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Contributions to student learning recognised

16 September 2016
Five staff awarded citations by The Australian Awards for University Teaching

Five staff have been awarded national citations for their outstanding contributions to student learning. The Australian Awards for University Teaching recognise exceptional teaching practice and enhanced student outcomes.  

Five University staff have been awarded national citations for their outstanding contributions to student learning: 

The Australian Awards for University Teaching, announced this week by Minster for Education and Training Senator Simon Birmingham, are a federal government program that recognise individuals and teams who deliver exceptional teaching practice in their field and enhance student outcomes.  

A photograph of Professor Chris Dickman, School of Life and Environmental Sciences

Professor Chris Dickman, School of Life and Environmental Sciences

Professor Dickman, a specialist in terrestrial ecology, said he was deeply honoured to receive a citation. 

"The opportunity to supervise and mentor large numbers of enthusiastic and outstanding research students has been, and continues to be, one of the proudest and most fulfilling achievements of my career," he said.

“It has been a great privilege for me to be able to provide research students with highly distinctive learning experiences that inform and guide their subsequent careers."

Photograph of Dr Stuart Lane, Sydney Medical School

Dr Stuart Lane, Sydney Medical School

Recognised for his contributions as Chair of the Personal and Professional Development Theme for the Sydney Medical Program, Dr Lane said seeing students feeling free to learn is what gives him the greatest satisfaction.

“One of the best things about teaching is seeing students come to you without knowledge but wanting to learn, then seeing that they’ve acquired that knowledge and it’s going to stay with them," said Dr Lane, who is also a senior lecturer in intensive care medicine.

He praised the Department of Education and Training for recognising the value of teaching, saying that the less quantifiable nature of expert teaching often made it trickier for good teaching to be demonstrated and recognised compared to research.

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education) Professor Pip Pattison congratulated the winners on their success.

“Their work exemplifies the quality of teaching at the University and the importance of keeping the student learning experience top of mind.

“The quality of the winners’ teaching and their ongoing commitment to innovation and ensuring the best experiences for their students means their work will continue to influence student cohorts and contribute to the success of students throughout their careers.”

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