Criminology Descriptions

Criminology

Major

A major in Criminology requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level units
(iii) 18 credit points of 3000-level units
(iv) 6 credit points of Interdisciplinary project units

Minor

A minor in Criminology requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level units
(iii) 12 credit points of 3000-level units

1000-level units of study

CRIM1001 Introduction to Crime and Criminology

This unit of study does not have Data Audit Committee approval

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Theory essay (30%), 1x1500wd Methods essay (30%), 1x1500wd Take home exercise (30%), 1x Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit considers key ideas and concepts in criminology, including definitions of crime, criminological theories of crime causation, and the consequences of crime. The unit also examines research methods used in criminology and crime research, including the ethics of conducting criminological research.
CRIM1002 Exploring Criminal Justice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Crime policy evaluation (30%), 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x1500wd Take home exercise (30%), 1x Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines key features and processes of criminal justice institutions, crime justice policy and practice, and addresses contemporary debates about crime in relation to substantive areas, such as gender, race, ethnicity, and youth offending.

2000-level units of study

CRIM2601 Studying Crime and Criminology

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Criminology or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Socio-Legal Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Sociology Assessment: 1x 1000wd Reflective essay (20%), 1x 1500wd Research essay (30%), 1x 2000wd Take home exercise (40%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores definitions of crime, criminological theories of crime causation, and core concepts and research methods in criminology. It examines key features of criminal justice institutions and crime justice policy, and addresses contemporary debates about crime in relation to topics such as gender, race, ethnicity, and youth offending.
CRIM2602 Crime, Punishment and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Criminology or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Social Policy or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Socio-legal Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Sociology Prohibitions: SCLG2634 or SCLG2566 Assessment: 1x 1000wd Reflective Essay (20%), 1x 2000wd Research Essay (40%), 1x 1500wd Take Home Exercise (30%), x Tutorial Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores key features of criminal justice processes and practices, with a critical examination of policing, sentencing, punishment and prison in their historical, social, political and cultural contexts. It considers a range of related concepts and issues, including the expansion of punishment in society and post-release life.
CRIM2603 Current Issues in Criminal Justice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Criminology or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Socio-Legal Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Sociology or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Social Policy Assessment: 1x1000wd Critical analysis (20%), 1x2000wd Research essay (40%), 1x1500wd Take home exercise (30%), 1x Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit considers some of the most recent and topical issues of crime and justice in Australia and elsewhere. It examines these in historical perspective and critically assesses them in the context of both contemporary and longstanding debates over criminal justice in politics, policy and criminological research.
SCLG2623 Sociology of Terror

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Sociology or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Socio-Legal Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Criminology Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x3000wd Essay (60%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the relationship between terrorism and globalisation. Explores themes of massacre, ethnic cleansing, and terrorism in the context of social uncertainty and crises in nation states. Examines the production of victims and the process of cultural symbolisation of the body and the new social and political imaginaries emerging. Examines the uses of victimhood in trying to escape terror and achieve reconciliation. Draws on the work of Scarry, Kristeva, Appadurai, Nordstrom, Foucault, Zulaika and Taussig.

3000-level units of study

CRIM3601 Medico-Legal and Forensic Criminology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Criminology or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Socio-legal Studies Prohibitions: SLSS2603 Assessment: 1x 1000wd equivalent Presentation (20%), 1x 2000wd Research Essay (50%), 1x 1500wd Take Home Exercise (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the relationship between crime, law, medicine and science. It focuses on criminal detection practices, death investigation systems, the coroner's office, autopsies and socio-legal management of the dead body, human tissue and organ controversies, and the role of medicine, science and psychology in criminal justice.
CRIM3602 Crime, Media and Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Criminology or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Socio-legal Studies Prohibitions: SLSS2605 Assessment: 1x 1000wd equivalent Presentation (20%), 1x 2000wd Research essay (50%), 1x 1500wd Take home exercise (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines criminological approaches that explore intersections between criminal justice, law, media forms and cultural dynamics, including in the areas of moral panics, media trials, crime fear, cultural criminology, popular culture, serial killing, female criminality, surveillance, policing protest, organised crime, and terrorism.
SCLG3608 Sociology of Deviance and Difference

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Sociology Prohibitions: SCLG2608 or SCLG2523 or SCLG2004 Assessment: 1x 1500wd Research essay (30%), 1x 2500wd Take-home exercise (40%), x 500wd equivalent Discussion posts (20%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study focuses on social understandings of 'deviance' and 'difference.' Covering various theories, the unit addresses how deviance is constructed and regulated, and how the idea of the 'abnormal' is central to social debate on a wide range of issues, such as obesity, disability, extreme body modification, and mental health.
SLSS3602 Human Rights, Laws and Social Protest

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Socio-Legal Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Criminology Prohibitions: SCLG2624 Assessment: 1x 1500 Minor Essay (30%), 1x 3000 Major Essay (60%), 1x Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Global human rights and the idea of 'one humanity' became politically possible with the end of the Cold War. This unit explores the production of the human rights system as the top down process of legalisation, institutionalisation and intervention and the bottom up process victim claim-making, collective mobilisation and transnational advocacy.

Interdisciplinary Project units of study

Where this major is being completed as a first major towards a degree, students should ensure that the Interdisciplinary Impact unit of study is undertaken.
Where this major is being completed as a second major from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences towards a degree, the Industry and Community Project unit of study is the appropriate unit to select.
CRIM3999 Interdisciplinary Impact

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Completion of at least 90 credit points Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1,Semester 2
Interdisciplinarity is a key skill in fostering agility in life and work. This unit provides learning experiences that build students' skills, knowledge and understanding of the application of their disciplinary background to interdisciplinary contexts. In this unit, students will work in teams and develop interdisciplinarity skills through problem-based learning projects responding to 'real world problems'.
CRIM3998 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September,Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Interdisciplinary Impact in any major Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit is designed for third year students to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way.