Business School

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Dalyell enrichment units of study

Business School
The Dalyell enrichment units of study are listed below.
CLAW2208
Business Regulation, Risk and Compliance
6    P Completion of at least 24 credit points of study
Semester 1
CLAW2209
Intellectual Property for Business
6    P Completion of at least 24 credit points of study
Semester 1
CLAW2211
Commercial Practice in China
6    P Completion of at least 24 credit points of study
Semester 2
CLAW2212
Franchising
6    P Completion of at least 24 credit points of study
Semester 2
CLAW2213
Legal Regulation of Int'l Business
6    P Completion of at least 24 credit points of study
Semester 2
CLAW3209
The Environment, Law and Business
6      Semester 1
CLAW3210
Banking and Financial Law
6    P completion of at least 48 credit points
N CLAW2204
Semester 1
CLAW3888
Law and Regulation of Fintech
6    P Completion of at least 48 credit points.
Semester 2
IBUS2020
Chinese Economy and Business
6      Semester 1
Semester 2
IBUS2101
International Business Strategy
6      Intensive January
Semester 1
Semester 2
IBUS2104
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
6    P completion of at least 48 credit points
Semester 1
Semester 2
IBUS3104
Ethical International Business Decisions
6    P Completion of at least 48 credit points
Semester 1
Semester 2
IBUS3107
Business Negotiations
6    P Completion of at least 48 credit points


This unit will require student's participation in a number of negotiations. Preparation for these negotiations, which are a large part of your grade, will require time-pressured reading of material in class.
Semester 2
IBUS3108
Social Entrepreneurship
6    P Completion of at least 48 credit points
Semester 1
INFS2010
People, Information and Knowledge
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
Semester 2
INFS2020
Business Process Modelling and Improvement
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
Semester 1
INFS2030
Digital Business Management
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
Semester 1
INFS2040
Project Management Foundations
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
N INFO3402 or ENGG1850
Semester 2
INFS2050
Data Governance and Technology Assurance
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
N INFS3010 or INFS3030
Semester 2
INFS3040
Enterprise Systems and Integrated Business
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
Semester 1
INFS3050
Business Intelligence for Managers
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
Semester 2
INFS3080
Business Information Systems Projects
6    A INFS1000 and INFS2040
P 48 credit points of units
Semester 1
INFS3110
Information Systems for Accountants
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
N INFS2001
Semester 1
Semester 2
QBUS3350
Project Planning and Management
6    A BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or STAT1021 or ((MATH1005 or MATH1015) and MATH1115) or 6 credit points of MATH units which must include MATH1905.
N QBUS2350
Semester 2
WORK2210
Strategic Management
6    P 40 credit points worth of units of study
Semester 1
Semester 2
WORK2218
Managing Organisational Behaviour
6    P 24 Junior credit points
Semester 1
Semester 2
WORK3201
International Human Resource Management
6    A WORK1003
P Completion of at least 48 credit points
N WORK2217


The Intensive June session is restricted to Study Abroad students only. All other students enrol in the Semester 1 session.
Intensive June
Semester 2
WORK3202
Leadership
6    P Completion of at least 48 credit points
N WORK2222
Semester 1
WORK3203
Gender, Diversity and Inclusion at Work
6    P Completion of at least 48 credit points
Semester 1b
WORK3204
Managing Organisational Sustainability
6    A WORK1004 or WORK2201
P Completion of at least 48 credit points
N WORK2219
Semester 1
WORK3205
Organisational Communication
6    A WORK1004 or WORK2201
P Completion of at least 48 credit points
N WORK2221


The Intensive July session of this unit is only available to Study Abroad students. All other students should enrol in the Semester 2 session.
Intensive July
Semester 2
WORK3206
Workplace Law and Regulation
6    A WORK1003
P Completion of at least 48 credit points
N WORK2227
Semester 1
WORK3208
Globalisation, Work and Employment

This unit of study is not available in 2020

6    A WORK1003 and (WORK1004 or WORK2201)
P completion of at least 48 credit points
N WORK2224
Semester 2

Dalyell enrichment units of study

Business School
The Dalyell enrichment units of study are listed below.
CLAW2208 Business Regulation, Risk and Compliance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three hours of classes per week, which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops Prerequisites: Completion of at least 24 credit points of study Assessment: engagement and participation (10%), research assignment (40%), presentation (25%), in-class test (10%), in-class test (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Over recent years there has been a dramatic rise in the volume and reach of regulation in response to a variety of social, environmental and economic issues. Much of this regulation impacts on business, and its management who are, increasingly, personally liable. This unit has been designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of the overall regulatory infrastructure which impacts on all faculty disciplines. Business Regulation, Risk and Compliance addresses self-regulation as an alternative to regulation by law; the regulatory process and the scope for business to influence regulatory initiatives; the alternative regulatory instruments; the executive arm of government - the bureaucracy - and the avenues for challenging administrative decisions; the investigative and enforcement powers of the major regulatory agencies - ACCC, ATO and ASIC; personal and corporate liability for regulatory breach; indemnification; whistleblowing and whistle-blower protection: regulatory compliance with special reference to Australian Standard AS3806-2006 on Compliance Standards and the strategies which facilitate legal action including class actions and litigation funding as well as the major alternatives to litigation including arbitration and alternative dispute resolution with particular emphasis on mediation.
CLAW2209 Intellectual Property for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three hours of classes per week, which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops Prerequisites: Completion of at least 24 credit points of study Assessment: class participation (10%), case study (15%), presentation (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Innovation is a key driver of business. This unit addresses the intellectual property regime - the statutory and common law mechanisms that recognise and protect creative effort and proprietary knowledge and reward innovation. The intellectual property rights available under the law are discussed but the focus is on the commercial implications of the IP regime. This unit covers not only the protection and enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights [IPRs] but also their commercialisation and their management. The unit outlines the key IPRs granted by the statutory IP regimes - trademarks, copyright, designs and patents - as well as the common law protection of confidential information and trade secrets. The protection of trade designations, branding and character merchandising through the statutory misleading or deceptive conduct action is also covered as is the protection of business goodwill through restraint of trade covenants. The ownership of IP, its protection internationally and its commercialisation through licensing and technology transfers are also discussed.
CLAW2211 Commercial Practice in China

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three hours of classes per week, which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 24 credit points of study Assessment: mid-semester test (25%), group presentation (15%), proposal of research paper (10%), research paper (40%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
China is currently the second biggest economy in the world and is Australia's most important trading partner. Australian businesses are increasingly engaging with China. This Unit of Study addresses the frequently asked questions of what underpins commercial practice in China and how to do business with China. It explores China's unique business environment, which has resulted from its culture, history and demography, and examines the business regulations, tax system, and the administrative and compliance issues businesses will face when carrying on business with China. The Unit first outlines the Chinese business environment in terms of culture, history, economics, demography, and government administration. It then provides students with an understanding of the legal environment that businesses will face in China. Through a hypothetical case study, different aspects of commercial practice in China such as contract, entity structure, mergers and acquisition, property and intellectual property rights, the tax system, different tax types and associated international issues, and social insurance are analysed.
CLAW2212 Franchising

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three hours of classes per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops Prerequisites: Completion of at least 24 credit points of study Assessment: engagement and participation (10%), in-class test (10%), in-class test (15%), presentation (25%), research assignment (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Franchising is an increasingly popular business model in Australia and internationally which offers an effective strategy for expanding an existing business or entering an industry. It is rapidly becoming the dominating force in the distribution of goods and services. This unit examines the nature, development and operation of franchising and its growing influence in Australia and overseas. It addresses key legal and commercial issues in establishing, structuring and managing franchise systems as well as legal and commercial issues arising in the course of the continuing business relationship. Particular emphasis is placed on franchising development in the ASEAN countries.
CLAW2213 Legal Regulation of Int'l Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three hours of classes per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops Prerequisites: Completion of at least 24 credit points of study Assessment: presentation (20%), mid-semester exam (40%), research paper (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The global architecture of international trade and business sets the parameters within which countries and businesses interact with each other across borders. All those involved in trade or investment activities that may result in cross border transactions should be aware of the regulatory dimensions of that global system. The system informs trade and investment policy as well as the regulation of particular business transactions. This can lead to new markets or limit certain business activities. It can result in new regulation and laws and provides avenues to resolve disputes between countries and businesses and between businesses and businesses. The international regulatory system has different dimensions. These can be described as the multilateral system; bilateral agreements and trading blocs; conventions governing transactions; international regulatory bodies and self regulatory bodies. This unit will introduce students to aspects of this international system. Students will explore institutions and instruments of the system and how they fit together. There will be opportunities for students to examine how this impacts on regulatory policy and current negotiations.
CLAW3209 The Environment, Law and Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: interactive 3-hour seminars involving lectures, student presentations and critiques, and class discussions. Assessment: participation (15%); research project proposal presentation (20%); critique (10%); individual research project (50%); individual reflection (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The relationship between the natural environment and business practice is deep and complex, and a multiplicity of regulatory initiatives have been employed in an attempt to manage and influence their interaction. This unit of study aims to demystify environmental regulation as far as it is relevant to the running of a business. It begins with an analysis of the contemporary institutional framework surrounding the interaction between business and the environment with particular reference to the historical conditions which have given rise to it, before introducing major stakeholders in the development of environmental and business regulation (including nation states, international organisations and other non-state actors) and their respective roles. The unit then discusses international environmental regulation and situates Australian regulation within it in order to explain its impact on Australian businesses. The effectiveness of different regulatory styles in this area is assessed together with the argument that business can and should take ownership of problematic elements of their interactions with the natural environment. Different strategies developed to 'manage' a business' relationship with the environment and issues surrounding liability for environmental damage are also considered.
CLAW3210 Banking and Financial Law

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: CLAW2204 Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), case study / research (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Banks and financial institutions are central to the stability, efficiency and wealth of modern economies and businesses. This unit focuses on the impact of national and international financial regulation on banking contracts, bank secrecy, money laundering and fraud. Students become familiar with legal risks in commercial and investment banking, by examining the complex relationships and legal duties of the various parties engaged in modern finance. Topics covered include electronic banking, international trade finance and securitisation. The unit assists students to understand how the law is applied in practice through the use of case studies. Special emphasis is placed on how banking disputes may be resolved.
CLAW3888 Law and Regulation of Fintech

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hours x 1 lecture each week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points. Assessment: research paper (30%); in-class assessment (20%); final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Fintech is an essential component of the Third Industrial Revolution, particularly in relation to lowering costs, increasing efficiency and making financial services more accessible. Students are equipped with an understanding of innovation in the financial system, and how these developments interact with current laws and regulations in the global markets. This unit provides students with insights into a wide range of topics, including smart contracts, privacy law and big data, virtual currencies and mobile payments, investor protection and crowd funding, property law and cryptosecurities.
IBUS2020 Chinese Economy and Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture, 1 x 1 hour tutorial. Assessment: research assignment (30%), mid-semester assignment (20%), participation (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an overview of the economic foundations of China's global business expansion and examines the core facets of China's economic and business system, including China's market transition, the role of government, the rural and urban economy, labour markets, the financial system, the knowledge-based economy, international trade and investment and questions of sustainability. The unit is designed for students interested in gaining a basic understanding of modern China business as well as a wide range of challenges in doing business in/with China in today's global environment.
IBUS2101 International Business Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr workshop per week. Assessment: mid-term exam (20%), tutorial participation (10%), consulting project (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aim to understand how multinational enterprises strategize and operate in global competition. Major topics include the International Business Environment (e.g. the differences in economic, political, legal, and cultural environments); International Business Strategy (e.g. International expansion strategy, entry mode choices, cross-border strategic alliances, and mergers and acquisitions); and International Business Management (e.g. design, structure and control of international operations; and foreign subsidiary management). The emphasis of the unit is on the application of contextual knowledge about international business and strategic management theories as tailored to the Asia Pacific, to analyse and make decisions faced by companies operating in the Asia Pacific region.
IBUS2104 Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1.5hr lecture and 1 x 1.5hr tutorial/lab class per week Prerequisites: completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: take home assessment (25%), individual report (20%), mid-semester exam (25%), presentation (15%), business plan (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In order to be a successful entrepreneur, it is necessary to have knowledge of several fundamental business processes. The most effective way to master the critical skills and concepts of entrepreneurship is by developing a pitch and a business plan which simulates, as much as possible, the real world processes of starting a business. In this unit, students learn how to investigate customer needs and markets to generate an innovative idea for a start-up. Students also participate in the realistic simulation of the creation of a start-up from the best student-submitted ideas and develop these ideas into a business model. All students join a team that remains together for the duration of the unit, creating and pitching sections of a business plan as well as drafting the final version. This unit brings together skills acquired across other disciplines of study and requires active participation.
IBUS3104 Ethical International Business Decisions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: Group project (30%), final exam (30%), workshops (20%), and reflective journals (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In order to succeed in international business, both corporations and individuals need broad decision-making abilities. Business decision-making tools yield more coherent and justifiable results when used with an understanding of the ethical, social and environmental aspects of the process. This applies to various situations in the international business setting including business relations with government, customers, employees, and NGOs. This unit is designed to look at these non-financial elements in the decisions made within the international business context. Following the completion of this unit, students will have enhanced skills and knowledge relevant to the understanding of ethical issues and ethical decisions making in international business organizations.
IBUS3107 Business Negotiations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: In-class exercises (50%), written assignment (10%), test (25%), writing a ten page negotiator's handbook (15%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit will require student's participation in a number of negotiations. Preparation for these negotiations, which are a large part of your grade, will require time-pressured reading of material in class.
The purpose of this unit is to build students' understanding of the theory of negotiation as it is practised in a variety of strategic settings. The aim is to build students' confidence with the negotiation process. The unit is relevant to the broad spectrum of negotiation problems that are faced by managers and specific examples from international strategy such as M and A and joint ventures are used. The unit provides participants with an opportunity to develop skills experientially and to understand negotiation in useful analytic frameworks. Considerable emphasis is placed on role-playing exercises and case studies. This unit requires participation in a number of negotiations. Preparation for these negotiations, which are a large part of the final grade, requires time-pressured reading of material in class.
IBUS3108 Social Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr workshop per week. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: individual report (25%), practice and final pitch (25%), final report (25%), reflective piece (15%), workshop engagement and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide students with the opportunity to learn how they can apply their business knowledge and skills to address complex social and environmental problems. Social entrepreneurs are committed to furthering a social mission and rank social, environmental or cultural impact on a par with, or even above, profit. At the intersection of business and not-for-profit organisations, these social entrepreneurs are now visible and having an impact on a global scale. This unit is structured around engaged inquiry-based learning, proving you the opportunity to learn from theory and practice. Topics will include critically reviewing concepts, challenges of growing a social enterprise, frameworks for understanding, sourcing funds from a variety of stakeholders, understanding and reporting social impact, as well as collaboration and leadership.
INFS2010 People, Information and Knowledge

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: group project report (30%); group project presentation (10%); individual assignment (15%); final exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To compete effectively in today's knowledge economy businesses are required to systematically manage their information and knowledge resources. In this unit, you will develop an understanding of the main issues businesses face when they develop and implement knowledge management initiatives. You will be introduced to the tools and systems that enable businesses to acquire, store, distribute, analyse, and leverage information and knowledge resources. By focusing on the theoretical and practical principles that link people, information, and organisations, this unit will help you understand the processes of generating, communicating, and using knowledge in businesses, and the way these can be integrated with business strategy and information technology. Assumed knowledge for this unit is INFS1000 or equivalent.
INFS2020 Business Process Modelling and Improvement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3 hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: individual assignment (25%), group project (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides you with an in-depth understanding of the role of business process management (BPM) and process architectures in a business environment. You will gain essential skills of the entire BPM lifecycle, from process identification to process monitoring, including process modelling, analysis, redesign and automation required to achieve high performing business processes in a service-oriented business environment. In this unit, you will attain considerable hands-on skills with BPM tools, by documenting, analysing, and simulating current and improved processes. Assumed knowledge for this unit is INFS1000 or equivalent.
INFS2030 Digital Business Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: Group Project Report (25%); Group Project Presentation (5%); Mid-Term Exam (20%); Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide you with a detailed overview of the concepts and models used in doing business digitally via the Internet. These concepts and models will enable you to evaluate, synthesise and implement Internet-enabled business models. The unit will provide the critical link between the firm's performance and modern Internet technologies, such as e-Commerce platforms, Social Media and Social Networking. Emphasis will be put on the utilisation of Internet technologies to enable new forms of digital business, rather than on the technologies themselves. Assumed knowledge for this unit is INFS1000 or equivalent.
INFS2040 Project Management Foundations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: INFO3402 or ENGG1850 Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: group assignment (30%), mid-term test (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Projects are a common way of managing organisational transformation and change, the development of new products and the implementation of Information Technology (IT) in business. Information Systems (IS) business analysts will work in projects and need an understanding of both project management and the project environment. This unit will introduce you to the end-to-end project management lifecycle as described in the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). You will learn how to successfully manage projects from initiation through execution to completion. The focus of this unit will be on the management, execution, and coordination of project activities. To this end, you will learn hands-on project management techniques and gain first-hand experience with a modern online project management platform, including an introduction to agile project management methodologies.
INFS2050 Data Governance and Technology Assurance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: INFS3010 or INFS3030 Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: individual assignment (20%), group project (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Data governance is a major imperative for organisations in effectively managing, using, protecting and leveraging their critical data assets. This unit introduces students to key concepts, processes, technologies and stakeholders related to the design and implementation of a data governance program. The unit takes an interdisciplinary and multi-level approach that examines standards, frameworks and methodologies for managing data quality, protecting critical and sensitive information, supporting business analytics and meeting compliance obligations. In examining different stages of the data lifecycle, students also learn about legal, professional and ethical responsibilities, policy implications, required skill sets and accountabilities.
INFS3040 Enterprise Systems and Integrated Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: individual assignment (25%), group project (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an in-depth understanding of the way in which implementation and use of large scale integrated Enterprise Systems change the nature of organisational capabilities, processes, and roles. Students will gain an understanding of the strategic role of Enterprise Systems in providing a platform for improved business operations and designing information infrastructures. In this unit, students will gain considerable hands-on experience with an enterprise-wide system, such as SAP, concentrating on the way in which such systems support integrated business processes. Through a combination of discussion and practical work, students will gain a strong knowledge in both the organisational and technical aspects of Enterprise Systems. Students will also explore the emergence and implications of cloud-based Enterprise Systems and the implementation process. Assumed knowledge for this unit is INFS1000 or equivalent.
INFS3050 Business Intelligence for Managers

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: tutorial work (10%), midsession exam (30%), practical assignment (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To gain or maintain their competitive edge, more than ever before, organisations need to rely on high-quality information to support decision making processes at all organisational levels. Business Intelligence (BI) is now being recognised as one of the top business priorities world-wide. While in the past, the term BI was used to describe a very broad range of software applications, the latest thinking in this field emphasises IS support for human intelligence, in the context of business decision making. In this unit, students learn how BI helps information discovery and how to analyse multidimensional data. Students gain hands-on experience in using a commercial BI platform. These practical skills, combined with in-depth analytical skills enable students to assist any organization (regardless of its size and industry domain) to derive more intelligence from its data, improve its performance and ultimately, compete on analytics. Issues are explored from the business rather than the technology perspective. This unit does not require prior programming experience.
INFS3080 Business Information Systems Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: TBA Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 and INFS2040 Assessment: individual assignment (20%); group project (40%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers advanced topics in project management with an emphasis on contemporary issues in the delivery of complex Information Systems solutions for businesses. The topics include alternative project management methodologies and techniques, the human and organisational aspects of project management, the importance of project governance, the changing nature of project management in the digital era, as well as the evolving role of the project manager in the global business environment.
INFS3110 Information Systems for Accountants

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3-hour workshop per week Prohibitions: INFS2001 Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: individual assessment (20%), group workshop assessment (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit demonstrates how accounting information systems (AIS) can improve business performance relating to the conduct of accounting based transactions. It provides students with the skills necessary to identify and assess opportunities for business improvement, by looking at both conceptual and physical AIS and to understand the varied ways in which the business must assess risks, controls, costs and benefits in relation to the implementation of an AIS. From an end-to-end systems perspective, students gain knowledge of approaches and methodologies related to the design, implementation and operation of an AIS. Through graphic representations, visual thinking can be applied to analyse, assess and improve the conceptual AIS with a view to its physical implementation. Students learn the importance of an integrated approach to managing business cycles including expenditure, conversion and revenue where multiple competing requirements often need to be balanced. Students develop expertise in business analysis, a foundation skill for accountants, auditors, project managers and business analysts.
QBUS3350 Project Planning and Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: QBUS2350 Assumed knowledge: BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or STAT1021 or ((MATH1005 or MATH1015) and MATH1115) or 6 credit points of MATH units which must include MATH1905. Assessment: group project (25%), homework 1 (15%), homework 2 (10%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project management provides organisations with a powerful set of tools to improves their ability to plan, implement, and manage activities to accomplish specific organisational objectives. Project management is more than just a set of tools; it is a results-oriented management style that places a premium on building collaborations among a diverse cast of characteristics. This unit introduces students to the planning and management of projects by focusing on a variety of practical topics including project network, PERT, resource scheduling, learning curves, cost and time management in projects, and the use of project management support systems. It also discusses the organisational, leadership, cultural, technological challenges that project managers might face.
WORK2210 Strategic Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures and 1x 1hr lab time Prerequisites: 40 credit points worth of units of study Assessment: tutorial participation (10%); case simulation (30%); case study report (25%); final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores how strategy is formulated, implemented and evaluated. Strategic management concepts, frameworks and tools are applied to organizational case studies. Current debates in strategic management are evaluated for their relevance to strategists in a range of organizational contexts.
WORK2218 Managing Organisational Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2 hour lecture and 1x 1 hour tutorial hour per week Prerequisites: 24 Junior credit points Assessment: individual assignment (20%); group report (20%); group presentation (20%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to give students the ability to understand how organisations operate. As an introductory organisational behaviour unit, it covers key debates across a range of social science disciplines including business, management, psychology, sociology, and communication studies. Key topics explored include power, control, networks, and organisational culture.
WORK3201 International Human Resource Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive June,Semester 2 Classes: 2x 1 hour lecture and 1x 1.5 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2217 Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 Assessment: quiz (readiness assurance test) - individual (20%); quiz (readiness assurance test) - group (5%); team strategy exercise (20%); written assignment (30%); exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: The Intensive June session is restricted to Study Abroad students only. All other students enrol in the Semester 1 session.
This unit considers the opportunities and challenges associated with managing employees in international and cross-cultural contexts, with specific emphasis on international recruitment, selection, preparation, placement, management development, performance management, reward and remuneration in the international, multi-national and trans-national corporation. Within the context of global labour markets, the unit considers the implications of internationalisation and globalisation for human resource management (HRM), the difference between domestic and international HRM, and the challenges of cross-cultural management. This unit provides students with a theoretical understanding of IHRM and cross-cultural management, as well as a practical understanding of the issues and challenges associated with managing employees in international, global and cross-cultural contexts.
WORK3202 Leadership

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2222 Assessment: group presentation (20%); reflective essay (30%); tutorial participation (10%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Leadership is increasingly seen to be a key factor affecting the performance of contemporary organisations and is an important area of study in the fields of management and organisational behaviour. While leadership principles are often associated with the work of senior management, they also have potential application to all members of organisations, including people at the beginning of their career. This unit explores conventional and alternative perspectives on leadership and provides a range of leadership case studies. Further, this unit of study challenges students to engage in self-reflection on their own leadership values, strengths and areas for development. Finally, this unit helps students to develop their skills in perspective-taking, problem-solving, decision-making and having influence, and to effectively leverage these skills at the outset of their career.
WORK3203 Gender, Diversity and Inclusion at Work

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1b Classes: 1 x 2 hr lecture and 1 x 1 hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: individual assignment (30%); group assignment (30%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The unit explores the strategies and initiatives implemented at the workplace and corporate level to manage a diverse workforce with a particular focus on the impact of gender on individuals' experiences of the world of work. While drawing on the intersecting elements of gender and other diversity dimensions (such as cultural diversity; LGBTIQ+; indigeneity; people with disabilities; age), the unit seeks to introduce students to a number of gender perspectives, highlighting how each perspective conceptualizes the issue of gender; provides a different lens to accounting for gender inequality and proposes different "solutions" to the "problem of gender diversity" in organizations. The unit takes a multi-level and multi-disciplinary approach to examining the management of gender and diversity, focusing on live case studies and practical examples.
WORK3204 Managing Organisational Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1x 1 hour tutorial hour per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2219 Assumed knowledge: WORK1004 or WORK2201 Assessment: tutorial facilitation (15%); tutorial attendance and participation (10%); individual sustainability reflection (15%); sustainability issue and report (25%); final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Managing organisational sustainability is critical for effective, contemporary managers. This unit focuses on how to conceptualise and to practice sustainability in its broadest sense. Topics covered include the ethical aspects of management and organisational practice, corporate social responsibility, governance models in organisations and managing in diverse environments. Students are encouraged to enhance their understanding of the roles and responsibilities of management and the impact of organisations on stakeholders including staff, government and community.
WORK3205 Organisational Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 2 Classes: Semester 2 session: 1x 1hr lecture and 1x 2hr tutorial per week. Intensive July session (Study Abroad students only): 2 x 4hr workshops per week. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2221 Assumed knowledge: WORK1004 or WORK2201 Assessment: tutorial attendance and participation (10%); communication analysis report (30%); team case analysis presentation (20%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: The Intensive July session of this unit is only available to Study Abroad students. All other students should enrol in the Semester 2 session.
Communication is integral to many organisational processes; for instance, effective planning, decision-making, negotiation, conflict management, change management and leadership all rely upon effective communication by organisational actors. At the same time, organisational communication has become more complex due to increasing levels of diversity in the workplace and an increasing reliance on emergent and rapidly changing communication technologies. Drawing on communication research models, theories and case studies, this unit provides students with insight into how to manage the complexities of contemporary organisational communication. The unit focuses primarily on internal organisational communication and examines communication processes at various levels: interpersonal (dyadic), group and organisation.
WORK3206 Workplace Law and Regulation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2227 Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 Assessment: case study (30%), tutorial presentation (20%), tutorial participation (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the regulatory framework that exists around paid work in Australia. It examines the development of employee and employer rights and responsibilities through the employment contract and labour law. It focuses on both individual and collective regulation of work in Australia paying particular attention to the industrial sphere, as well as discrimination and termination of employment. Both the aim and purpose of industrial regulation and the impact of this regulation on workplace relations is analysed.
WORK3208 Globalisation, Work and Employment

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture, 1 x 1 hour tutorial Prerequisites: completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2224 Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 and (WORK1004 or WORK2201) Assessment: short essay (20%); major essay (40%); participation (10%); exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the way in which the internationalisation of economic activities impacts on the nature of employment, jobs and regulation across different countries and regions. It considers how economic development in different countries has contributed to the growth of particular employment arrangements. It focuses in particular on the country specific interplay between economics, politics, and society which has contributed to the development of particular employment regulatory regimes. Further, it maps economic changes on a global scale identifying international economic forces, agents and political arrangements and seeks to highlight pressures and tensions on employment arrangements that result from these global interactions.