Industrial Relations and Human Resources Management Descriptions

Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management

1000-level unit of study

WORK1003 Foundations of Work and Employment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online modules, 1x 1 hour lecture and 1x 1 hour tutorial hour per week Assessment: mid-semester exam (15%); individual assignment (30%); tutorial participation (10%); tutorial leadership (15%); final exam (30%)
This unit draws on concepts from industrial relations and human resource management to examine the interests and strategies of workers, unions, managers, employers and the state. It explores the relationships between these parties as they seek to manage their environments and workplaces and to exercise control over each other. The unit enables students to understand how and why the organisation, regulation and management of work are changing in Australia and globally. As well as providing an introduction to all aspects of the study of the employment relationship, this a foundation unit the industrial relations and human resource management and management majors.
WORK1004 Foundations of Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Prohibitions: WORK2201 Assessment: mid-semester exam (15%); group presentation and facilitation (15%); individual analysis and reflection (20%); tutorial participation (10%); final exam (40%)
This unit draws on concepts from industrial relations and human resource management to examine the interests and strategies of workers, unions, managers, employers and the state. It explores the relationships between these parties as they seek to manage their environments and workplaces and to exercise control over each other. The unit enables students to understand how and why the organisation, regulation and management of work are changing in Australia and globally. As well as providing an introduction to all aspects of the study of the employment relationship, this a foundation unit the industrial relations and human resource management and management majors.

2000-level units of study

WORK2203 IR Policy and Processes

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2 hour lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial hour per week Prerequisites: Completion of 24 credit points of 1000-level units of study including WORK1003 Assessment: class participation (10%), tutorial presentation/facilitation (20%), essay/report (40%), final exam (30%)
The aim of this unit of study is to provide an understanding of the institutions and processes engaged in the regulation of work and labour markets. At times of intense change and debate such as today, it becomes all the more important to develop understandings of industrial relations policy which are intellectually rigorous; that is, which are evidence-based, theoretically-explicit and historically-informed. This unit is framed by these considerations. Particular topics may include: the development of policy; the nature of regulation; state and federal government policies; arguments for change; the influence of lobby groups; employer and union strategy; work-family debates and policies; the working of tribunals and courts; dispute settling procedures; the development of wage determination; the outcomes and implications of policy change.
WORK2205 HR Strategies and Processes

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 2 hour lecture and 1x 1hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of 24 credit points of 1000-level units of study including WORK1003 Assessment: multiple choice exam (10%), tutorial activities (20%), research essay (30%), final exam (40%)
Building on the foundational coverage of Human Resource Management (HRM) issues and concepts provided in WORK1003, this unit provides a more focused understanding of key HRM concepts, processes, strategies and practices. The unit covers the way HR concepts, such as the employee psychological contract, might shape HR strategies and practices and highlights the interplay between the strategic approaches to HR and the practices of HR including talent attraction and selection; talent retention and development; managing performance and rewards; diversity and inclusion strategies, workplace health and well being to name a few. It concludes with an investigation of how the HRM system can be effectively evaluated to capture the long term sustainability of the HR processes and strategies adopted.

3000-level units of study

IBUS3104 Ethical International Business Decisions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: Group project (30%), final exam (30%), workshops (20%), and reflective journals (20%)
In order to succeed in international business, both corporations and individuals need broad decision-making abilities. Business decision-making tools yield more coherent and justifiable results when used with an understanding of the ethical, social and environmental aspects of the process. This applies to various situations in the international business setting including business relations with government, customers, employees, and NGOs. This unit is designed to look at these non-financial elements in the decisions made within the international business context. Following the completion of this unit, students will have enhanced skills and knowledge relevant to the understanding of ethical issues and ethical decisions making in international business organizations.
INFS3050 Business Intelligence for Managers

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: tutorial work (10%), midsession exam (30%), practical assignment (30%), final exam (30%)
To gain or maintain their competitive edge, more than ever before, organisations need to rely on high-quality information to support decision making processes at all organisational levels. Business Intelligence (BI) is now being recognised as one of the top business priorities world-wide. While in the past, the term BI was used to describe a very broad range of software applications, the latest thinking in this field emphasises IS support for human intelligence, in the context of business decision making. In this unit, students learn how BI helps information discovery and how to analyse multidimensional data. Students gain hands-on experience in using a commercial BI platform. These practical skills, combined with in-depth analytical skills enable students to assist any organization (regardless of its size and industry domain) to derive more intelligence from its data, improve its performance and ultimately, compete on analytics. Issues are explored from the business rather than the technology perspective. This unit does not require prior programming experience.
WORK3201 International Human Resource Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive June,Semester 2 Classes: 2x 1 hour lecture and 1x 1.5 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2217 Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 Assessment: quiz (readiness assurance test) - individual (20%); quiz (readiness assurance test) - group (5%); team strategy exercise (20%); written assignment (30%); exam (25%)
Note: The Intensive June session is restricted to Study Abroad students only. All other students enrol in the Semester 1 session.
This unit considers the opportunities and challenges associated with managing employees in international and cross-cultural contexts, with specific emphasis on international recruitment, selection, preparation, placement, management development, performance management, reward and remuneration in the international, multi-national and trans-national corporation. Within the context of global labour markets, the unit considers the implications of internationalisation and globalisation for human resource management (HRM), the difference between domestic and international HRM, and the challenges of cross-cultural management. This unit provides students with a theoretical understanding of IHRM and cross-cultural management, as well as a practical understanding of the issues and challenges associated with managing employees in international, global and cross-cultural contexts.
WORK3203 Gender, Diversity and Inclusion at Work

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1b Classes: 1 x 2 hr lecture and 1 x 1 hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: individual assignment (30%); group assignment (30%); final exam (40%)
The unit explores the strategies and initiatives implemented at the workplace and corporate level to manage a diverse workforce with a particular focus on the impact of gender on individuals' experiences of the world of work. While drawing on the intersecting elements of gender and other diversity dimensions (such as cultural diversity; LGBTIQ+; indigeneity; people with disabilities; age), the unit seeks to introduce students to a number of gender perspectives, highlighting how each perspective conceptualizes the issue of gender; provides a different lens to accounting for gender inequality and proposes different "solutions" to the "problem of gender diversity" in organizations. The unit takes a multi-level and multi-disciplinary approach to examining the management of gender and diversity, focusing on live case studies and practical examples.
WORK3206 Workplace Law and Regulation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2227 Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 Assessment: case study (30%), tutorial presentation (20%), tutorial participation (10%), final exam (40%)
This unit of study examines the regulatory framework that exists around paid work in Australia. It examines the development of employee and employer rights and responsibilities through the employment contract and labour law. It focuses on both individual and collective regulation of work in Australia paying particular attention to the industrial sphere, as well as discrimination and termination of employment. Both the aim and purpose of industrial regulation and the impact of this regulation on workplace relations is analysed.
WORK3400 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3 hrs weekly Prerequisites: 72 credit points Prohibitions: BUSS3110 or ACCT3400 or BANK3400 or CLAW3400 or FINC3400 or IBUS3400 or INFS3400 or MKTG3400 or QBUS3400 or WORK3401 Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 and WORK1004 and (WORK2203 or WORK2205) Assessment: group plan (20%); individual statement (20%); group report (50%); group presentation (10%)
This unit allows students to undertake an interdisciplinary project, working with one of the University's industry and community partners. This experience allows students to address a complex problem set out by the partner by integrating their academic skills and knowledge from more than one discipline. Students also have the opportunity to build their interpersonal and transferable skills required in their professional life.
WORK3600 IR and HRM in Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1a,Semester 2a Classes: 1 hr lecture and 1 day block workshop per week Prerequisites: Students commencing from 2018: completion of at least 120 credit points including WORK1003, WORK1004, WORK2203 and WORK2205. Pre-2018 continuing students: completion of at least 120 credit points including WORK2203 and WORK2205. Prohibitions: WORK2215 Assessment: group assignment (30%); group assignment - in-class case study exercises (0%); individual assignment (30%); final exam (40%)
Note: This unit should only be undertaken by students in their final semester of the IR and HRM major. This unit of study must be completed at the University of Sydney Business School.
This capstone unit bridges the gap between theory and practice in human resource management and employment relations by integrating knowledge and consolidating key skills developed across the major. It aims to provide students with practical experience in identifying, analysing, and solving contemporary business problems. The unit covers critical issues and builds skills in negotiation and influence, managing in a diverse environment, implementing practices to enhance diversity, equality and inclusion and building sustainable organisations. It contextualises this material in relation to the self, the organisation and institutions. Much of this unit is dedicated to a problem-based/experiential approach to learning. Students ensure their career-readiness by demonstrating their ability to apply concepts, theories, frameworks, methodologies, and skills to authentic problems and challenges faced in the field of human resource management and employment relations.