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University of Sydney signs MoU with criminology leader

4 September 2019
After much ongoing collaboration, the university has formalised a partnership with the Australian Institute of Criminology
The University of Sydney, which has its own criminology research centre, will officially expand its joint operations with the government crime research agency.

A Memorandum of Understanding has been executed between the University of Sydney and government agency the Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC).

Signed by Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) Professor Duncan Ivisonand AIC Director Michael Phelan on 28 August, the memorandum builds on over a year of joint activities.

Dr Garner Clancey, Deputy Director, Sydney Institute of Criminology, noted the extensive ties between the organisations. 

“We have been delighted to collaborate with the Australian Institute of Criminology and see our Memorandum of Understanding with the AIC as an opportunity to really expand our joint activities,” he said.

The university and the AIC have already jointly hosted a number of international visitors, and more are in the pipeline.  The AIC also recently hosted an internship of a PhD student from the university, and two university research groups – from psychology and law – have submitted papers to the AIC Trends and Issues publication series.

There is real potential to apply some novel solutions being developed at Sydney University to crime problems that the AIC is researching
Dr Garner Clancey, USYD

“There is real potential to apply some novel solutions being developed at Sydney University to crime problems that the AIC is researching,” Mr Clancey continued.

Such solutions involve the application of data science, forensic psychology, neuroscience, and accounting to crime prevention and reduction research. 

Professor Ivison said: “This partnership represents an excellent opportunity to transform criminal justice policy and practice. The reciprocal skills exchange will advance the aims of crime reduction and justice promotion.”

Mr Phelan said that the memorandum “demonstrates the commitment between government agencies and universities to undertake, fund and disseminate policy-relevant research of national significance.” 

In addition to research, lectures, conferences and publications have been flagged as opportunities for collaboration. 

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