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Understanding carbon in the air: can we avert a climate catastrophe?

The science and politics of rising atmospheric temperatures
University of Cambridge Professor Herbert Huppert leads this insightful conversation on how global temperatures in the earth's atmosphere has increased over time and what we can do to stop potential calamity.

Event details
Date and time:
Wednesday 17 April, 6 – 7.30pm
Venue: SSB Lecture Theatre 200
Social Sciences Building
The University of Sydney (Camperdown/Darlington campus)
Entry: free and open to all with online registrations essential.

Hear from geophysicist Herbert Huppert as he explores how the earth’s atmospheric temperature is increasing and why it’s a disaster for humans.

In this event, he will explain how carbon dioxide and the methane content of the atmosphere are linked to the average global surface temperature. He will present various predictions into the future and useful ways of restoring balance, such as carbon storage and chemical reaction, as well as how governments around the world have reacted to these ideas and possible solutions.

With climate change being a very real and looming threat, this talk offers insights into the science behind what’s happening and how we can deal with such challenges through individual, collective and political action.

The speaker

Herbert Huppert is Director of the Institute for Theoretical Geophysics at University of Cambridge. He was born and received his early education in Sydney. He graduated in Applied Mathematics from University of Sydney with first class Honours, a University medal and the Baker Travelling Fellowship in 1964.  He then completed a Ph.D. at the University of California, San Diego, and came as an ICI Post-doctoral Fellow to the University of Cambridge in 1968 for what was meant to be a one-year sojourn. He has not yet left! He has published widely using fluid-mechanical principles in applications to the Earth sciences: in meteorology, oceanography and geology.

Event information

This event is free and open to all but online registration is essential.

Simply click the 'Register now' button or follow this link.

Entry to ticket holders will be prioritised and given on a first in, best dressed basis until the room reaches capacity. If an event is full, this may result in standing room or delayed admittance until an appropriate time.

We recommend early arrival to allow time for finding the venue and securing a seat to the event. Doors open 30 minutes before the advertised start time. 

If you could not register but would like to attend, you are welcome to join a stand-by queue on the night as seats may become available due to late cancellations. Please note, this is not guaranteed so you come at risk of non-admittance.

This venue provides wheelchair access, hearing loop and infrared hearing system.

Access requirements

If you have other access requirements or want more information, get in touch with us on 9351 2943 or email sydney.ideas@sydney.edu.au with 'Access | Apr 10 - Bones' in the subject line at the earliest opportunity to allow us time to organise for any additional services in time for the event.

This event takes place at SSB Lecture Theatre 200, which is on Level 2 of the Social Sciences Building (enter via Science Road). 

There will be directional signage on the day leading to the theatre. You may also refer to the map on this page. 

Public Transport

To help you plan your trip, visit: www.transportnsw.info

Train

The venue is roughly 30 minutes walk from Redfern station. Catch a train to Redfern station and take Lawson St up to Abercrombie St. At the roundabout, follow Codrington St up to Butlin Ave. Follow Butlin Ave through to the campus and up Eastern Ave towards the Quadrangle and turn into Science Road. Keep walking along there, venue will be on the right.

Bus

Buses to the University are readily available from Railway Square, Central Station (Broadway). Please use campus maps tool and tick the ‘State transit bus stops’ box under the ‘Amenities’ column to view all possible bus stops.

  • via Parramatta Road: Take one of these buses: 412, 436, 438, 439, 440, 461, 480, 483, m10, L38 or L39 and alight at the Footbridge on Parramatta Road. It's roughly 5 minute walk to venue.
  • via City Road: Take one of these buses: 352, 370, 422, 423, 426, 428, m30, L23 or L28 and alight at the footbridge before Butlin Avenue. Cross the road or go across the bridge and take Eastern Avenue towards the Quadrangle, and turn into Science Road. It's roughly 12 minute walk to venue.

There is some on-street parking around Forest Lodge and Glebe.

There is also paid parking available at Western Avenue Carpark. Head to the University's Parking page for more information about fees and opening hours.

Use the University Campus Maps tool to find out more details about parking and access areas: search for the 'Social Sciences Building'. 

Lead image credit: photo by The Roaming Platypus on Unsplash

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