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Strong results continue in QS subject rankings

1 March 2018
35 subjects ranked in top 50 globally
The QS 2018 Subject Rankings, released today, rated two University of Sydney subjects in the top 10 globally and another 33 subjects in the top 50 globally.

The QS 2018 Subject Rankings, released today, rated two University of Sydney subjects in the top 10 globally and another 33 subjects in the top 50 globally.

Sport, which encompasses physical therapy, sports therapy and rehabilitation was ranked second in the world and anatomy tenth.

Subjects ranked in the top 50 included veterinary science (11th), education (12th) and law (14th).  

Domestically the University was ranked number one in Australia for architecture, English language and literature, modern languages, mechanical, aeronautical and manufacturing engineering, sports-related subjects and veterinary sciences.

QS also produces rankings for the five broad ‘faculty areas’ as defined by QS, (not directly equivalent to the faculty structure of the University of Sydney), in which it groups its subjects.

These QS faculty rankings showed overall improvement for the University of Sydney in social sciences and management, engineering and technology, life sciences and medicine.

Dr Michael Spence, Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the University said “Our continuing strong results in the QS rankings is a testament to the quality of our teaching and research across a broad range of disciplines.”

“The University aspires to be the best education and research institution in Australia and among the best in the world as we continue to solve some of the major challenges facing the Australian and international community.”

He pointed to the recent acquisition of a University of Sydney spin-off company producing a revolutionary biomedical technology that allows the body to repair elastic tissues in the skin, artery, bladder and lung.

Other recent international research led by the University of Sydney recommended a slightly longer delay to the clamping of pre-term babies’ umbilical cords – a finding that has the potential to save many tens of thousands of babies lives every year.

Domestically, research indicated that the original implementation of the income management program in the Northern Territory did not improve school attendance or early birthweight outcomes and had negative short-term effects.

“This year’s QS performance also included continuing improvement in our reputation with employers, which follows our graduates being named as Australia’s most employable three years running in the QS graduate employability rankings,” Dr Spence said.

The QS Subject Rankings score universities around the world on their reputation with employers and academics as well as their H-index as an institution (the H-index is a metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of a publication) and citations per research paper.