Anatomy Histology Descriptions

ANATOMY AND HISTOLOGY

Anatomy and Histology major

A major in Anatomy and Histology requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level units according to the following rules:
(a) 6 credit points of MEDS coded anatomy core units and 6 credit points of ANAT coded selective units or
(b) 12 credit points ANAT coded core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 3000-level core units
(iv) 12 credit points of 3000-level major selective units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary project units

Anatomy and Histology minor

A minor in Anatomy and Histology requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level units according to the following rules:
(a) 6 credit points of MEDS coded anatomy core units and 6 credit points of ANAT coded selective units or
(b) 12 credit points ANAT coded core units
(iii) 12 credit points of 3000-level minor selective units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
BIOL1008 Human Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hong Dao Nguyen Session: Semester 1 Classes: This unit of study will involve between 5-6 hours of face-to-face activities run on the Camperdown campus. These contact hours will comprise 2-3 hours of lectures per week; six 3 hour practical sessions; six 3 hour workshops/tutorials Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: post-module quizzes (10%), Living Data (25%), scientific report (20%), skills test (5%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: Six 3 hour lab classes Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
BIOL1908 Human Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hong Dao Nguyen Session: Semester 1 Classes: This unit of study will involve between 5-6 hours of face-to-face activities run on the Camperdown campus. These contact hours will comprise 2-3 hours of lectures per week; six 3-hour practical sessions; six 3-hour workshops/tutorials Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: post-module quizzes (10%), Living Data (25%), scientific report (20%), skills test (5%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: Six 3 hour practicals Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in alternative components which may for example include guest lecturers from medical science industries. The nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
BIOL1998 Human Biology (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosalyn Gloag Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1908; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1996 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical report (25%), practical presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), pre laboratory quizzes (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences. The practical work syllabus consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
CHEM1011 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, and online year-round, see https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about atomic theory, structure and bonding, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit and Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3hr practical per week for 12 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, presentations, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
MEDS1001 Human Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Philip Poronnik Session: Semester 1 Classes: this unit of study will involve between 5-6 hours of face-to-face activities run on the camperdown campus, these contact hours will comprise lectures; six 3-hour practical sessions; six workshops and tutorials Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1901 Assessment: Written and oral communication, quiz, practical and workshop reports, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the medical sciences suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology and medical sciences. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in the medical sciences.
Textbooks
TBA
MEDS coded units of study are only available to students in the Medical Science stream.

2000-level units of study

ANAT coded core
ANAT2008 Principles of Histology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Samson Dowland and Dr Katie Dixon Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week. Prohibitions: BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01 Assessment: One 1-hour theory exam,one 1-hour practical exam, mid-semester exam, theory and practical quizzes (100%) Practical field work: One 2-hour practical per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Due to the independent nature of this course, it is recommended that students have successfully completed 48 credit points of junior units of study before enrolling in ANAT2008.
This unit of study covers the principles of cell biology and study of the structure of cells, tissues and organ systems at the light and electron microscopic levels. The focus is on human systems.
Histology, also known as microscopic anatomy, is the scientific study of the microscopic structure of organs and tissues in the body. This branch of science involves examining tissues with light and electron microscopes to gather details that are invisible to the naked eye. Students will gain an understanding of the microanatomy of cells, tissues and organs and be able to relate this structure to the function of these systems. This course begins with an introduction to cell biology and moves through a description of the four major tissue types in the body ¿ epithelium, connective tissue, muscle and nervous tissue. Some simple body systems are also introduced and investigated histologically. This unit provides students with practical experience in histology, where they will use microscopes to examine specimens that have been sectioned, stained and mounted on glass slides. Modern practical applications of histology, including molecular and cell biology, and their utility for research are also discussed.
Textbooks
Paulina, W. Histology - A Text and Atlas. 7th Edition, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. 2015.
ANAT2010 Concepts of Neuroanatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen Cullen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 1 x 2hr tutorial Prerequisites: 6 credit points from BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: ANAT2910 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: one 2-hour theory exam, one 45 min practical exam, one mid-semester quiz, three short online quiz-style assignments, one written assignment Practical field work: Tutorials: One 2-hour practical tutorial in 5 sessions during semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function such as memory and language. In essence, the subject covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain. The laboratory practical sessions offer students the special privilege to examine human specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. Tutorial meetings will provide the opportunity to encounter topics in functional anatomy and histology of the brain using photographs, diagrams, models, animations and problem-solving. Topics in identification of central nervous system structure in typical magnetic resonance images will assist in reinforcing the theory of functional anatomy in a format students are likely to encounter in further study, in real-world situations and readings. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying anatomy and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.
Textbooks
Bear, M.F., B.W. Connors, M.A. Paradiso. Neuroscience. Exploring the Brain (4th edition) Wolters Kluwer, 2016. Recommended Atlas: Nolte and Angevine. The human brain in photographs and diagrams. 4th edition Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders, 2013.
ANAT2910 Concepts in Neuroanatomy Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen Cullen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 1 x 2hr tutorial Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: ANAT2010 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: one 2-hour theory exam, one 45 min practical exam, one 1200 word critical scientific review article, one mid-semester quiz, three short online quiz-style assignments Practical field work: 1 x 1 hr practical Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function such as memory and language. In essence, the subject covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain. The laboratory practical sessions offer students the special privilege to examine human specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. Tutorial meetings will provide the opportunity to encounter topics in functional anatomy and histology of the brain using photographs, diagrams, models, animations and problem-solving. Topics in identification of central nervous system structure in typical magnetic resonance images will assist in reinforcing the theory of functional anatomy in a format students are likely to encounter in further study and in real-world situations and readings. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying anatomy and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.
Textbooks
Required text: Bear, M.F., B.W. Connors, M.A. Paradiso. Neuroscience. Exploring the Brain (4th edition) Wolters Kluwer, 2016. Recommended Atlas: Nolte and Angevine. The human brain in photographs and diagrams. 4th edition Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders, 2013.
MEDS coded anatomy core
MEDS2005 Human Anatomy and Histology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michelle Gerke-Duncan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr Lectures/wk, 2x 2hr Practicals/wk. Prerequisites: 6 cp from (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) Prohibitions: ANAT2011 or BMED2402 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 Assumed knowledge: MEDS1X01 Assessment: In Semester Online Post-lecture Quizzes (10%), In Semester Practical Workbook Submissions (10%), In Semester Integrated Assessment Task (10%), End of Semester Anatomy and Histology Practical Exam (25%), End of Semester Anatomy and Histology Theory Exam (45%). Mode of delivery: Block mode
Where exactly is your gall bladder? How do six meters of intestines fit into your body? Are you aware that you have a pineal gland? MEDS2005 is for students who are studying Human Anatomy and Histology in the Medical Sciences stream. Through face-to-face lectures and engaging laboratory practical classes that involve the use of human cadavers and histological slides of human tissues, you will gain fundamental knowledge of the Anatomy and the Histology of the human body including the nervous, endocrine, musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular, urinary, digestive and male and female reproductive systems. Lectures and laboratory practical classes are forums for discussion and debate regarding the structure and function of the human body. Learning will be augmented with online quizzes, self-directed learning opportunities and face-to-face tutorial sessions with additional information offered online to introduce you to a ¿Disease of the Week¿ and to `Broaden your Horizons¿ in relation to the various body systems studied. MEDS2005 starts by teaching the language of Anatomy and Histology and systematically addresses the Anatomy and Histology specific to each body system to prepare you with knowledge and practical skills for many applied anatomical and histological settings. In the hands-on laboratory practical classes, you will work in teams, engaging with the content, building your interpersonal skills, and fostering a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. You will consider the processes of body donation and the ethical, legal and moral frameworks around which people donate their remains for anatomical learning, teaching and research. This Unit of Study teaches the Anatomical and Histological knowledge that is assumed for entry into the Graduate Medical Program at the University of Sydney and that serves as suitable preparation for Graduate Programs in Dentistry, Nursing, Physical therapies, Forensic sciences and other applied para-clinical and clinical fields. Successful completion of this Unit will equip you with a solid foundation in Human Anatomy and Histology to support Post-Graduate careers in the fields of Biomedical Research, Innovation and Development.
ANAT coded selective
ANAT2008 Principles of Histology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Samson Dowland and Dr Katie Dixon Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week. Prohibitions: BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01 Assessment: One 1-hour theory exam,one 1-hour practical exam, mid-semester exam, theory and practical quizzes (100%) Practical field work: One 2-hour practical per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Due to the independent nature of this course, it is recommended that students have successfully completed 48 credit points of junior units of study before enrolling in ANAT2008.
This unit of study covers the principles of cell biology and study of the structure of cells, tissues and organ systems at the light and electron microscopic levels. The focus is on human systems.
Histology, also known as microscopic anatomy, is the scientific study of the microscopic structure of organs and tissues in the body. This branch of science involves examining tissues with light and electron microscopes to gather details that are invisible to the naked eye. Students will gain an understanding of the microanatomy of cells, tissues and organs and be able to relate this structure to the function of these systems. This course begins with an introduction to cell biology and moves through a description of the four major tissue types in the body ¿ epithelium, connective tissue, muscle and nervous tissue. Some simple body systems are also introduced and investigated histologically. This unit provides students with practical experience in histology, where they will use microscopes to examine specimens that have been sectioned, stained and mounted on glass slides. Modern practical applications of histology, including molecular and cell biology, and their utility for research are also discussed.
Textbooks
Paulina, W. Histology - A Text and Atlas. 7th Edition, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. 2015.
ANAT2010 Concepts of Neuroanatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen Cullen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 1 x 2hr tutorial Prerequisites: 6 credit points from BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: ANAT2910 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: one 2-hour theory exam, one 45 min practical exam, one mid-semester quiz, three short online quiz-style assignments, one written assignment Practical field work: Tutorials: One 2-hour practical tutorial in 5 sessions during semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function such as memory and language. In essence, the subject covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain. The laboratory practical sessions offer students the special privilege to examine human specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. Tutorial meetings will provide the opportunity to encounter topics in functional anatomy and histology of the brain using photographs, diagrams, models, animations and problem-solving. Topics in identification of central nervous system structure in typical magnetic resonance images will assist in reinforcing the theory of functional anatomy in a format students are likely to encounter in further study, in real-world situations and readings. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying anatomy and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.
Textbooks
Bear, M.F., B.W. Connors, M.A. Paradiso. Neuroscience. Exploring the Brain (4th edition) Wolters Kluwer, 2016. Recommended Atlas: Nolte and Angevine. The human brain in photographs and diagrams. 4th edition Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders, 2013.
ANAT2910 Concepts in Neuroanatomy Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen Cullen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 1 x 2hr tutorial Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: ANAT2010 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: one 2-hour theory exam, one 45 min practical exam, one 1200 word critical scientific review article, one mid-semester quiz, three short online quiz-style assignments Practical field work: 1 x 1 hr practical Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function such as memory and language. In essence, the subject covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain. The laboratory practical sessions offer students the special privilege to examine human specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. Tutorial meetings will provide the opportunity to encounter topics in functional anatomy and histology of the brain using photographs, diagrams, models, animations and problem-solving. Topics in identification of central nervous system structure in typical magnetic resonance images will assist in reinforcing the theory of functional anatomy in a format students are likely to encounter in further study and in real-world situations and readings. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying anatomy and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.
Textbooks
Required text: Bear, M.F., B.W. Connors, M.A. Paradiso. Neuroscience. Exploring the Brain (4th edition) Wolters Kluwer, 2016. Recommended Atlas: Nolte and Angevine. The human brain in photographs and diagrams. 4th edition Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders, 2013.

3000-level units of study

Major core
ANAT3009 Functional Systems Histology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Lindsay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2h/wk; Practical class 3hr/wk Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)] Prohibitions: HSTO3001 or HSTO3902 or EMHU3001 or EMHU3002 or ANAT3909 Assumed knowledge: ANAT2008 or equivalent. competency with use of light microscope Assessment: Mid-semester exam - 45mins (20%), Final Theory Exam -2hrs (40%), Final Practical Exam -1hr (40%), regular formative discussions and quizzes, Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ANAT3009 provides students with the theoretical knowledge of the histology of the whole body. Hands-on practical training is gained in the operation of a light microscope to examine complex human and animal histological slides. An in-depth understanding is gained about the alimentary, renal, endocrine, and reproductive systems and that knowledge is applied to current trends in research and the clinical field. Students are exposed to current research regarding implantation and placental development and the clinical field by examining IVF treatment. This encourages students to apply their knowledge to various fields and gain a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. The practical sessions ensure students apply lecture content and necessitate group work to complete practical discussion points. Students develop their written and oral communication skills in the language and conventions of the subject through regular discussions. The theoretical and practical skills gained can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as anatomy, histology, and pathology or in post graduate medicine or in areas of research requiring knowledge of advanced histological examination.
ANAT3909 Functional Systems Histology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Lindsay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2h/wk; Practical class 3hr/wk; Project work self-directed during semester Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) Prohibitions: HSTO3001 or HSTO3902 or EMHU3001 or EMHU3002 or ANAT3009 Assumed knowledge: ANAT2008 or equivalent. competency with use of light microscope Assessment: Video presentation and script (,15-20 MCQ and SAQs) - 20%, Final Theory Exam (2 hours) - 40%, Final Practical Exam (1 hour) - 40%, Formative discussion and quizzes (During designated practical sessions) - 0% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ANAT3909 provides students with the theoretical knowledge of the histology of the whole body. Hands-on practical training is gained in the operation of a light microscope to examine complex human and animal histological slides. An in-depth understanding is gained about the alimentary, renal, endocrine, and reproductive systems and that knowledge is applied to current trends in research and the clinical field. Students are exposed to current research regarding implantation and placental development and the clinical field by examining IVF treatment. This encourages students to apply their knowledge to various fields and gain a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. The practical sessions ensure students apply lecture content and necessitate group work to complete practical discussion points. Students develop their written and oral communication skills in the language and conventions of the subject through regular discussions, and video creation. The theoretical and practical skills gainedcan provide a basis for further studies in fields such as anatomy, histology, pathology or in post graduate medicine or in areas of research requiring knowledge of advanced histological examination.
Major selective
ANAT3004 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 2-hour tutorials per week Tutorials: the first tutorial each week includes an introductory talk illustrated by prosections and other anatomical media followed by individual study of relevant prosections, models, X rays. The second tutorial of the week is run on a small group basis and involves viewing and discussion of CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy of the region of the head and neck currently being studied. Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)] Prohibitions: ANAT3904 or ANAT3994 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; [(BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: theory exam - 55%, prac exam - 35%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves. This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections and in medical images especially X Rays and CT scans and to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3904 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, two hour tutorials per week. Tutorials: the first tutorial each week includes an introductory talk illustrated by prosections and other anatomical media followed by individual study of relevant prosections, models, X rays. The second tutorial of the week is run on a small group basis and involves viewing and discussion of CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy of the region of the head and neck currently being studied. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {12cp from rom [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)]} Prohibitions: ANAT3004or ANAT3994 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: theory exam - 50%, prac exam - 30%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10%, advanced report on one of the special topics outlined below - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy plus further studies of medical images, anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and details of development of selected head and neck structures. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The advanced course includes studies of anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and also details of development of selected head and neck structures. Also studies of head and neck anatomy and development using ultrasound.
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves. This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections and in medical images especially X Rays and to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy. Also further studies of anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and of details of development of selected head and neck structures.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Colour Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3994 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, one two hour tutorials per week plus three hours dissection per week Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in (ANAT3007 or ANAT3907) Prohibitions: ANAT3904 or ANAT3004 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) and demonstrated evidence of manual dexterity and ethical approach Assessment: theory exam - 45%, prac exam - 30%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10%, dissection writeups - 5%, report on one of the dissection topics - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, plus 3 hours dissection per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Course is subject to availability of donor material for dissection. Course is by invitation only.
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves. This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections and in medical images especially X Rays and to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. Dissection activities further the understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck and develop highly advanced skills in dissection and prosection of cadaveric materials.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Colour Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3007 Visceral Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 2-hour tutorials per week. The first tutorial each week includes an introductory talk illustrated by prosections and other anatomical media followed by individual study of relevant prosections, models, X rays. The second tutorial of the week is run on a small group basis and involves viewing and discussion of CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy of the region of the trunk currently being studied. Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2910 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2006 or PHSI2906 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or PHSI2008 or PHSI2908 or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or BIOL2021 or BIOL2921 or BIOL2022 or BIOL2922] Prohibitions: ANAT3907 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2005 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 Assessment: theory exam - 55%, prac exam - 35%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the anatomy of the viscera of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Structures covered include the heart and associated great vessels, lungs, mediastinum and the abdominal viscera, the alimentary organs and the genitourinary system. The structure of anterior thoracic and abdominal walls and pelvis along with the nerve supply to the viscera and relevant endocrine structures is also covered. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of structure to function especially with respect to the important functions of breathing, digestion, excretion and reproduction. Students will be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi and Lutjen-drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3907 Visceral Anatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lectures, 2 x 2 hr tutorials Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in [12cp from (ANAT2008 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2910 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2006 or PHSI2906 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or PHSI2008 or PHSI2908 or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or BIOL2021 or BIOL2921 or BIOL2022 or BIOL2922)] Prohibitions: ANAT3007 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2005 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 Assessment: theory exam - 50%, prac exam - 30%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10%, advanced report on one of the special topics listed below - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy plus further studies of medical images, anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and details of development of selected head and neck structures. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the anatomy of the viscera of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Structures covered include the heart and associated great vessels, lungs, mediastinum and the abdominal viscera, the alimentary organs and the genitourinary system. The structure of anterior thoracic and abdominal walls and pelvis along with the nerve supply to the viscera and relevant endocrine structures is also covered. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of structure to function especially with respect to the important functions of breathing, digestion, excretion and reproduction. Students will be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy. Also further studies of anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and of details of development of selected head and neck structures.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi and Lutjen-drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy
ANAT3008 Musculoskeletal Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 2-hour tutorial per week Practical Work: One two hour practical class per week Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI12008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) Prohibitions: ANAT3908 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: One 90 minute paper (70%), one 60 minute paper (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides an opportunity for students to study the topographical and systems anatomy of the upper limb, lower limb and the back regions. Emphasis is placed upon the identification and description of structures and the correlation of structure with function. This includes for the upper limb, its role in manipulation, for the lower limb standing and walking and for the back flexible support and protection. Emphasis is also given to the innervation of the limbs. The unit also aims to develop the general skills of observation, description, drawing, writing and discussion as applying to biological structure.
ANAT3908 Musculoskeletal Anatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures Prerequisites: An average mark of 70 or above from 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2X10 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X06 or PHSI2X07 or PHSI2X08 or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or PSYC2X10 or PSYC2X11 or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or BIOL2X21 or BIOL2X22 or BIOL2X24 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31] or [BMED2401 and BMED2402]} Prohibitions: ANAT3008 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; [(BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: One 90 minute paper(70%), one practical examination (30%) Practical field work: 2 x 2hr Anatomy Wetlab Laboratories Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide an opportunity for students to study the topographical and systems anatomy of the upper limb, lower limb and the back regions. Emphasis is placed upon the identification and description of structures and the correlation of structure with function, which for the upper limb includes its role in manipulation, for the lower limb standing and walking and for the back flexible support and protection. Emphasis is also given to the innervation of the limbs and the consequences of nerve lesions for limb function. The unit also aims to develop the general skills of observation, description, drawing, writing and discussion as applying to biological structure. The unit builds upon or compliments other macroscopic anatomy units offered by the Department and provides for the development of skills, which could be relevant to a later honours project or higher degree in the field of structural biology.
Interdisciplinary Projects
ANAT3888 Anatomy and Histology Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hrs lectures and 3hrs workshop/group work per week Prerequisites: {12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or MEDS2005]} or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Assessment: Assignments and written exam (50%), Project report (20%), Project oral presentation (10%), Team work participation and evaluation (20%). Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Our ever-changing world requires knowledge that extends across multiple disciplines. The ability to identify and explore interdisciplinary links is a crucial skill for emerging professionals and researchers alike. This unit presents the opportunity to bring together the concepts and skills you have learnt in your discipline and apply them to a real-world problem. A broad range of projects where you will use your anatomy skills may be offerred, examples may include working on a project that investigates application of anatomy knowledge in ergonomics or biomechanics, or in education and display of anatomical artifacts. In this unit, you will continue to understand and explore disciplinary knowledge, while also meeting and collaborating with students from across the University through project-based learning; identifying and solving problems, collecting and analysing data and communicating your findings to a diverse audience. All of these skills are highly valued by employers. This unit will foster the ability to work in interdisciplinary teams, and this is essential for both professional and research pathways in the future.
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Pauline Ross Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit consists of one seminar/workshop per week with accompanying online materials and a project to be determined in consultation with the partner organisation and completed as part of a team with academic supervision. Prerequisites: Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major. Assessment: group plan, group presentation, reflective journal, group project Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in at least one 3000-level Science Table A unit of study to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application to the Faculty of Science.
Minor selective
ANAT3004 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 2-hour tutorials per week Tutorials: the first tutorial each week includes an introductory talk illustrated by prosections and other anatomical media followed by individual study of relevant prosections, models, X rays. The second tutorial of the week is run on a small group basis and involves viewing and discussion of CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy of the region of the head and neck currently being studied. Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)] Prohibitions: ANAT3904 or ANAT3994 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; [(BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: theory exam - 55%, prac exam - 35%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves. This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections and in medical images especially X Rays and CT scans and to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3904 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, two hour tutorials per week. Tutorials: the first tutorial each week includes an introductory talk illustrated by prosections and other anatomical media followed by individual study of relevant prosections, models, X rays. The second tutorial of the week is run on a small group basis and involves viewing and discussion of CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy of the region of the head and neck currently being studied. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {12cp from rom [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)]} Prohibitions: ANAT3004or ANAT3994 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: theory exam - 50%, prac exam - 30%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10%, advanced report on one of the special topics outlined below - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy plus further studies of medical images, anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and details of development of selected head and neck structures. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The advanced course includes studies of anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and also details of development of selected head and neck structures. Also studies of head and neck anatomy and development using ultrasound.
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves. This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections and in medical images especially X Rays and to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy. Also further studies of anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and of details of development of selected head and neck structures.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Colour Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3994 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, one two hour tutorials per week plus three hours dissection per week Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in (ANAT3007 or ANAT3907) Prohibitions: ANAT3904 or ANAT3004 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) and demonstrated evidence of manual dexterity and ethical approach Assessment: theory exam - 45%, prac exam - 30%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10%, dissection writeups - 5%, report on one of the dissection topics - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, plus 3 hours dissection per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Course is subject to availability of donor material for dissection. Course is by invitation only.
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves. This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections and in medical images especially X Rays and to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. Dissection activities further the understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck and develop highly advanced skills in dissection and prosection of cadaveric materials.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Colour Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3007 Visceral Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 2-hour tutorials per week. The first tutorial each week includes an introductory talk illustrated by prosections and other anatomical media followed by individual study of relevant prosections, models, X rays. The second tutorial of the week is run on a small group basis and involves viewing and discussion of CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy of the region of the trunk currently being studied. Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2910 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2006 or PHSI2906 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or PHSI2008 or PHSI2908 or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or BIOL2021 or BIOL2921 or BIOL2022 or BIOL2922] Prohibitions: ANAT3907 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2005 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 Assessment: theory exam - 55%, prac exam - 35%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the anatomy of the viscera of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Structures covered include the heart and associated great vessels, lungs, mediastinum and the abdominal viscera, the alimentary organs and the genitourinary system. The structure of anterior thoracic and abdominal walls and pelvis along with the nerve supply to the viscera and relevant endocrine structures is also covered. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of structure to function especially with respect to the important functions of breathing, digestion, excretion and reproduction. Students will be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi and Lutjen-drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3907 Visceral Anatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lectures, 2 x 2 hr tutorials Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in [12cp from (ANAT2008 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2910 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2006 or PHSI2906 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or PHSI2008 or PHSI2908 or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or BIOL2021 or BIOL2921 or BIOL2022 or BIOL2922)] Prohibitions: ANAT3007 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2005 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 Assessment: theory exam - 50%, prac exam - 30%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10%, advanced report on one of the special topics listed below - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy plus further studies of medical images, anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and details of development of selected head and neck structures. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the anatomy of the viscera of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Structures covered include the heart and associated great vessels, lungs, mediastinum and the abdominal viscera, the alimentary organs and the genitourinary system. The structure of anterior thoracic and abdominal walls and pelvis along with the nerve supply to the viscera and relevant endocrine structures is also covered. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of structure to function especially with respect to the important functions of breathing, digestion, excretion and reproduction. Students will be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy. Also further studies of anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and of details of development of selected head and neck structures.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi and Lutjen-drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy
ANAT3008 Musculoskeletal Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 2-hour tutorial per week Practical Work: One two hour practical class per week Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI12008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) Prohibitions: ANAT3908 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: One 90 minute paper (70%), one 60 minute paper (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides an opportunity for students to study the topographical and systems anatomy of the upper limb, lower limb and the back regions. Emphasis is placed upon the identification and description of structures and the correlation of structure with function. This includes for the upper limb, its role in manipulation, for the lower limb standing and walking and for the back flexible support and protection. Emphasis is also given to the innervation of the limbs. The unit also aims to develop the general skills of observation, description, drawing, writing and discussion as applying to biological structure.
ANAT3908 Musculoskeletal Anatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures Prerequisites: An average mark of 70 or above from 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2X10 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X06 or PHSI2X07 or PHSI2X08 or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or PSYC2X10 or PSYC2X11 or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or BIOL2X21 or BIOL2X22 or BIOL2X24 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31] or [BMED2401 and BMED2402]} Prohibitions: ANAT3008 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; [(BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: One 90 minute paper(70%), one practical examination (30%) Practical field work: 2 x 2hr Anatomy Wetlab Laboratories Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide an opportunity for students to study the topographical and systems anatomy of the upper limb, lower limb and the back regions. Emphasis is placed upon the identification and description of structures and the correlation of structure with function, which for the upper limb includes its role in manipulation, for the lower limb standing and walking and for the back flexible support and protection. Emphasis is also given to the innervation of the limbs and the consequences of nerve lesions for limb function. The unit also aims to develop the general skills of observation, description, drawing, writing and discussion as applying to biological structure. The unit builds upon or compliments other macroscopic anatomy units offered by the Department and provides for the development of skills, which could be relevant to a later honours project or higher degree in the field of structural biology.
ANAT3009 Functional Systems Histology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Lindsay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2h/wk; Practical class 3hr/wk Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)] Prohibitions: HSTO3001 or HSTO3902 or EMHU3001 or EMHU3002 or ANAT3909 Assumed knowledge: ANAT2008 or equivalent. competency with use of light microscope Assessment: Mid-semester exam - 45mins (20%), Final Theory Exam -2hrs (40%), Final Practical Exam -1hr (40%), regular formative discussions and quizzes, Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ANAT3009 provides students with the theoretical knowledge of the histology of the whole body. Hands-on practical training is gained in the operation of a light microscope to examine complex human and animal histological slides. An in-depth understanding is gained about the alimentary, renal, endocrine, and reproductive systems and that knowledge is applied to current trends in research and the clinical field. Students are exposed to current research regarding implantation and placental development and the clinical field by examining IVF treatment. This encourages students to apply their knowledge to various fields and gain a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. The practical sessions ensure students apply lecture content and necessitate group work to complete practical discussion points. Students develop their written and oral communication skills in the language and conventions of the subject through regular discussions. The theoretical and practical skills gained can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as anatomy, histology, and pathology or in post graduate medicine or in areas of research requiring knowledge of advanced histological examination.
ANAT3909 Functional Systems Histology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Lindsay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2h/wk; Practical class 3hr/wk; Project work self-directed during semester Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) Prohibitions: HSTO3001 or HSTO3902 or EMHU3001 or EMHU3002 or ANAT3009 Assumed knowledge: ANAT2008 or equivalent. competency with use of light microscope Assessment: Video presentation and script (,15-20 MCQ and SAQs) - 20%, Final Theory Exam (2 hours) - 40%, Final Practical Exam (1 hour) - 40%, Formative discussion and quizzes (During designated practical sessions) - 0% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ANAT3909 provides students with the theoretical knowledge of the histology of the whole body. Hands-on practical training is gained in the operation of a light microscope to examine complex human and animal histological slides. An in-depth understanding is gained about the alimentary, renal, endocrine, and reproductive systems and that knowledge is applied to current trends in research and the clinical field. Students are exposed to current research regarding implantation and placental development and the clinical field by examining IVF treatment. This encourages students to apply their knowledge to various fields and gain a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. The practical sessions ensure students apply lecture content and necessitate group work to complete practical discussion points. Students develop their written and oral communication skills in the language and conventions of the subject through regular discussions, and video creation. The theoretical and practical skills gainedcan provide a basis for further studies in fields such as anatomy, histology, pathology or in post graduate medicine or in areas of research requiring knowledge of advanced histological examination.