Organic and Supramolecular Chemistry

Summary

The synthesis of cyclic peptides and derivatives is currently of significant interest, due to their potential applications in a range of areas spanning both chemistry and biology. Naturally occurring cyclic peptides exhibit a wide range of biological activities and a particular advantage of their cyclic structure is a higher resistance to enzymatic degradation than their linear counterparts. Additionally, the restricted conformational flexibility of cyclic peptides allows them to present functional groups in a spatially well-defined manner and has been of great importance in the study of bioactive protein conformations. This property is also of use in the design of synthetic receptors. Methods to readily synthesise cyclic peptides in high yield will be developed. These will be applied to the synthesis of naturally occurring cyclic peptides as well as to the synthesis of molecular scaffolds for supramolecular chemistry with a focus on the development of molecules capable of selectively recognizing anions of biological importance such as ATP.

Supervisor(s)

Professor Katrina (Kate) Jolliffe

Research Location

School of Chemistry

Program Type

PHD

Synopsis

The synthesis of cyclic peptides and derivatives is currently of significant interest, due to their potential applications in a range of areas spanning both chemistry and biology. Naturally occurring cyclic peptides exhibit a wide range of biological activities and a particular advantage of their cyclic structure is a higher resistance to enzymatic degradation than their linear counterparts. Additionally, the restricted conformational flexibility of cyclic peptides allows them to present functional groups in a spatially well-defined manner and has been of great importance in the study of bioactive protein conformations. This property is also of use in the design of synthetic receptors. Projects are available covering the general areas of organic synthesis (e.g. synthesis of naturally occurring cyclic peptides) and supramolecular chemistry (e.g. design and synthesis of peptide based anion receptors).

Additional Information

Australian students are expected to have a RTP or UPA scholarship. International students will need to apply for a scholarship that covers tuition fees or have appropriate funding from another source.
HDR Inherent Requirements
In addition to the academic requirements set out in the Science Postgraduate Handbook, you may be required to satisfy a number of inherent requirements to complete this degree. Example of inherent requirement may include:

- Confidential disclosure and registration of a disability that may hinder your performance in your degree;
- Confidential disclosure of a pre-existing or current medical condition that may hinder your performance in your degree (e.g. heart disease, pace-maker, significant immune suppression, diabetes, vertigo, etc.);
- Ability to perform independently and/or with minimal supervision;
- Ability to undertake certain physical tasks (e.g. heavy lifting);
- Ability to undertake observatory, sensory and communication tasks;
- Ability to spend time at remote sites (e.g. One Tree Island, Narrabri and Camden);
- Ability to work in confined spaces or at heights;
- Ability to operate heavy machinery (e.g. farming equipment);
- Hold or acquire an Australian driver’s licence;
- Hold a current scuba diving license;
- Hold a current Working with Children Check;
- Meet initial and ongoing immunisation requirements (e.g. Q-Fever, Vaccinia virus, Hepatitis, etc.)

You must consult with your nominated supervisor regarding any identified inherent requirements before completing your application.

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Keywords

organic synthesis, supramolecular chemistry, peptides, anion receptor

Opportunity ID

The opportunity ID for this research opportunity is: 576