International Business Descriptions

International Business

1000-level units of study

IBUS1101 Global Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2-hr lecture/week, 1 x 1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: group assignment (30%), mid-semester exam (20%), tutorial participation (10%), final exam (40%)
This unit provides the foundational knowledge in international business. The focus is on understanding the strategy of firms in the context of increasing globalization of markets and production. Students gain knowledge about multinational enterprises from the developed and developing economies, theories and frameworks explaining foreign direct investment and trade and country and firm level factors that impact global strategy.
IBUS1102 Cross-Cultural Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: IBUS2102 Assessment: tutorial attendance and participation (10%); quizzes (10%); research project (20%); mid-semester test (20%); final exam (40%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Intensive July
Critical to effective management in international and multicultural business environments is an understanding of cultural differences and how to manage those differences. This unit provides conceptual frameworks and evidence from practice that develops an understanding of the ways in which cultures differ, how these differences can impact management, and how cultural issues can limit organisational effectiveness. Strategies for managing and harnessing cultural differences are also evaluated. The subject matter is explored from an internal perspective as well as from an external perspective, looking at issues within the company as well as issues between the multinational company and its host environment. Major topics include the significance of culture in international management; the meaning and dimensions of culture; comparative international management styles; managing communication across cultures; global business ethics; cross-cultural negotiations; cross-cultural leadership and motivation; culture and consumer behaviour; and managing cross-cultural conflict.

2000-level units of study

CLAW2209 Intellectual Property for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three hours of classes per week, which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops Prerequisites: Completion of at least 24 credit points of study Assessment: class participation (10%), case study (15%), presentation (25%), final exam (50%)
Innovation is a key driver of business. This unit addresses the intellectual property regime - the statutory and common law mechanisms that recognise and protect creative effort and proprietary knowledge and reward innovation. The intellectual property rights available under the law are discussed but the focus is on the commercial implications of the IP regime. This unit covers not only the protection and enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights [IPRs] but also their commercialisation and their management. The unit outlines the key IPRs granted by the statutory IP regimes - trademarks, copyright, designs and patents - as well as the common law protection of confidential information and trade secrets. The protection of trade designations, branding and character merchandising through the statutory misleading or deceptive conduct action is also covered as is the protection of business goodwill through restraint of trade covenants. The ownership of IP, its protection internationally and its commercialisation through licensing and technology transfers are also discussed.
CLAW2211 Commercial Practice in China

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three hours of classes per week, which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 24 credit points of study Assessment: mid-semester test (25%), group presentation (15%), proposal of research paper (10%), research paper (40%), class participation (10%)
China is currently the second biggest economy in the world and is Australia's most important trading partner. Australian businesses are increasingly engaging with China. This Unit of Study addresses the frequently asked questions of what underpins commercial practice in China and how to do business with China. It explores China's unique business environment, which has resulted from its culture, history and demography, and examines the business regulations, tax system, and the administrative and compliance issues businesses will face when carrying on business with China. The Unit first outlines the Chinese business environment in terms of culture, history, economics, demography, and government administration. It then provides students with an understanding of the legal environment that businesses will face in China. Through a hypothetical case study, different aspects of commercial practice in China such as contract, entity structure, mergers and acquisition, property and intellectual property rights, the tax system, different tax types and associated international issues, and social insurance are analysed.
IBUS2020 Chinese Economy and Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture, 1 x 1 hour tutorial. Assessment: research assignment (30%), mid-semester assignment (20%), participation (10%), final exam (40%)
This unit provides an overview of the economic foundations of China's global business expansion and examines the core facets of China's economic and business system, including China's market transition, the role of government, the rural and urban economy, labour markets, the financial system, the knowledge-based economy, international trade and investment and questions of sustainability. The unit is designed for students interested in gaining a basic understanding of modern China business as well as a wide range of challenges in doing business in/with China in today's global environment.
IBUS2101 International Business Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr workshop per week. Assessment: mid-term exam (20%), tutorial participation (10%), consulting project (20%), final exam (50%)
This unit of study aim to understand how multinational enterprises strategize and operate in global competition. Major topics include the International Business Environment (e.g. the differences in economic, political, legal, and cultural environments); International Business Strategy (e.g. International expansion strategy, entry mode choices, cross-border strategic alliances, and mergers and acquisitions); and International Business Management (e.g. design, structure and control of international operations; and foreign subsidiary management). The emphasis of the unit is on the application of contextual knowledge about international business and strategic management theories as tailored to the Asia Pacific, to analyse and make decisions faced by companies operating in the Asia Pacific region.
IBUS2103 International Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr workshop per week Prerequisites: IBUS1102 or IBUS2102 Prohibitions: IBUS3102 Assessment: risk analysis 1 (20%), risk analysis 2 (30%), risk management proposal (20%), final exam (30%)
This unit introduces students to the nature of risk management, particularly the identification and analysis of risk and the consequences for international business actors. Emphasis is placed on surveying some of the environments that can potentially generate risk for global companies, identifying how these risks can impact various aspects of market composition and market participation, and analyzing the impacts of these risks on profitability and firm viability. The business environments surveyed include the international financial system, government and regulation of business activity, compliance risk, corporate social responsibility and activism, as well as issues associated with country and political risk.
IBUS2104 Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1.5hr lecture and 1 x 1.5hr tutorial/lab class per week Prerequisites: completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: take home assessment (25%), individual report (20%), mid-semester exam (25%), presentation (15%), business plan (15%)
In order to be a successful entrepreneur, it is necessary to have knowledge of several fundamental business processes. The most effective way to master the critical skills and concepts of entrepreneurship is by developing a pitch and a business plan which simulates, as much as possible, the real world processes of starting a business. In this unit, students learn how to investigate customer needs and markets to generate an innovative idea for a start-up. Students also participate in the realistic simulation of the creation of a start-up from the best student-submitted ideas and develop these ideas into a business model. All students join a team that remains together for the duration of the unit, creating and pitching sections of a business plan as well as drafting the final version. This unit brings together skills acquired across other disciplines of study and requires active participation.

3000-level units of study

IBUS3101 International Business Alliances

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr workshop per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 36 credit points of 1000-level units Assessment: Mid-term exam (20%), final exam (35%), Alliance presentation (10%), Alliance assignment (20%), tutorial participation (15%)
The formation and implementation of successful global business strategies involves alliances with a range of stakeholders including international customers and suppliers, overseas agents, international franchisors and franchisees, international joint venture partners, and international merger relationships. The aim of this unit of study is to provide conceptual frameworks and evidence from practice that will develop an understanding of the motivations underlying international alliances, the alternative approaches to alliance formulation and development, and the problems involved in promoting effective alliance management. Major topics include the motivations for international business alliances, analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of different types of alliances, factors influencing the choice of alliance arrangements, alliance structure issues, partners selection and relationship management, the reasons why alliances succeed or fail, and the management of alliance processes.
IBUS3104 Ethical International Business Decisions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: Group project (30%), final exam (30%), workshops (20%), and reflective journals (20%)
In order to succeed in international business, both corporations and individuals need broad decision-making abilities. Business decision-making tools yield more coherent and justifiable results when used with an understanding of the ethical, social and environmental aspects of the process. This applies to various situations in the international business setting including business relations with government, customers, employees, and NGOs. This unit is designed to look at these non-financial elements in the decisions made within the international business context. Following the completion of this unit, students will have enhanced skills and knowledge relevant to the understanding of ethical issues and ethical decisions making in international business organizations.
IBUS3106 International Business Special Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January Classes: 2 x 3 hr seminars day pre-departure seminar (Sydney), 30 hrs lectures in country action-research, 1x 3hr seminar post-trip (Sydney) Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: participation and engagement (10%); practice pitch (15%); final pitch (25%); final report (30%); reflective piece (20%)
Note: Students must have received permission to enrol from the Head of the Discipline of Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship.
The special project in International Business provides students with an opportunity to undertake a supervised research project on an approved topic.
IBUS3107 Business Negotiations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: In-class exercises (50%), written assignment (10%), test (25%), writing a ten page negotiator's handbook (15%)
Note: This unit will require student's participation in a number of negotiations. Preparation for these negotiations, which are a large part of your grade, will require time-pressured reading of material in class.
The purpose of this unit is to build students' understanding of the theory of negotiation as it is practised in a variety of strategic settings. The aim is to build students' confidence with the negotiation process. The unit is relevant to the broad spectrum of negotiation problems that are faced by managers and specific examples from international strategy such as M and A and joint ventures are used. The unit provides participants with an opportunity to develop skills experientially and to understand negotiation in useful analytic frameworks. Considerable emphasis is placed on role-playing exercises and case studies. This unit requires participation in a number of negotiations. Preparation for these negotiations, which are a large part of the final grade, requires time-pressured reading of material in class.
IBUS3108 Social Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr workshop per week. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: individual report (25%), practice and final pitch (25%), final report (25%), reflective piece (15%), workshop engagement and participation (10%)
This unit will provide students with the opportunity to learn how they can apply their business knowledge and skills to address complex social and environmental problems. Social entrepreneurs are committed to furthering a social mission and rank social, environmental or cultural impact on a par with, or even above, profit. At the intersection of business and not-for-profit organisations, these social entrepreneurs are now visible and having an impact on a global scale. This unit is structured around engaged inquiry-based learning, proving you the opportunity to learn from theory and practice. Topics will include critically reviewing concepts, challenges of growing a social enterprise, frameworks for understanding, sourcing funds from a variety of stakeholders, understanding and reporting social impact, as well as collaboration and leadership.
IBUS3109 Strategy and Emerging Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 2h lecture (13 wks) + 1x 1hr tutorial (12 weeks) Prerequisites: IBUS2101 Assessment: group project (25%), in-class activity (10%), mid-term exam (15%), final exam (50%)
Emerging economies are rapidly changing the global business landscape as they present tremendous growth opportunities for the developed world. At the same time, their rise as a new competitive force has strategic implications for global managers. This unit focuses on four of the most prominent emerging economies, namely Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC nations), to develop strategic tools to win in the new global competitive environment. Drawing on current insights from International Business Strategy, a two-pronged approach is used to analyse competition in emerging economies: multinational enterprises from developed economies attempting to leverage emerging economies and enterprises from BRIC nations as they transform into multinationals to compete globally.
IBUS3110 Managerial Cognition and Int'l Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2h lecture (13 wks) + 1x 1hr tutorial (12 weeks) Prerequisites: IBUS2101 Assessment: in-class participation and preparedness (15%); group assignment (30%); 2x in-class quizzes (20%); final exam (35%)
This unit of study is structured to equip students with the concepts, tools and techniques to understand managerial cognition and how that can be leveraged to achieve competitive advantage in international business. The unit of study covers attention, heuristic and managerial capital to elaborate the role of managerial cognition in achieving competitive advantage in international business. The unit builds on understanding the concepts of global strategy taught in global business units and provides students an opportunity to advance their knowledge in application of strategic management in international business. The unit uses a variety of learning methods such as case discussion, role play and real life analysis.
IBUS3400 Industry and Community Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3 hrs weekly Prerequisites: 72 credit points Prohibitions: BUSS3110 or ACCT3400 or BANK3400 or CLAW3400 or FINC3400 or INFS3400 or MKTG3400 or QBUS3400 or WORK3400 or WORK3401 Assumed knowledge: IBUS1101 and IBUS1102 and (IBUS2101 or IBUS2103) Assessment: group plan (20%); individual statement (20%); group report (50%); group presentation (10%)
This unit allows students to undertake an interdisciplinary project, working with one of the University's industry and community partners. This experience allows students to address a complex problem set out by the partner by integrating their academic skills and knowledge from more than one discipline. Students also have the opportunity to build their interpersonal and transferable skills required in their professional life.
IBUS3600 International Business in Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: Students commencing from 2018: completion of at least 120 credit points including IBUS1101, IBUS1102, IBUS2101 and IBUS2103). Pre-2018 continuing students: completion of at least 96 credit points including IBUS2101 and (IBUS2102 or IBUS1102) Assessment: individual assignment (30%); group assignment (30%); final exam (40%)
Note: This unit should only be undertaken by students in their final semester of the International Business major. This unit of study must be completed at the University of Sydney Business School.
This unit bridges the gap between theory and practice in international business. The unit covers critical issues and builds skills in the management of business across cultural and national borders. Much of the unit is dedicated to a problem-based/experiential approach to learning, using case studies, simulations, and class activities to deepen and solidify learning.
WORK3201 International Human Resource Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive June,Semester 2 Classes: 2x 1 hour lecture and 1x 1.5 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2217 Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 Assessment: quiz (readiness assurance test) - individual (20%); quiz (readiness assurance test) - group (5%); team strategy exercise (20%); written assignment (30%); exam (25%)
Note: The Intensive June session is restricted to Study Abroad students only. All other students enrol in the Semester 1 session.
This unit considers the opportunities and challenges associated with managing employees in international and cross-cultural contexts, with specific emphasis on international recruitment, selection, preparation, placement, management development, performance management, reward and remuneration in the international, multi-national and trans-national corporation. Within the context of global labour markets, the unit considers the implications of internationalisation and globalisation for human resource management (HRM), the difference between domestic and international HRM, and the challenges of cross-cultural management. This unit provides students with a theoretical understanding of IHRM and cross-cultural management, as well as a practical understanding of the issues and challenges associated with managing employees in international, global and cross-cultural contexts.