Mrs Clare Davies

Lecturer in Nursing

M02C - 88 Mallett Street - Building C
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9351 0535

Biographical details

Dr Clare Davies is a Lecturer in Nursing at Sydney Nursing School, a Registered Nurse and Registered Sick Children's Nurse (UK). She has over 25 years’ experience in nursing and has practiced in senior nursing positions in the UK and Australia in the specialty of paediatrics and child health. Most recently she was the Clinical Nurse Consultant for Paediatrics for Northern Sydney Local Health District. She is a Master of Philosophy (Nursing) graduate and a current PhD candidate of Sydney Nursing School. Her PhD thesis is focused on the rights and voice of children in healthcare. She has particular teaching interests in child and adolescent health care, clinical leadership and research.

Research interests

Clare is currently developing a research profile in the area of acute paediatric nursing practice. Her research interests aim to improve the experience of infants, children and adolescents who are admitted to hospital. Her previous research activities have focused on the care of infants with bronchiolitis and, in particular, the nursing assessment of these sick infants. Her current research investigates the rights and voice of children in healthcare, particularly focusing on the experiences of children who have been restrained for medical procedures.

Teaching and supervision

Clare has many years of teaching experience in the clinical and university setting. Her particular areas of teaching interests are child and adolescent health care, clinical leadership, frameworks for professional practice and research and evidence in nursing practice.

Thesis work

Thesis title: The rights of children to express their views and to have them heard in health care: A child-centred qualitative research study

Supervisors: Jennifer FRASER , Donna WATERS

Thesis abstract:

The principle that children are capable of forming their own views, have the right to express these views and are entitled to be listened to was introduced in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) (United Nations Convention on the Right of the Child,1989). The UNCRC, a universally accepted international consensus treaty, is aimed at protecting the human rights of children and promoting their healthy development.
In recent years, the principles of the UNCRC have been applied to the context of children and young people in healthcare. Even short periods of hospitalisation are known to have harmful effects (Rokach & Parvini, 2011) and, in recognition of this, child health advocacy organisations established charters that now directly align with the UNCRC (EACH, 2008; AWCH, 2010). Children’s Hospitals Australasia (CHA) and the Association for the Well-being of Children in Healthcare (AWCH) developed the Charter on the Rights of Children and Young People in Health Services in Australia (Australasia, 2010). This stated that every child or young person has a right to express their views and that healthcare providers have an obligation to respect these views and to create an environment based on trust and the capacity to listen.
Despite increased awareness of children’s rights in healthcare, it appears that the implementation of the principles of the UNCRC may still be limited (Donnelly & Kilkelly, 2011). It is unsurprising that the concept of listening to children’s voices has taken some time to implement. Historically, children’s perspectives have always been disregarded in healthcare settings. This privilege has been afforded, but mostly to the adults caring for them. The imbalance of power in the patient-clinician relationship, and the adult-child relationship, has not enabled children to have a voice (Lloyd, Urquhart, Heard, & Kroese, 2008). Children still struggle to have a voice in matters related to their healthcare and the balance between a child’s voice being heard and their perceived competence is a challenge for the adults, both professionals and parents, who care for them. Family Centred Care (FCC), a model of care that is deeply embedded in paediatric nursing practice, is underpinned by the assumption that children, families and health professionals work in partnership, with each party having an equal voice. However, the focus on parents in the FCC model has resulted in inhibiting the child’s voice (Kelly, Jones, Wilson, & Lewis, 2012). Research attention is now being drawn to the need for investigating ways to listen to the hospitalised child’s voice (Dickinson, Wrapson, & Water, 2014; Livesley & Long, 2013).
Children’s voices are lacking in the literature relating to their health care rights. No Australian research that investigates children’s perspective of expressing their views and having them heard in health care has been located. To date, international literature has focus on the concept of participation in decision-making (Coyne, 2008). Although this is an important element, it is only a part of being able to express ones views and have them heard (Lundy, 2007).
This research project aims to explore children's experiences of expressing their views and having them heard in health care using a child - centred qualitative research approach. It is anticipated that the novel approach of this study will add to the international literature on the child’s voice in healthcare and will be the first Australian study investigating children and young people’s perspectives on their rights to be heard in health care.

Keywords

Adolescent health; Child health; Paediatrics and Child Health

Selected publications

Download citations: PDF RTF Endnote

Book Chapters

  • Fraser, J., Davies, C. (2018). Communicating with children, young people and their families. In Elizabeth Forster, Jennifer Fraser (Eds.), Paediatric Nursing skills for Australian Nurses, (pp. 1-16). New York: Cambridge University Press. [More Information]

Journals

  • Davies, C., Fisher, M. (2018). Understanding research paradigms. Journal of the Australasian Rehabilitation Nurses Association, 21(3), 21-25.
  • Davies, C., Waters, D., Marshall, A. (2017). A systematic review of the psychometric properties of bronchiolitis assessment tools. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 73(2), 286-301. [More Information]
  • Davies, C., Waters, D., Marshall, A. (2017). The nursing assessment of infants with bronchiolitis. Journal of Child Health Care, 21(2), 181-190. [More Information]

2018

  • Fraser, J., Davies, C. (2018). Communicating with children, young people and their families. In Elizabeth Forster, Jennifer Fraser (Eds.), Paediatric Nursing skills for Australian Nurses, (pp. 1-16). New York: Cambridge University Press. [More Information]
  • Davies, C., Fisher, M. (2018). Understanding research paradigms. Journal of the Australasian Rehabilitation Nurses Association, 21(3), 21-25.

2017

  • Davies, C., Waters, D., Marshall, A. (2017). A systematic review of the psychometric properties of bronchiolitis assessment tools. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 73(2), 286-301. [More Information]
  • Davies, C., Waters, D., Marshall, A. (2017). The nursing assessment of infants with bronchiolitis. Journal of Child Health Care, 21(2), 181-190. [More Information]

For support on your academic profile contact .