
CISS6019 War and Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x 2500wd Essay (80%), 1xOral Presentation equivalent to 1000wds (10%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to supply students with an introduction to military affairs and the conduct of war. It considers the complex relationship between politics and strategy and examines strategic thought, the application of land/air/space/naval power and military technologies. It applies this knowledge to interactive case studies before proceeding to investigate more contemporary strategic problems such as the 'revolution in military affairs', 'new' wars, and counter-terrorism and counter-insurgency.
DVST6901 Development: Civil Society and Wellbeing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SSCP6900 Assessment: Weekly online exercises 1000wd in total (15%),1x500wd Research essay proposal (10%), 1x3000wd Research essay (45%), 1x1500wd Take-home exercise (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
The post-1949 era of 'development' has seen a philosophical and policy shift from nation-building projects of 'modernisation' to the local responsiveness of market forces and civil society. An anthropological emphasis on cultural and local difference and a sociological understanding of state and civil society provide a critical perspective on both this history and current debates. Case studies raise questions of health, gender and childhood, project success or failure, and of the hopes and skepticism development evokes.
DVST6904 Rethinking Poverty

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (35%), 1x1hr Exam (15%), 1x1000wd Reading notes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
Poverty reduction has always been a central development goal. Major international programs such as the UN's Millennium Goals place poverty at their centre. New explanatory concepts such as social exclusion, capability, social capital and sustainability have considerably expanded our thinking about its nature. Students will examine cases from many parts of the world of the way discourses, policies and development practices operate together, enabling an evaluation of contemporary approaches to poverty and their effects on those most vulnerable.
ECOP6016 China in the World Economy

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Winter Main Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (30%), 1xTeam Oral Presentation (10%), 1x1500wd report (20%), 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study analyses the modern economic development of the People's Republic of China (PRC) and its role in the international economic system, including the World Trade Organisation. It examines the internal political economy of the PRC; the political economy of transition; and China's transformation into a major centre of foreign direct investment and global exports. In the unit, students will learn the differential impact of China's transformation on the USA, East Asia and Japan, and the European Union. The policy of free trade agreements of China will also be studied. An understanding of these issues is important for people concerned both with investment and trade with China and the global political economic implications of China's emerging market economy under socialism.
ECOP6018 Economic Development: Growth and Wellbeing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ECOP6108 Economic Management for Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x10min seminar presentation (10%), 1x1000wd seminar paper 1 (20%), 1x1000wd seminar paper 2 (20%), 1x3000wd research essay (40%), participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to environmental economic theory, ecological economics, and other critical perspectives in order to develop an understanding of the parameters that define management of economy-environment interactions. Students will develop a critical appreciation of the systemic nature of the pressures imposed on environmental/ecological systems and the intractable problems this presents. The unit examines the different tendencies that inform environmental management and sustainable development; and the relative merits/weaknesses of the strategies and policies advanced.
ECOP6130 Human Rights and International Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SCLG6912 Assessment: 1x1000wd Essay (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1.5hr exam (30%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
This unit links debates over social rights and democratic legitimacy to structural economic arguments. It introduces the competing arguments over social rights and the struggles that have created them, and promotes the use of evidence in these conceptual arguments. The approach of economic liberalism to rights is examined. Important global issues involving rights and economic argument - such as self-determination, land rights, food security, fair trade and economic governance - are examined.
ECOP6901 Finance and Economic Change

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (30%), 1x2500wd Essay (30%), 1x1000wd Presentation (30%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Foreign exchange, security and other derivative markets have expanded dramatically over the past 20 years. More recently, they have been associated with the largest economic crisis in 80 years. This unit develops a political economy perspective on these markets, including their vulnerability to crisis, and the intrusion of financial calculation into wider social and personal calculation. The unit also addresses the regulation of financial markets and institutions, including key regulatory and monitoring agencies, and arguments for new regulatory regimes.
EDPB5002 Globalisation and Education

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Nigel Bagnall Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: on-line Assessment: 500wd minor overview (10%) and 1200wd review essay (20%) and 1500wd minor essay (20%) and 2500wd case study (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Concepts of global integration and culture. Economic political and cultural dimensions of globalisation. Major interpretive approaches to globalisation. Major world trends in education assessed in light of globalisation. Globalisation of labour markets; marked forces in education; cross-cultural and trans-national trends in education provision; knowledge as a global construct; global organisations and agenda in education; emerging global and regional structures in education, students, educational professionals and knowledge workers in a globalising world. Investigation and report on a special study.
EDPB6013 Internationalisation of Education

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Anthony Welch Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: on-line Assessment: 500wd minor overview (10%) and 1200wd review essay (20%) and 1500wd minor essay (20%) and 2500wd case study (50%). Mode of delivery: Online
An investigation of major developments in internationalisation of education, at schooling, technical and further education, and higher education levels. Historical developments of internationalisation; contrasting interpretations and 20th century developments. Contemporary trend analysis including a detailed case study of a specific policy or program.
EDPC5024 Systems, Change and Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Lina Markauskaite Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 2x1500wd short assignments (2x25%) and 1x3000wd group project and presentation (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In this core unit we will use 'systems inquiry' as a conceptual framework to explore change and learning processes, on the individual, group and organisational level. We focus on a theory-based approach to change management and organisational learning, so that students can come to appreciate the complexity and non-linearity of bringing about change in schools, corporations and other organisations. Drawing on contemporary research in the learning sciences, we will explore group and individual learning and conceptual change processes. Students will apply modern conceptual change approaches to investigate their own learning process, and will gain hands-on experience as they apply systems inquiry concepts and methods to analyse change problems in their own professional environment.
EDPE5002 Human Development in Context

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Minkang Kim Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x seminar presentation (30%) and 2000wd review paper (30%) and 1x2500wd research project proposal (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A core unit of study that critically examines theories from developmental sciences in the light of contemporary theory and research, drawing especially on insights provided by Dynamic Systems Theory and neurobiology of the brain development. The aim is to understand the complexity of cognitive, emotional, social, moral and languate development as children engage with the multiplicities of their experience of being in the world. Seminars also focus on how to design and conduct developmental research, and how to read research findings with critical minds.
EDPE5011 Motivation for Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Paul Ginns Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x15min group presentation (25%), 1x2hr in-class written task (35%), 1x2500wd annotated lesson plan (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The major focus of this core unit centres on recent psychological study of motivational processes in the learner and on ways in which learning environments may be seen to foster student motivation for learning and thereby facilitate the attainment of desired learning objectives. The unit will consider the balance between intrinsic and extrinsic sources of motivation, teacher expectations and learner motivation, self-concept and self-system processes in learning and issues of success and failure and anxiety in learning settings. Emphasis will be placed on goal setting and feedback in establishing a facilitative learning environment, student interaction in cooperative learning and the development of motivational components of self-regulation in the learner.
EDPE6013 Learning and Teaching Thinking Skills

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Annishka Oksa Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd seminar paper (30%) and 1xseminar presentation (20%) and 1x3000wd final paper (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This core unit of study centres on examination and evaluation of a number of approaches to the development of higher order cognitive skills. Consideration will be given to the structuring of knowledge to facilitate explanation, problem-solving and creativity and to the use of internalised self-regulatory control strategies in fostering cognitive outcomes. Ways in which thinking and cognition can be supported and extended in educational contexts will be examined in some detail. Particular attention will be given to factors that influence thinking, the role of tools and technologies in facilitating thinking, and perspectives on thinking and cognition generated by contemporary research in cognitive science.
EDPE6016 Adult Learning and Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Paul Ginns Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd learning-contract based essay and reflection exercise (40%) and 1x3000wd seminar essay (40%) and 1x45 minute seminar presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines selected issues relating to adult development and adult learning. Concepts of growth and decline are explored, particularly in relation to cognitive development, transitions in the workplace, within families, and in other social contexts. Considerations of adult learning focus on adult conceptions of learning, higher education, and the development of expertise. It considers contexts for adult learning, and concepts of self-directed and self-regulated learning.
ENGL6107 Sentiment and Sensation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x5000wd Essay (75%), 1x1000wd Class presentation and write-up (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will focus on the narrative and rhetorical strategies used to depict and engage emotion. It will examine the ways in which feeling is both conceptualised and motivated in literary texts, and relate developments in the fictional understanding of emotion to those in philosophy and the natural sciences. It will ask whether emotion can be historicised; how affective responses are engaged in the service of ethical agendas; to what extent do the feelings produced by fiction elude narrative control.
ENGL6108 Modern Australian Poetry and Poetics

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Oral Presentation plus summary (30%),1x4500wd Research essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Critical discussion of Australian poetry has long been preoccupied by the status of its modernism, as a function of wider questions regarding the meaning of Australian modernity. Was modernism only belatedly taken up in the 1970s, or were certain older Australian poets modernist avant la lettre? In this unit students will evaluate a selection of key poems and statements about poetry by Australian writers from 1900 to the present, taking in themes such as: Romantic absence and negativity, the Symbolist inheritance, high and vernacular modernisms, avant gardism and reaction, the Generation of 68, and the fate of postmodernism.
ENGL6109 Modern and Contemporary Drama

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd annotated bibliography (20%), 1x1000wd seminar presentation (20%), 1x4000wd critical essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course develops a critical evaluation of modern drama from its roots in the nineteenth century and its legacy in a selection of contemporary play texts. The course situates developments in dramatic theory and practice alongside dominant social and intellectual trends of the past century (political tyranny/liberation, class structure, women's emancipation, censorship, technological change, the rise of global capital). Students will critically evaluate dramatic texts and performance using a variety of theoretical frameworks.
ENGL6115 Reading Suburbia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd written assignment (30%), 1x500wd Research essay proposal (10%),1x3500wd Research essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Suburbia is a bad object in Australian literature. Neither city nor bush, suburbs can seem culturally bland zones of consumerist domesticity from which artists and writers want to escape. Yet loathing of suburbia can be mixed with desire. This unit explores various topographies of suburbia in fiction, poetry, non-fiction and film. Why do writers return to suburbia? How do suburbs give shape to settler modernity, or stimulate literary modernism? Is the suburb a national or transnational scene in Australian writing?
ENGL6929 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervised meetings/semester or equivalent Prohibitions: ENGL6935 Assessment: Research and writing towards a 12000 word dissertation (100%) to be completed in ENGL6930 Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is a capstone unit in the Master of English Studies program. It comprises research and writing towards a 12000 word dissertation. Candidates must formulate a topic and seek permission for enrolment from the Postgraduate Coordinator. Approval is subject to availability of appropriate supervision by an academic staff member. Must be followed by enrolment in ENGL6930.
ENGL6930 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervised meetings/semester or equivalent Prerequisites: ENGL6929 Prohibitions: ENGL6935 Assessment: Completion and submission of a 12000 word dissertation (100%) following on from ENGL6929 Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is a capstone unit in the Master of English Studies. It comprises completion and submission of a 12000 word dissertation. Candidates must formulate a topic and seek permission for enrolment in the preceding unit, ENGL6929, from the Postgraduate Coordinator. Approval is subject to availability of appropriate supervision by an academic staff member.
ENGL6937 Literary Movements

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd seminar presentation (25%), 1x1500wd proposal for final essay (25%), 1x3000wd final essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to literary movements as a way of thinking about literary texts and their reception in terms of processes broader than any individual author or work. Claims to movement status are inherently polemical. They can emerge from within a community in the form of manifestos and collaborative publications or describe more diffuse networks and alliances. Through case studies we will consider what is at stake in the designation and commodification of literary movements and what benefits or problems flow from such claims.
ENGL6985 Shakespeare and his Contemporaries

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4000wd essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit explores important works by Shakespeare and his contemporaries in the contexts of late-sixteenth- and early-seventeenth-century England. The unit will analyse the texts and authors in relation to one another to uncover key discourses of the period relating to politics, humanism, drama, poetry, gender and genre. Students will gain valuable insights into the literary and cultural richness of the period and come to a deeper understanding of Shakespeare's relevance and significance in his day.
ENGL6991 Aust Lit and the Canonical Imaginary

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x6000wd Essay based on critical analysis of selected texts (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines a selection of Australian works that have - or have not - achieved the status of 'classics'. It will explore both theoretically and historically the processes of literary canon formation and the economy of literary prestige, developing techniques of close reading while also attending to the wider social contexts of reception and reputation-making both nationally and internationally.
FASS7001 Academic English for Postgraduates

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (35%), 1x500wd Annotated Bibliography (15%), 1x2500wd Reflection Journal (25%), 1xSeminar Presentation (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective is designed for International postgraduates who are new to study in an English language university. It supports the development of study, research, and critical thinking abilities, spoken English and academic language. Knowledge acquired in this unit will strengthen written and spoken English to help meet the standards necessary for successful completion of FASS Masters by coursework degrees. It is recommended that this elective be taken during the first semester.
FASS7002 Critical Thinking and Persuasive Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weeks 1-3: 2x1hr lecture/week, 2x2hr tutorial/week; Weeks 4-9:1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd critical review (20%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), seminar presentation (20%),1x2500wd reflection journal (20%), tutorial participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective supports development of skills in critical analysis, writing in different genres, research, presentation, and developing individual scholarly 'voice'. While valuable for all commencing postgraduates, it is of particular benefit to those returning to academia after an extended break, or for International students wishing to orient themselves to local standards of practice for academic communication. This unit is structured to have additional seminars and lectures early in the semester and fewer later in the semester so students have the opportunity to apply new skills to all their coursework. The unit is ideally taken in the first semester of study.
GOVT6108 Democracy, Development and Rights in SE Asia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Oral Presentation and written assessment (30%), 2500wd analytical Essay/report (30%), 1500wd exam (30%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Southeast Asia's economic experiences and socio-political challenges will be examined within an historical and comparative context in order to better appreciate the economic continuities, understand the major socio-political dilemmas and changing patterns of development. Themes such as the significance of colonialism on post-colonial economies and polities, role of the state in the national and global economy, causes of the region's high-speed growth in the 1980s and 1990s, subsequent economic downturn and future prospects, changing complexion of foreign investment, significance and operational dynamics of the Overseas Chinese Business Networks, salience of socio-economic and ethnic tensions, contradictions associated with the promotion of open economies within authoritarian political structures, the relationship between economic and political corruption, prominence of political Islam, rise of civil society actors, implications of the national and regional reserve army of labour, efficacy of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the region's economic and security links with Northeast Asia will be analysed.
GOVT6111 Chinese Politics

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Corequisites: Recommended Co-requisites: CHSC6901 for Master of China Public Administration and Master of China Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd Book review (15%), 1x1500wd Literature review (25%), 1x3500wd Essay (50%), 1x Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine the internal governance of the People's Republic of China and aspects of its external relations. It begins by tracing the emergence of the PRC's political system after 1949, focussing on key features of Maoism and the rationale of Post-Mao reforms. It then considers the remarkable economic, demographic and social changes that have occurred in recent years and how China's government has responded to a range of crucial challenges. In particular the unit will provide critical insights into how concepts like democracy, human rights, civil society and 'rule of law' have developed within the Chinese context. Finally the unit will analyse the impact of 'globalization' on China's political system.
GOVT6116 International Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent in intensive session Assessment: 4000wd Essay (50%) and 2hr exam (30%) and Seminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to how states and other actors in the international arena cooperate to build institutions as a response to common problems. After completing the unit students should be able to analyse contemporary international organisations to see how they work, whose interests they serve, and to what degree they attenuate or enhance the power of sovereign states.
GOVT6119 International Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture-seminar/week Assessment: 2x 2700wd Essay (90%), 1x600wd In-class quizzes (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit reviews developments in international security since before World War l, to recent events like September 11 and its aftermath. The principal focus is on developments since the end of the Cold War and the collapse of Communism. The unit takes account of traditional notions about the causes of war and the conditions of peace, as well as changes in the structure and process of contemporary international relations.
GOVT6121 Northeast Asian Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 4000wd Essay (50%) and 2hr exam (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the strategic relationship between the great powers in Northeast Asia, potential arenas of conflict, China and India's rise, Sino-Japanese tensions, North Korea as a potential nuclear weapon's state, inter-Korean relations and the US alliance system. Are we seeing the beginnings of a new security dilemma as Asia's rising powers extend their political and economic influence upsetting the established order? Will they challenge US strategic pre-eminence in the region ushering in a new age of super power competition, or can the region work together towards common security objectives?
GOVT6123 Globalisation and Governance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x3000wd Research essay (40%), 3x 500wd Tutorial papers (30%), 1x1.5hr Examination (20%), 1x Tutorial participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
It is widely believed that we are entering a new era in which the transborder flows of capital, goods, ideas, and people are rapidly transforming human society. 'Globalisation', many claim, threatens the autonomy of nation-states and erodes the power of national governments to provide social protection and promote the nation's economic prosperity. This unit examines not only the causes and mechanisms of this process, but also assesses its social, economic, and political impacts. The views of radicals, transformationalists, skeptics, and institutionalists are compared and criticised. While globalisation is often viewed as a singular process, trending towards a global society, this unit offers a distinctive approach. Globalisation has uneven and highly differentiated impacts, whether harmful or beneficial, and this unevenness is closely associated with the nature of institutions of governance, at both the domestic and international levels.
GOVT6135 Global Environmental Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Essay (50%), Seminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the environment as a political and policy issue. Although relatively recent, the environment has become a full-fledged public policy issue exerting influence in local, national and international arenas. The unit will first focus on the specific features of the policy that influences the capability of contemporary societies to enhance the management of environmental resources and of public goods in general. Second, it discusses the development of environmental policy in Western countries, with a particular emphasis on the European Union. Third, a grid for the analysis of environmental policy will be presented, with a discussion of the main actors (political, institutional and socio-economic) involved in it and of the factors (interests and ideas) influencing their positions. Fourth, the unit briefly discusses environmental conflicts and consensual approaches used for tackling them.
GOVT6147 Foundations of International Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd mid-semester exam (40%), 1x2500wd final exam (40%), 1x1000wd (equivalent) seminar activities (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Why do states behave the way they do? Using a historical perspective, this unit explores the ways in which the different theories of international relations account for what shapes the international system - who are its main actors, what are its determining forces and structures. It examines both how these theories have vied with one another within inter-paradigm debates and how they developed in relation to specific historical events. These theories include realism, idealism, neorealism, neoliberal institutionalism, Marxism, the English school, constructivism, poststructuralism, feminism, post-colonial approaches. While no prior study of international relations is required, a willingness to engage with theoretical thinking and grapple with complex questions of ontology and epistemology is essential.
GOVT6159 Emotions, Agenda Setting, and Public Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1 hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd case study (30%), 1x4000wd essay (60%), seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
From the ban on 'Supertrawlers' to investigating the 'live baiting' of greyhounds, modern public policy addresses contemporary issues in ways that mobilise or mitigate public sentiment. Understanding policymaking increasingly depends on analysing how the emotionality of a topic and the salience of an issue create penalties for actors and may influence policy responses. This unit focuses on the way emotional issues rise on the political agenda and can lead to short-term policy responses
GOVT6223 Topics in Environmental Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x 1000wd Seminar paper (30%), 1x3400wd Essay (50%), 1x600wd equivalent Oral Presentation (10%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will offer a broad overview of a key contemporary issue in environmental politics. Topics could include climate change policy, environmental justice, food security and politics, sustainable cities, or timely issues in the Australian or global context. The goal will be to ground these issues in the relevant literatures of politics and environmental studies. Check with the unit coordinator or Department for the particular topic to be addressed in any given semester.
GOVT6304 Development and World Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Book review (20%), 1x3500wd Essay (50%), 1x1500wd equivalent Class presentation (20%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine critical perspectives on international development. It will explore key questions concerning development, including: Have efforts to 'reduce poverty' been effective? What are the various meanings associated with development concepts like 'building capacity' and 'empowerment'? Is there any consensus about what development is and how to 'do' it? The unit will include an analysis of how much has been learned about development over the last fifty years. Finally, the unit will consider what role might individuals take.
GOVT6314 Terrorism and International Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent in intensive session Assessment: 1x3000wd research essay (50%), 1x1hr final exam (20%), 1x2000wd analytical brief (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a comprehensive theoretical and empirical introduction to the problem of terrorism worldwide and its impact on global security. It will cover the origins of terrorism, the structure and behavior of terrorist organisations, social, political, economic, and technological trends that impact terrorism and the threat it poses, and the complexities of counterterrorism policy. The knowledge and analytical skills acquired by students in this unit will be instrumental in understanding the challenge of terrorism.
GOVT6319 Governance and Public Policy Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6x3hr lectures-tutorials/weeks 1-6, 1x7hr weekend class, 1x4hr weekend class Assessment: 1x3000wd Case study (40%), 1x1500wd equivalent Group presentation (25%), 1x1500wd Take-home exercise (25%), 1x Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course is focused on two major concepts which are mobilised in the explanation of the way we are governed: 'public policy' and 'governance'. It aims to clarify what is meant by these constructs, and how they can be used in the analysis of governing. It examines the argument that 'governance' denotes a change in the way we are governed, and works through a combination of analytic development and detailed empirical cases to establish the significance of these concepts in both the analysis and the practice of governing.
GOVT6331 Public Management and Governance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr in-class group work/week Assessment: 1x3000wd case study (50%), 1x1000wd case study outline (10%), 1x2hr Examination (30%), seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit outlines some of the most important developments in contemporary public management and governance and how these relate to the everyday practices of those working in the public sector. It uses examples drawn from a number of OECD countries to: critically analyse the forces that have driven the move towards 'public management'; examine the theory and practice of 'public governance'; evaluate the merits of these developments; and apply this knowledge to better understand specific developments across different contexts.
GOVT6336 Media Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 3000wd essays (2x50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines politics and media. From the relationship between news media and electoral politics, the study of the intersection of media and power now includes the consideration of new media forms and their relationship with the "soft" politics of representation and performativity.
GOVT6358 Comparative Migration Policy

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4500wd Research Paper (60%), 1x1.5hr Examination (25%), 1x Seminar participation (15%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study covers immigration policy debates in the world's three largest immigrant selecting nations - Australia, Canada and the United States - with additional reference to developments across the European Union. Students will analyse the regulation of skilled, family, asylum and illegal immigration and the determination of the size and composition of immigration programmes. Integration and citizenship policies are also considered. In all of these debates, the role of policy instruments, institutions and actors in the policy process are considered.
HRTD6901 Human Rights: Norms and Mechanisms

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1000wd equivalent participation in class exercises (30%), 1x1500wd research report (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a foundational understanding of the content and philosophical justifications of human rights norms. Philosophical, historical and positivist perspectives will be brought together in this unit to allow students to grasp the content of human rights and the justification for norms that become law and to think about how to develop other justifications in the different cultural and social contexts. Using a case study method it will cover institutional protection mechanisms, including UN treaty and charter bodies.
HRTD6903 Dynamics of Human Rights Violations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x3000wd written assignment (50%), 1x1500wd (equivalent) reflection (40%), Class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Using a case study approach, this unit helps students to analyse the causes and sustaining dynamics of human rights violations along a number of dimensions; cultural, economic, organisational, social and political. Students will then acquire analytic and practical capacities and skills to assess the merits and feasibility of different types of interventions and design intervention strategies. It considers the impact of different types of interventions and the processes available for assessing the human rights impact of other laws, policies or developments.
HRTD6906 The Philosophy of Human Rights

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week Prohibitions: PHIL7607 Assessment: 1x1500wd Take-home exam (35%) and 1x3500wd Essay (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit addresses central themes from the history and philosophy of human rights. Topics may include the relationship between human rights and religion, natural law, moral and aesthetic justifications of human rights, claims and challenges to universality of the part of human rights, and tensions between human rights and state sovereignty. Thinkers may include Saint Paul, Kant, Burke, Tocqueville, Arendt, Schmitt, and Rawls.
HRTD6909 Dissertation Part 1

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x2hr seminar and approximately 6x1hr supervision meetings or equivalent. Prerequisites: A minimum of 12 credit points completed as part of the Master of Human Rights. Departmental permission required Assessment: 1x12000 words towards completion of an 18000wd dissertation in HRTD6911 (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students will conduct original independent research in the areas of human rights and/or democratisation under the academic supervision of a relevant expert. Students enrolled in HRTD6909 are given a pass/fail grade and not numerically assessed on the basis of their progress towards the completion of their dissertation. This unit ensures that students are making adequate and timely progress towards completion of their 18,000 word dissertation.
HRTD6911 Dissertation Part 2

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar and approximately 3x1hr supervision meetings or equivalent. Prerequisites: A minimum of 12 credit points completed as part of the Master of Human Rights (MHR). Departmental permission required. Assessment: 1x6000wds (to complete a 18000wd) dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students will conduct original independent research in the areas of human rights and/or democratisation under the academic supervision of a relevant expert.
HSTY6987 Presenting the Past

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Penny Russell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4000wd essay (75%), 1x1000wd seminar paper (15%) and class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A work of history may range in scope from a single life to the forces of internationalism, from a single moment to the span of human history, from a single locality to the globe. Why, and how, do historians tell such different stories? In this unit we explore the ideologies and social perspectives that underpin the historian's craft. Examining trends in historical scholarship, we consider how engagement with different methodologies has contributed to the social, cultural, intellectual and political 'turns'.
IDEA9103 Design Programming

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Liam Bray Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the development of software in design and the creative industries. It teaches an understanding of the fundamentals of computational thinking, as well as skills in the design and implementation of software for creative expression. It introduces students to tools for building interactive design prototypes that express their interaction design skills through programming. It covers knowledge of programming concepts; creative coding practices; and Javascript and the p5.js library. Key concepts covered in this unit include: variables, functions, control flows, and algorithmic thinking. Students learn how to approach creative expression through the medium of code, which will allow them to incorporate programming into their own design practice as well as to collaborate effectively with software developers. This unit is a foundational core unit in the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Arts program.
IDEA9105 Interface Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Martin Tomitsch Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Design assignments (90%), Quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the fundamentals of user interface design. Interface design is an important element of a human-centred design approach to the development of interactive computational systems. Students will learn about industry standard user interface design and usability principles and guidelines, based in visual design theory and visual perception. They will acquire practical knowledge through the application of tools and techniques for designing and evaluating user interfaces for web and mobile products. The unit increases awareness of good and bad design through observation and evaluation of existing technology, and develops appreciation of visual design principles and their impact on the user experience of interactive products. The knowledge and skills developed in this unit will equip students with the essential capabilities for working in the interaction design and user experience profession. This unit is a foundational core unit in the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Arts program.
IDEA9106 Design Thinking

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Naseem Ahmadpour Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Design assignments (90%), Quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an overview of a human-centred approach to the design of products and systems. It introduces students to design thinking and how it can be productively applied to different design situations. The theoretical concepts, methods and tools for the key stages of interaction design are covered including user research, ideation, prototyping and user evaluation. It provides students with the principles, processes and tools for working collaboratively on design projects in studio. Students learn to build empathy with users, identify and reframe the problem space, develop value-driven design concepts and persuasively communicate design proposals with an emphasis on the user experience through visual storytelling. This unit is a foundational core unit in the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Arts program.
LAWS6001 Chinese Laws and Chinese Legal Systems

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bing Ling Session: Intensive December Classes: Dec 2-14 Prohibitions: LAWS6857 or LAWS3014 or LAWS3068 or LAWS5368 Assumed knowledge: undergraduate law degree from a common or civil law jurisdiction or LAWS6252 Assessment: 2hr exam to be completed in Shanghai (30%) and 8000wd essay (70%) due in February Practical field work: field school in Shanghai, China Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is not available to students who have completed a law degree in the People's Republic of China. Master of Law and International Development students may undertake this unit as an elective or capstone unit conditional on (i) students must write an essay that focuses on a development topic and (ii) that topic being pre-approved by the Unit Coordinator. Students cannot enrol directly into this unit in Sydney Student. Enrolment instructions will be provided upon successful registration. See https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/4533/pages/postgraduate-coursework-homepage. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html
This unit will provide students with an overall picture of the modern Chinese legal system. It will develop a perception of its unique character by tracing its role through major social epochs and the role of law in a socialist market economy. It will examine the concept of law as a political function and the implementation of law, not so much through courts, as through administrative fiats and authority, making law essentially a function of politics and administration. The unit will illustrate these perceptions through the study of various legal regimes. Lecture topics may include: Chinese legal history; Chinese legal system; criminal law and procedure; constitutional law; civil law and procedure; legal profession; environmental law; contract law; property law; company law; intellectual property law; foreign joint ventures; arbitration and mediation; foreign trade law and taxation law. The coursework component of the unit is residential and is conducted on the campus of the East China University of Politics and Law in Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Lectures will be given in English in Shanghai by professors from the East China University of Politics and Law. There will also be a visit to a Chinese law firm.
LAWS6039 Discrimination in the Workplace

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Belinda Smith Session: Intensive August Classes: Intro Class: Jul 24 (6-8) then Aug 10, 11 and 24, 25 (9-5) Assessment: Three components of assessment and students can choose the weighting: Regime A - class participation (0%), online short-answer quiz (35%) and 5500 wd essay (65%); or Regime B - class participation (15%), online short-answer quiz (25%) and 5500 wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: MLLR students may enrol in this unit before completing LAWS6071 Labour Law, but must have either completed or be concurrently enrolled in LAWS6252 Legal Reasoning and the Common Law System.
In this unit we examine the nature of discrimination in the workplace and the legal response to it in Australia. We start by considering the theoretical perspectives on equality that underpin our legislation and ideas about effective regulation. We then examine how anti-discrimination law is applied in respect of a number of different grounds of discrimination - such as sex, race, disability, and family responsibilities - reviewing recent cases and current issues. We will also discuss enforcement mechanisms and processes under anti-discrimination legislation and what, if any, effect the legislation has had on workplace processes and culture. While NSW law will be considered, the focus will be on federal legislation, looking at anti-discrimination laws, anti-discrimination provisions in the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth), and the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012 (Cth).
LAWS6044 Environmental Law and Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Rosemary Lyster (Coordinator), Dr Gerry Bates Session: Intensive March Classes: Mar 6-9 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS3430 or LAWS5130 Assumed knowledge: LAWS6252 or law degree from a common law jurisdiction Assessment: 2000wd essay (25%) and assignment (75%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students who do not hold a law degree from a common law jurisdiction must either have completed or be concurrently enrolled in LAWS6252 Legal Reasoning and the Common Law System before undertaking the environmental law units. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
The aim of the unit is to introduce students to overarching themes in environmental law and policy as a foundation to their more detailed studies for the Environmental Law Program. This is an overview unit addressing a number of environmental issues at various levels of analysis; such as policy making, implementation of policy and dispute resolution. The concept of ecologically sustainable development and its implications for environmental law and policy is a continuing theme. The unit is designed to develop multi-dimensional thinking about environmental issues and the strategies needed to address them. The unit provides a broad background of the political and economic issues in so far as they are related to the legal issues involved.
LAWS6047 Law of the Sea

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ed Couzens Session: Intensive November Classes: Oct 17, 18 and 24, 25 (9-5) Assessment: 5000wd essay (60%) and take-home exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The oceans cover two-thirds of the world's surface, and are vital to international commerce, are a store of important living and non-living resources, and provide indispensable environmental services including stabilising the global climate system. This unit reviews the major areas of the law of the sea as it has developed over the centuries. The unit takes as its focus the 'constitution' of the oceans, the 1982 UN Convention on the Law of the Sea and also considers a range of other international conventions and agreements, and current state practice. Each of the major maritime zones is assessed, and there is also a detailed review of several sectoral issues, including the protection of the marine environment, fisheries, navigational rights and freedoms, and military uses of the oceans. Where appropriate, reference will be made throughout the unit to relevant Australian law and practice, and to other state practice in the Asia Pacific Region.
LAWS6059 International Business Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Em Prof Gabriel Moens Session: Intensive October Classes: Sep 13, 14 and 20, 21 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS3438 or LAWS5138 Assumed knowledge: Students who do not hold a law degree from a common or civil law jurisdiction must either have completed or be concurrently enrolled in LAWS6252 Legal Reasoning and the Common Law System before enrolling in this unit. Assessment: 3500wd essay (50%) and 1.5hr exam (50%) or 3hr exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
The objective of this unit is to provide students with an introduction to a number of areas of international business law and to provide an opportunity to study some of those areas in more detail. It begins with an examination of the concept of free trade, the international structures and organizations that have been created to foster the liberalization of international trade, and the scope of the law relating to international business transactions. The unit highlights the importance of ethics in international business and introduces students to the OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act 1977 (US) and the Bribery Act 2010 (UK). It then focuses on the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale Goods (CISG), followed by a consideration of International Commercial Terms (Incoterms 2000 and Incoterms 2010) and carriage of goods, especially carriage of goods by sea. The course then deals with the Uniform Customs and Practice for Documentary Credits (UCP600), financing of exports and methods of doing business in foreign markets, including through agents and distributors and international licensing transactions. Other topics may vary from year to year and may include an introduction to international tax, the World Trade Organization (WTO), including anti-dumping and countervailing duties law and international dispute settlement, especially international commercial arbitration.
Textbooks
Burnett and Bath, Law of International Business in Australasia (Federation press, 2009)
LAWS6061 International Environmental Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ed Couzens Session: Intensive April Classes: Apr 5, 6 and 12, 13 (9-5) Assessment: compulsory in-class practical assessment (40%) and assignment (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
This unit aims to provide an introduction to the framework, concepts, sources and techniques of international environmental law, and to provide an overview of international law responses to current and emerging environmental challenges. The history and framework of international environmental law will be examined before exploring a range of topical international environmental law issues, including atmospheric protection and climate change, hazardous substances and wastes, biodiversity and GMOs, the protection of marine living resources, the protection of freshwater resources and issues concerning trade. The unit will also survey the influence of international environmental law on domestic environmental law through case studies. Overarching themes will include the interdependence of environmental issues, the effects of scientific uncertainty on international environmental regulation, implementation of international environmental obligations between states at difference levels of economic development and the need for effectiveness in implementation and enforcement.
LAWS6071 Labour Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Joellen Riley Session: Intensive April Classes: Mar 15, 16 and Apr 5, 6 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS5146 Assumed knowledge: MLLR students must either have a law degree or completed or be concurrently enrolled in LAWS6252 Legal Reasoning and the Common Law System (core) as well as this unit before undertaking the labour law elective units Assessment: 1500wd assignment (20%) and assignment (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: The unit is compulsory for students enrolled in the MLLR. However, the requirement to take this unit may be waived upon application to the Program Coordinator if the student can demonstrate proficiency in the unit objectives gained through completing a recent undergraduate law unit in labour law or work experience. Credit will not be granted for WORK6116 Employment and the Law and completion of this unit will not be sufficient to obtain an exemption from this MLLR compulsory unit. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
The purpose of this unit is to introduce students to the principles of labour law. It is designed specifically for MLLR students who do not have a law degree or for any students with a law degree who have not recently undertaken an undergraduate labour law course. The goal of the unit is to equip students with the fundamental principles of labour law that they will need to undertake more advanced labour law units within the MLLR and LLM Degrees. It provides an introduction to the contract of employment and the relevant principles governing the employment relationship, including termination of employment. It then introduces students to the workplace relations framework including collective bargaining and industrial conflict; the modern role of awards and statutory regulation of wages and conditions.
Textbooks
A Stewart, A Forsyth, M Irving, R Johnstone and S McCrystal, Creighton and Stewart's Labour Law, 6th ed, Federation Press, Sydney, 2016
LAWS6128 Comparative International Taxation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Brian Arnold Session: Intensive November Classes: Oct 29, 30 and Nov 4, 5 (9-5) Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students undertaking this unit have successfully completed an undergraduate/postgraduate unit of study in tax law. Assessment: in-class test (20%) and 2hr exam (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
Comparative International Taxation is a detailed study of the basic principles of international taxation (residence, source, relief from international double taxation, anti-deferral rules, withholding tax, transfer pricing, thin capitalisation, and tax treaties). The unit is taught from a global perspective with the emphasis being on comparative analysis (focusing particularly on Anglo, US and continental European approaches, and also developed and developing country approaches). The unit examines the core issues in developing international tax rules and identifies different approaches countries have taken in dealing with these issues. As part of this study, recent trends in international tax rule development will be identified (particularly in the context of globalisation) and critiqued. Students should gain an understanding of the different approaches that countries have taken in the development of their international tax rules.
LAWS6161 International Human Rights

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Jacqueline Mowbray Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Prohibitions: GOVT6117 Assessment: 2000wd assignment (30%) and 5000wd essay (70%) or 7000wd (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Available to MLLR students who commenced after Jan 2015. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
This unit introduces students to the principles and practice of international human rights law - a field of public international law and policy of ever-expanding dimensions. It will introduce students to some key concepts, debates, documents and institutions in this field, while encouraging critical examination of these from a variety of angles. In summary, this unit considers the question: what happens when we regard a situation or predicament as one involving a breach of international human rights law - what possibilities and problems does this entail? Addressing this question, students in this unit will examine: (a) forums where international human rights law is being produced (international tribunals, domestic courts, multilateral bodies - including United Nations organs - regional agencies, non-governmental organisations, academic institutions, and the media); (b) settings where international human rights law is being deployed (in Australia and elsewhere); and (c) particular identities/subjects that international human rights law aspires to shape, regulate or secure. By the end of this unit, students should be able to formulate written and oral arguments by reference to key international human rights law instruments and principles; give strategic advice as to available avenues of recourse in international human rights law; and advance an informed critique of particular dimensions of international human rights law scholarship and practice, by reference to contemporary literature in this field.
LAWS6163 Energy and Climate Law

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Rosemary Lyster Session: Intensive September Classes: Sep 1, 2 & 8, 9 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6863 Assessment: class participation (20%) and 7000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit addresses one of the most pressing global environmental concerns - global climate change. The unit explains the science of climate change and undertakes a detailed assessment of the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), including the 2015 Paris Agreement. All aspects of the UNFCCC are discussed including emissions reduction, climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction, and the issue of climate displaced persons. Given that the burning of fossil fuels to produce energy is the primary cause of climate change, the unit looks at energy consumption patterns around the world and in Australia. It also assesses the legislative and market-based tools to reduce emissions including carbon trading schemes and renewable energy schemes around the world and at the Federal and state government levels in Australia. Climate adaptation and disaster risk reduction provisions in Australia are compared and contrasted with those in the United States and the European Union.
LAWS6167 International Law II

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alison Pert Session: Intensive September Classes: Aug 23, 24 and Sep 6, 7 (9-5) Assumed knowledge: LAWS6243 Assessment: 5000wd essay (60%) and assignment (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Compulsory core unit for MIL and GradDipIntLaw students who commenced prior to 1 January 2019. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
This unit of study consolidates and builds upon knowledge gained in LAWS6243 International Law I. The relationship between international law and domestic law is explored in depth, both in a comparative perspective and with reference to the impact of international law on Australian law and legal institutions. The unit also addresses specialist topics not covered, or only briefly covered, in LAWS6243 International Law I, which may include a more detailed examination of the limits of state jurisdiction, the role of the individual in international law, international human rights, and the right of states to respond to international wrongs. Other topics of current interest in public international law will also be examined, with students given an appreciation of the role and relevance of international law in major events in contemporary international affairs.
LAWS6198 Refugee Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Mary Crock Session: Intensive October Classes: Sep 20, 21 and Oct 4, 5 (9-5) Assessment: class participation (30%) and 6000wd essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
Refugee Law provides students with a practical and theoretical understanding of the development and operation of international refugee law, and forced migration more broadly. Forced migration is not a new phenomenon. What has changed over the last century is the scale and frequency of the conflagrations causing the mass movement of peoples and the ease with which individuals have become able to move around the world in search of protection. Although Australia's experience of direct refugee flows has been limited, it has not escaped the phenomenon of mobile refugees. Non-citizens who come uninvited and thereafter seek protection as refugees are the source of inordinate public concern and debate. The controversy arises in part from a sense of loss of control of immigration, and also from the cost of the processes available to asylum seekers fighting to remain here. Having signed and ratified the key international treaties, Australia has assumed certain international legal obligations with respect to refugees. The most important is the obligation not to return or 'refoule' a refugee to a place where she or he faces persecution on one of five grounds. This unit is designed to give students a critical understanding of the international legal regime of refugee protection. It begins with an overview of the evolution of refugee law at the international level, considering the various conceptualizations of refugeehood that have characterized international agreements from the period of the League of Nations through to the present day. The unit then turns to issues such as the definition of the term 'refugee' under international (and regional) law, the express exclusion of certain persons from refugee status, the rights and obligations accorded to refugees, the broadening of international protection through principles of human rights and humanitarian law ('complementary protection'), and the impact of terrorism on asylum procedures and eligibility. It considers attempts by States to restrict access to asylum through mechanisms such as carrier sanctions, interdiction, transit processing centres, detention, and 'safe third countries' to which asylum seekers may be removed. Contemporary protection concerns, such as mass influx situations and temporary protection, flight from generalized violence and civil war, internal displacement, burden-sharing, and the question of 'economic migrants' and 'environmental refugees', are also addressed. These considerations necessarily require an understanding of the role of international organizations such UNHCR, the mechanisms in place for refugee status determination and appeals in Australia and abroad, and the jurisprudence that has developed internationally and in Australia relating to the qualification and rights of asylum seekers, refugees and other persons in need of protection.
LAWS6218 International Humanitarian Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Emily Crawford Session: Intensive August Classes: Aug 9, 10 and 16, 17 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS3483 or LAWS5183 Assessment: class participation (20%), assignment (10%) and 7000wd essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
How to limit and regulate violence in times of war or armed conflict is one of the most pressing challenges for international law. This unit introduces you to the principles and practices of international humanitarian law ('IHL'), also known as the laws of war or the law of armed conflict, including treaty law and customary international humanitarian law. This unit explores: the origins, purposes, sources and critiques of IHL; its scope of application (spatial, temporal and personal); the different types and thresholds of conflict (including international, non-international and 'transnational' conflicts); the status and treatment of combatants and non-combatants and other categories (such as spies, 'unlawful combatants' and 'terrorists'); the permissible means and methods of warfare (including the principles of distinction and proportionality, and prohibitions and restrictions on certain weapons such as chemical, biological and nuclear weapons); the difference in rules governing international armed conflicts (IACs) and those governing non-international armed conflicts (NIACs); the relationship between international human rights law and IHL; and the relationship between the international terrorism suppression regime and IHL.
LAWS6243 International Law I

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alison Pert Session: Intensive April,Semester 2 Classes: S1CIAP (Group A): Mar 15, 16 and 22, 23 (9-5) and S2C (Group B): 1x2-hr lecture/week Prohibitions: LAWS1023 or LAWS5005 Assessment: 5000wd essay (60%) and assignment (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This unit is compulsory for MIL and GradDipIntLaw students who have not completed any previous study in international law and must be taken during the first semester of candidature. This unit is not available to MLawIntDev students who have been granted a reduced volume of learning. This unit is available as one of the core units for GradDipIntBusLaw students. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
This unit provides an introduction to public international law. Its purpose is to ensure that students have a thorough understanding of the core principles and problems of, and contemporary issues in, international law. The unit covers the following topics: nature and scope of public international law, sources of public international law, international legal personality, the law of treaties, how title to territory is acquired, state jurisdiction in international law, immunity from jurisdiction, state responsibility for international wrongs, dispute settlement, and the legality of the use of force.
LAWS6257 Public Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Patricia Apps Session: Intensive September Classes: Sep 5, 6 and 12, 13 (10-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6139 or LAWS6042 or LAWS6113 or LAWS6984 Assessment: 1000wd essay (10%), class presentation (10%), 5000-7000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Core unit for MALP students. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
The aim of the unit is to provide an understanding of the role of government policy within the analytical framework of welfare economics. Questions of central interest include: What are the conditions that justify government intervention? How can policies be designed to support basic principles of social justice? What kinds of reforms promote economic efficiency? Applications will range from taxation and social security to environmental regulation and protection, and will cover the following specific topics: The structure of the Australian tax-benefit system; Uncertainty and social insurance; Unemployment, health and retirement income insurance; Externalities, environmental taxes and tradeable permits; Monopoly and environmental regulation; Utility pricing and access problems; Cost benefit analysis, intergenerational equity and growth. The unit will provide an overview of the main empirical methodologies used in evaluating policy reforms in these areas. Students may select to specialise in one or more of the policy areas.
LAWS6302 Human Rights and Environmental Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kate Owens (Coordinator), Prof Rosemary Lyster Session: Intensive June Classes: May 17, 18 and 24, 25 (9-5) Assessment: class participation (20%) and 8000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
The unit aims to provide students with an overview of the recent development of links between environmental law and human rights at both international and national levels. It will initially introduce the principles of international environmental law, and the relationship between the environment and human rights, with both ecocentric and anthropocentric approaches to be canvassed. The right to development, and especially the linkage between poverty, development and the environment, will be explored. Individual topics will include the relationships between human rights and pollution, land degradation, climate change, water security, implications of international trade, Indigenous peoples, biodiversity, genetic resources and access to nature. The human rights dimensions of environmental, cultural and social impact assessments will also be included. The unit will conclude with a discussion of the issue of access to environmental justice as an aspect of human rights, and the institutions relevant to achieving environmental justice.
Textbooks
DK Anton and DL Shelton, Environmental Protection and Human Rights, Cambridge 2011
LAWS6308 Philosophy of Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Wojciech Sadurski Session: Intensive August Classes: Jul 18-24 Assessment: Pre-class reaction note (20%), class participation (20%) and take-home exam (60%). Attendance at all classes is compulsory. Students will not be eligible to submit their exam unless they have attended all classes (except in the case of serious illness or misadventure). Practical field work: Sydney Law School in Europe Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students cannot enrol directly into this unit in Sydney Student. Enrolment instructions will be provided upon successful registration. See https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/4533/pages/postgraduate-coursework-homepage. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html.
The main objective of this unit is to provide a critical understanding of the fundamental principles of legal theory and philosophy of law. The unit will discuss, in particular, the concept of law, the notions of obligation, authority, and legitimacy of law; the main theories of legal interpretation; the special role of the concept of "rights" in legal theory, and the principles determining the moral limits of legal coercion.
LAWS6825 Introduction to Australian Business Tax

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Law School Groups - Intensive March S1CIMR (Group A): Prof Graeme Cooper and Intensive August S2CIAU (Group B): Assoc Prof Celeste Black Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive March Classes: Law School Groups - Intensive March S1CIMR (Group A): Mar 6-8 and 11, 12 (9-3.30) and Intensive August S2CIAU (Group B): Aug 14-16 and 19, 20 (9-3.30) Assessment: class work/test (30%) and 2hr exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
This unit introduces the basic elements of Australia's income tax (including fringe benefits tax and capital gains tax), with an emphasis on their impact on businesses, whether conducted directly or via a partnership, trust or company.
The unit covers the following topics: the main structural features of the tax system; assessability of business revenue; treatment of business expenses; timing rules for revenue and expense recognition; trading forms (companies, partnerships, trusts), capital raising and costs of servicing invested capital; cross-border issues; anti-avoidance rules.
The unit is intended for participants who have not undertaken a recent and thorough undergraduate unit (or postgraduate equivalent) in Australian income tax. Participants are primarily from two groups: (a) foreign students who have studied their own domestic tax system and now wish to acquire a detailed knowledge of the operation of the Australian tax system; and (b) Australian graduates in law, commerce, accounting, or other disciplines, who have not previously studied income tax. This unit is suitable as both an entry-level precursor to the more specialised units offered in the Tax Program and as a unit for practitioners and others who do not seek to be tax specialists but want to improve their general understanding of the tax ramifications of commercial operations.
LAWS6827 Legal Responsibility and Philosophy of Mind

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adj Prof Christopher Birch Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: class participation exercise (20%) and 6000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Many legal doctrines in both criminal and civil law depend upon being able to characterise conduct as intentional, leading to ascriptions of fault, blame or responsibility. Most serious criminal offences depend upon establishing mens rea as a relevant mental element. Civil liability is often dependent upon whether conduct was intended, or whether the cause of loss was brought about by either intentional conduct or conduct involving some lesser notion of fault. All of these doctrines make important assumptions about the nature of our mental states and the operation of mind. Many of these assumptions are philosophically controversial and current developments in the philosophy of mind may lead us to reconsider or radically revise our attitudes to the law. The unit will look at contemporary philosophical work on free will consciousness, mind, and causation and apply this work to present problems in regard to concepts of legal responsibility.
Textbooks
Lowe, EJ An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind, Cambridge U.P., Cambridge 2000
LAWS6846 Human Rights and the Global Economy

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Kinley Session: Intensive May Classes: May 18, 19 and 25, 26 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS5178 or LAWS3478 Assessment: class participation (20%), 7000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Master of Law and International Development students may undertake this unit as an elective or capstone unit
The questions of whether and how the global economy and human rights interrelate and interact have excited much recent controversy on the streets, in the courts and legislatures, in corporate board rooms and in the corridors of the UN and the international trade and financial organizations. It is a controversy that will almost certainly intensify over the next few years. The debate is controversial because it is important, and it is important because it involves two great globalizing forces namely, the promotion of free market ideology through trade liberalization and the protection of human rights through the universalization of the norms that underpin human dignity. On the face of it the two projects do sit easily together. Are they, in fact, implacably opposed to each other? Where or how do they overlap and what are the consequences or opportunities presented thereby? What role can the law play in regulating their interaction whether it be domestic or international law, 'hard' or 'soft' law. And what or who are the real actors behind the economic and human rights power blocs on the global stage? This unit seeks both to frame these questions and to address them by reference to the most recent discussion, thinking and action in the area.
LAWS6852 Doing Business in China

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Vivienne Bath Session: Intensive May Classes: Apr 20, 21 and May 4, 5 Assumed knowledge: Students who do not hold a law degree from a common or civil law jurisdiction must either have completed or be concurrently enrolled in LAWS6252 Legal Reasoning and the Common Law System before enrolling in this unit. Assessment: 3500wd essay (50%) and take-home exam (50%) or take-home exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to provide an introduction to the legal and practical aspects of doing business in China. The unit will commence with an overview of the Chinese legal, political and economic system and will then move on to an examination of the system of commercial regulation in China, including contracts, land use, regulation of private and state-owned businesses and Chinese companies and securities laws. The unit will focus on Chinese contract law and the foreign investment regime and the related structuring and regulatory issues related to foreign participation in the Chinese market. Areas covered will discuss the principal issues relating to the establishment of a corporate or other presence in China and the related negotiation process. The unit will conclude with an examination of methods of resolution of disputes arising under contracts entered into in China. More specialized topics which may be covered include intellectual property, labour law, regulation of financial institutions and Chinese investment overseas.
LAWS6877 Mental Illness: Law and Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adj Prof Duncan Chappell Session: Intensive September Classes: Aug 19, 20 and Sep 5, 6 (9-5) Assessment: 3000wd assignment (40%) and 4500wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
This unit deals with the law relating to mental health issues in Australia including human rights principles. Background material on the nature and incidence of mental illness, psychiatric and medical issues, as well criminological and public policy literature will be considered where relevant. The unit covers substantive issues from civil treatment, welfare law, and criminal law. Topics covered will include: the social context of mental illness and the current and historical approaches to treatment of the mentally ill; contemporary State, Territorial and Federal involvement in mental health policy and legislation; the present framework of NSW mental health law and related welfare law including the Mental Health Act, Guardianship Act, Protected Estates Act and Mental Health (Criminal Procedure) Act; the process of scheduling persons with a mental illness; review mechanisms including the roles of the medical superintendent, magistrates, the mental health review tribunal and the Supreme Court; longer term detention of the mentally ill; community treatment and community counselling orders; protected estates and guardianship orders; electroconvulsive therapy; consent to surgery and special medical treatment; the defence of not guilty on the grounds of mental illness, the review of forensic patients and the exercise of the executive discretion; the issue of unfitness to be tried; the involuntary treatment of prisoners in the correctional system; and proposals and options for reform.
LAWS6920 Global Health Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lawrence Gostin Session: Intensive July Classes: Jul 9-12 (10-5.30) Assessment: Option 1: 7000wd essay (80%) and simulation participation and contribution (20%) or Option 2: 4000wd essay (50%), simulation participation and contribution (20%) and assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
Today, domestic health and global health are recognized as intertwined and inseparable. The determinants of health (e.g. pathogens, air, water, goods, and lifestyle choices) are increasingly international in origin, expanding the need for health governance structures that transcend traditional and increasingly inadequate national approaches. In this unit, students will gain an in-depth understanding of global health law through careful examination of the major contemporary problems in global health, the principal international legal instruments governing global health, the principal international organizations, and innovative solutions for global health governance in the 21st Century. Class sessions will consist of a combination of lecture and interactive discussion, culminating in a global health law simulation. The class will cover naturally occurring infectious diseases (e.g. extensively drug resistant tuberculosis, malaria, Zika virus, and HIV/AIDS), past (e.g., SARS, influenza A H1N1 and Ebola) and future (e.g., Influenza pandemics), bioterrorism events (e.g., anthrax or smallpox), and/or major chronic diseases caused by modern lifestyles (e.g., obesity or tobacco use).
Textbooks
Lawrence O. Gostin, Global Health Law (March 2014) available from Harvard University Press or Amazon.com
LAWS6928 Law, Justice and Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adj Prof Livingston Armytage Session: Intensive June Classes: May 17, 18 and 24, 25 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS3478 or LAWS5178 Assessment: class participation (10%), journal (10%) and 2x3000wd essays (2x40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit is compulsory for MLawIntDev students. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
This unit provides a critical overview to law and justice reform in international development. It analyses the global reform experience over the past half-century. It interrogates the nature and justification(s) of reform 'theory', studies the empirical evidence of various approaches, and examines the conceptual/practical challenges of evaluating development endeavour, using case studies from the Asia/Pacific region. Students enrolling in this unit will develop an evidence-based understanding of the use of law and justice reform in broader development strategies.
LAWS6940 Theories of Law

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin Walton Session: Intensive June Classes: Jun 2, 3 & 9, 10 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS5169 or LAWS3469 Assessment: class participation (20%) and 8000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit seeks to facilitate critical reflection on prominent responses of theorists to a single question: what is law? Among the notions to which their answers refer (and on which the unit focuses) are the following: power, norms, rules, principles, convention, morality, adjudication and interpretation.
LAWS6945 Doing Business in Emerging Markets

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Paul Stephan Session: Intensive September Classes: Aug 30, 31, Sep 1 & 4, 5 (9-3.30) Assessment: class participation (30%) and assignment (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The unit examines common commercial, tax and regulatory issues that arise from doing business in emerging market economies. Topics to be examined include: the special challenges of investing in emerging market economies; organisational forms commonly used in emerging market economics; financing options; host state regulatory regimes and limits on the activities of foreign investors; dispute resolution systems, and sovereign risk issues; tax issues in developing countries; home state regulatory issues, including domestic anti-corruption measures, money laundering and human rights regimes. The unit has a special focus on issues associated with investing into and doing business with former Soviet Union countries, and the famous Yukos case will be considered.
LAWS6974 Development, Law and Human Rights

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Kinley Session: Intensive February Classes: Jan 27-Feb 9 Assessment: assignment (30%) and 8000wd essay (70%) Practical field work: field school in Nepal Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students cannot enrol directly into this unit in Sydney Student. Enrolment instructions will be provided upon successful registration. See https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/4533/pages/postgraduate-coursework-homepage. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html.
This unit exposes students to the role and limits of law in addressing acute problems of socio-economic development and human rights in developing countries, through an interactive field school conducted over two weeks in Nepal, one of the world's poorest countries. The themes to be explored are likely to include: The transition from armed conflict to peace in the aftermath of a Maoist insurgency and the end of the monarchy in Nepal (including issues of transitional criminal justice, the drafting of a new constitution, and building a new legal and political system in light of Nepalese legal traditions and foreign legal influences); The protection of socio-economic rights (including rights to food, water, housing, and livelihoods), minority rights (of 'tribals', and 'dalits' in the caste system), and the 'right to development' under constitutional and international law; The interaction between local disputes over natural resources, human displacement caused by development projects, environmental protection and climate change in the context of fragile Himalayan ecologies; The legal protection of refugees (Tibetan or Bhutanese) in camp or mass influx situations, in the context of the limited resources of a developing country and the causes of, and solutions to, human displacement; and The experience of women in development and human rights processes. The issues will be drawn together by reflection upon the influence of, and resistance to, human rights and international law in developmental processes.
LAWS6977 Law of International Institutions

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Dr August Reinisch Session: Intensive February Classes: Feb 13-15 & 17 (9-5) Prohibitions: GOVT6116 Assumed knowledge: LAWS6243 International Law I or equivalent unit in public international law Assessment: take-home exam (20%) and 8000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will examine the principal legal issues concerning organizations composed of states. These include the legal status and powers of organizations, membership and participation, norm-creation, dispute settlement, enforcement of decisions, peace and security activities, and finally the organizations' privileges and immunities as well as their legal status and powers under national law.
At the same time, the unit will also address such real world problems as the creation of international criminal courts, the "succession" of Russia to the USSR's seat on the UN Security Council, the response to the break-up of Yugoslavia, targeted sanctions and the possibility of judicial review of acts of the UN Security Council, the success of WTO dispute settlement, NATO action against Serbia in 1999, the military intervention in Afghanistan and Iraq in the aftermath of 9/11, etc.
Primary consideration will be given to the development of the United Nations. Other universal as well as regional organizations will also be dealt with. This unit aims at helping students to understand the common legal problems faced by international institutions.
Textbooks
Jan Klabbers, An Introduction to International Institutional Law. Cambridge (CUP, 2nd ed., 2009) Paperback (ISBN-13: 9780521736169)
LNGS7001 Structure of Language

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 3x667wd equivalent assignments (30%), 1x1000wd essay (20%), 1x3000wd final essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The fundamental tool for human communication is language. This unit explores the fundamental properties of human language, with examples from languages spoken in every part of the world. We look at the sounds of human language: how the speech organs make them, and how different they can be across languages. We gain a detailed understanding of English consonants and vowels. We investigate the ways in which sounds can convey meanings, through the formation of words and sentences in English and many other languages.
LNGS7002 Language, Society and Power

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr seminar/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x4000wd Research project (80%), 1x1000wd Online discussion (10%), 1x1000wd Quiz (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Language is a symbolic currency: mastery of the standard language can buy institutional power, mastery of urban teenage slang can buy street cred. This course introduces students to key issues in sociolinguistics and language sociology such as the political economy of language, language variation and change, and critical discourse analysis. Members of the class will undertake empirical research.
LNGS7109 Language and Identity

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x6000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the expression of social identities and relationships through language, including the connections between social group style-shifting and registers.
LNGS7274 Media Discourse

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x500wd Summary (5%), 1x2500wd Image analysis/interpretation (35%), 1x3000wd Text Analysis (60%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
"Sexy, healthy and 100% Australian-owned!" This unit examines linguistic approaches to media discourse. The language of news texts and television series will form a special focus of the unit, along with how images are used to construe meaning. We will explore general aspects of media institutions (news and television), the ways in which social identities are constructed in the media, differences between the language of various types of media texts, the rhetoric of persuasion and the discourses of popular culture.
MECO6912 Political Public Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x Seminar participation (10%), 1x2000wd Campaign proposal (30%), 1x2000wd Campaign presentation (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study analyses and examines the convergence of public relations, advertising and political consulting in the history of political campaigning. The unit's objectives are to demonstrate an understanding of the relationships that exist in the political process between politicians, the media and public relations. It develops student skills specific to the delivery of political public relations and political campaigns. Its focus is the process of professionalisation and internationalisation of electioneering and campaign practices in media-centred democracies.
MECO6913 Public Opinion, Policy and Public Sphere

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Report (20%), 1x1500wd Stakeholder position paper (20%), 1x500wd Presentation (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (45%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit analyses the relationship between professional communication and public opinion. It focuses on theories of influence and persuasion in the context of the development of policy, and how these are reflected in the public sphere. It develops the notion of the public sphere as represented by Habermas, Fraser, Schudson and others, focusing in particular on the transformation of the public sphere in terms of postmodern public relations.
MECO6916 Editing and Proofreading

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd equiv structural edit (30%), 1x1500wd equiv copyedit fiction (30%), 1x500wd plain English exercise (15%), 1x1000wd equiv copyedit nonfiction (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students will develop the skills of structural editing, copyediting and proofreading, on screen and paper, across a range of content for both print and digital output. They will understand the significance of the roles of the editor and proofreader and how these roles have been affected by technological change and globalisation.
MECO6930 Publication Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x250wd equivalent Text title design (15%), 1x250wd equivalent Mood board (15%), 1x1000wd equivalent Production print draft layout (20%), 1x3000wd equivalent Digital magazine (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Publication design focuses on the design and production of magazines and other small-scale publications in print and online form. The unit of study explores the visual language of contemporary magazines and introduces students to basic design principles. Students learn about the complex interplay of text, image and sequence occurring in magazine design through the practical experience of creating their own publication using Adobe InDesign software. The unit links creative design processes to current digital and print practice.
MECO6934 Social Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (25%), 1x2500wd team project report (45%), 1x1000wd team project presentation (15%), 1x1500wd weeekly discussion (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Social Marketing integrates marketing concepts with other approaches to influence behaviours that benefit individuals and communities. Examples include smoking cessation, HIV prevention and recycling. Key elements include research, theory, competition and segmentation. This unit builds students' knowledge of how social marketing can be used to facilitate behaviour change and improve social outcomes, including health, environment, economic and education programs. It will include how to design, manage and communicate social and behaviour change programs in Australia and internationally.
MECO6938 The Interview

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1a Classes: Intensive sessions: 26hrs seminar/semester Assessment: 1x2000wd report (30%), 1x1000wd research brief (20%), 1x3000wd or equivalent major project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Interviewing covers a range of styles from the performative to the investigative and is a fundamental skill for media work and much scholarly research. This unit will introduce students to interview research, design and practice for both media and academic outlets. Students will examine best practice examples of a range of interview approaches and techniques, as well as delivering a substantial interview project.
MHST6901 Museum and Heritage: History and Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture and 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: MUSM7033 Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial post and presentation (20%), 1x1500wd short essay (35%), 1x2500wd long essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The historical, cultural and social roles of museums, heritage places and collections are the focus of contemporary debate. This unit examines the relationships between the production of cultural material, its management and display, and audience to understand museum and heritage sites as places of knowledge, politics and power. Current critical and theoretical perspectives incorporate ideas about the production, consumption, contestation and conservation of intangible values, identities, memories, cultural practices and different knowledge systems.
PACS6901 United Nations, Peace and Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive or online Assessment: (600wd equivalent seminar participation (10%), 1x900wd model UN exercise and assignment (15%), 1x900wd model UN reflection report (15%), 1x600wd essay plan (10%), 1x3000wd final essay (50%)) OR ((500wd equivalent online discussion contribution (10%), 1x600wd online Model UN assignment (10%), 1x800wd online reading reflections (15%), 1x600wd Online essay plan (10%), 1x3500wd Online final essay (55%)) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
In this unit students critically examine the role of the United Nations in promoting international peace and security. Contemporary and historical case studies are used to analyse the UN's performance in relation to such activities as peacemaking, peacekeeping, peacebuilding and peace enforcement. We assess the challenges facing the UN in achieving its mandate and implementing reform with a view to attaining peace with justice.
PACS6911 Key Issues in Peace and Conflict Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent online or intensive Prohibitions: SCWK6930 Assessment: Seminar participation (10%), 1x2500wd personal learning journal (30%), 1x3500wd Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Peace and Conflict Studies and the history, philosophy and politics of peace. Students will gain an understanding of the nature and causes of violence, the potential of nonviolence and the means of achieving peace with justice in different conflict settings.
PACS6914 Conflict-Resolving Media

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive August Classes: Intensive delivery over 5 days (total 30hrs) Prohibitions: SCWK6935 Assessment: 2x2500wd Commentaries (80%), Seminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines media representations of conflict and their influence on the behaviour of those involved. It introduces creative ways for journalists, media development workers and media activists to apply principles of conflict resolution. Students diagnose 'war journalism' and 'peace journalism', and analyse conflict in a journalism context. Theories of news and concepts of objectivity and responsibility are critically explored. Students gain practical skills in peace journalism and media activism as well as devising peace journalism interventions in conflict-affected areas.
PACS6915 Human Rights, Peace and Justice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or online equivalent Prohibitions: SCWK6941 Assessment: (1x500wd participation and presentation (10%), 1x1500wd short assignment (25%), 1x500wd essay plan (10%), 1x3500wd final essay (55%)) OR (1x500wd online discussion contribution (10%), 1x1500wd online short assignment (25%), 1x500wd online essay plan (10%), 1x3500wd online final essay (55%)) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit explores the interrelationship between human rights, peace and justice in theory and in practice. We examine the philosophical underpinnings, legal instruments, political strategies and ethical challenges involved in understanding and attaining human rights locally and globally. Students will engage in debates about global responsibilities for the prevention and prosecution of mass human rights violations as well as specific rights such as those of women, refugees and indigenous peoples and how they contribute to peace with justice.
PACS6928 Community Mediation: Theory and Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Main Classes: 2hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 1x1500wd equiv seminar participation/role plays (25%), 1x1500wd reflective journal (25%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on the theory and practical application of facilitation, communication and conflict resolution skills in a community mediation context. Students will learn about various models of community mediation and will become skilled in the stages of community mediation through role-plays and simulation exercises. In addition to specific training in community mediation, the unit provides students with transferable skills and knowledge about mediation.
PMGT5875 Project Innovation Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Innovation is widely-recognised as a major driver of economic growth. Yet innovation projects can be difficult to manage: they typically involve a high level of uncertainty, and many organisations are unsatisfied with the level of innovation they achieve. In this unit of study, we focus on issues in the management of innovation projects at the individual project level, organisational level and across networks of organisations. Since a systematic approach can and does improve our effectiveness in managing innovation, we begin by exploring several different process models of the stages through which innovation projects are managed. We discuss context and challenges which impact such projects, as well as the concepts of creativity and intellectual property management. Using focused case studies, we analyse best practice in the structures and processes that organisations can provide to enable innovation, as well as to support the search, selection, implementation, dissemination, feedback and evaluation stages of their innovative projects. We also examine the impact of networks on innovation (e.g. collaboration networks), national innovation policies and systems, and trends towards open innovation.
PMGT5888 Global Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This course has been designed to suggest the development of best practices in communication, collaboration and management across international borders. The objectives are to: Understand the challenges faced by a global program and project teams; and, Improve the overall skills and practices of global project managers that will lead international companies to achieve maturity in global project management. Topics include: Introduction to traditional, distributed, and virtual project work; Global projects and requirements; Organisational change and organisational theory; Cross-cultural collaboration; Global project leadership; Trust building and conflict resolution; Coaching over distance; Global communication and channels; Leading a global organisation; Implementing collaborative tools; and, Implementing a Global Project Management Framework.
PMGT5898 Complex Project Leadership

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, E-Learning, Workgroups Prohibitions: WORK6130 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit offers students an innovative way of looking at projects and programs and treating them as complex adaptive systems. Applying the principles of complexity and systems thinking assists project and program managers and leadership teams in formulating approaches to leadership of challenging and large-scale initiatives. The expected outcomes of this unit include development of: ability to diagnose complexity on a wide range of projects types; understanding of how systems thinking and complexity theories can be used to find new, creative ways to think about and lead complex projects and programs; ability to select and apply a range of systems thinking and management modelling tools and techniques to understanding, management and leadership of complex business problems; ability to reflect upon your own practice and develop self awareness as a key to leadership in the face of complexity.
SCLG6901 Citizenship Rights and Social Movements

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SCWK6901 Assessment: 1500wd reading journal (30%) and 2500wd research essay (50%) and 1000wd equivalent oral presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
This unit will provide an analysis of theories and practices of citizenship rights in Australia, other Anglophone countries and European countries in the 20th and 21st centuries. It will examine the relationships between different modes of citizenship, claims for rights and the formation of social movements with regard to the women's movement, Indigenous movements (where applicable) and movements concerned with migration, ethnic diversity and multiculturalism. Analyses will focus on the processes, content and outcomes of social movement advocacy.
SCLG6902 Ethics of Social Research

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SCLG3003 Assessment: 1x1000wd ethics application (20%), 1x500wd equiv oral task (10%), 1x1500wd reflective piece (30%), 1x3000wd research proposal (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to key issues, debates and ethical questions in human research, enabling them to acquire knowledge and develop skills for research degrees and funding applications. It examines values and principles of research ethics, and encourages students to reflect on these in relation to research with human subjects.
SUST5005 Law, Policy and Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Rosemary Lyster Session: Intensive October Classes: Intensive classes for 4 full days in October Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Class presentation and short essay (1,500-2,000 w, 20%) and long essay (6,000 w, 80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study involves essay-writing. Academic writing skills equivalent to HSC Advanced English or significant consultation via the Writing Hub is assumed.
This unit examines how policy-makers engage with and implement policies and legal requirements for regulating ecologically sustainable development. Meeting the needs of a growing global population while at the same time maintaining the health of the environment, which provides the life support system for humanity, is the central policy challenge of the 21st century. Key sustainability challenges include: avoiding dangerous climate change, safeguarding biological diversity, providing food security, coping with resource scarcity, and promoting green technology including low-carbon energy generation. These issues provide acute challenges for governments given that they cut across a range of policy areas, and require long-term planning rather than short-term decision-making. The unit examines how policy-makers at international, national and sub-national scales consider and respond to sustainability issues. Students will be introduced to: the role of analysis (economic, legal, political, scientific and social etc) in providing an evidence base for decisions; the variety of instruments and institutions available for policy delivery; how the lobbying process influences policy determination; and effectiveness of policy design and implementation. The unit also examines how decision-making is influenced by stakeholders, including industry, nongovernmental organisations and citizens. It will be seen that sustainability policy design and implementation in the real world involves reconciling competing agendas and interests, and that trade-offs are often made that may strengthen or weaken the effectiveness of sustainability policies. Offered through the Sydney Law School, this unit introduces students to the legal imperatives (both international and national) which inform and mandate policy choices.
SUST5006 Sustainability: Business and Leadership

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Christopher Wright Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2.5 hour interactive lecture per week with up to four hours per week spent on a combination of additional (e.g. on-line) learning tasks, small group sessions and consultation with lecturers. Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, short written assignments, group project (100%) Practical field work: Experiential learning with sustainable enterprise Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study involves essay-writing. Academic writing skills equivalent to HSC Advanced English or significant consultation via the Writing Hub is assumed.
This unit of study will help build your understanding of the knowledge, skills and activities required to lead sustainability and change in, and with, businesses and organisations. The unit presents the relevance and importance of business mission and strategy, and will introduce the roles of corporate social responsibility, sustainability and change management. It will also explore stakeholders associated with business (including shareholders, consumers and government) and how they can both motivate and impede change in the context of sustainability. Learning will be facilitated through seminars, readings, as well as individual group projects.
WMST6902 Arguing the Point

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd skills exercise (30%), 1x2000wd peer-learning task (30%), 1x2500wd long essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit introduces students to some practices, methods, writing styles and forms of argumentation relevant to research in Gender and Cultural Studies. Through the study of different examples, students are encouraged to develop their own research practices and writing skills. The unit caters to students in the early stages of thesis conception and development. Students who have already begun writing their thesis will be encouraged to experiment with different ways of arguing and writing their research. Students who are just starting will have the opportunity to develop their ideas.