Leadership to Enable Entrepreneurship Inside Large, Bureaucratic Organizations

Summary

The research team is interested in expressions of interest in participants keen to engage in a work program inside some of the country's most complex private and public sector organizations, including in the banking, media, health, and government sectors. The work involves detailed analysis of performance inside these organizations to (1) understand the drivers of new product development; and (2) advise on future leadership practice and strategy.

Supervisor(s)

Dr Eric Knight

Research Location

University of Sydney Business School - Generic

Program Type

Masters/PHD

Synopsis

For decades, organizations have been built to be efficient: to get existing products to market in a timely and cost-effective way. But in an increasingly global, competitive world, businesses are under increased pressure to get new ideas to market quickly. Balancing efficiency with agility requires trade-off decisions with respect to (1) strategic direction; and (2) allocation of resources. In falls to senior leaders inside businesses and government departments to make the right decisions. This research program studies (1) what the right conditions to support both efficiency and innovation inside large bureaucratic organizations, and (2) how can leaders increase the probability of making the right calls more often.

Additional Information

If you are interested in engaging with the research team, please be in touch. We have a strict selection process to target high quality applications for research in Masters, PhD and post doctoral fellowships.

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Keywords

Entrepreneurship, Management, Agility, Adaptive Capacity, leadership

Opportunity ID

The opportunity ID for this research opportunity is: 1868