About Dr Lina Markauskaite

My key areas of expertise are ICT for education and ICT for educational research.

My main contributions are in the following areas: (a) educational research methods; (b) Information and Communication Technology (ICT) literacy; and (c) cognitive and social engagement with e-learning. My major expertise is in the design of educational research studies and advanced (computer-supported) data analysis techniques. I designed a large-scale study for the assessment of students’ ICT capabilities (~700 principals; ~500 teachers; ~6000 school students). I analysed the impact of various factors on students’ ICT capabilities using PLSpath modelling and developed a methodology for conducting this analysis using complex multilevel clustered data weighting techniques. I was the national coordinator and chief investigator in the well-known IEA (International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement) research studies SITES-1 and SITES-2, in Lithuania. The results of these studies were included in an international database and continue to be used in cross-national comparative studies.

Since moving to Australia in 2004, I have been a solo CI on two research projects. My research has focussed on ICT literacy and e-learning in higher education. My major conceptual work has resulted in the development of an integrated analytical framework for studying ICT literacy and a dynamic model of ICT literacy. My research instruments for studying technical and general cognitive aspects of ICT literacy (Markauskaite, 2007a) have been requested by international scholars. I have been a CI or a PI in several e-learning projects with engineering and education students. I have studied students’ epistemic beliefs, study approaches and e-learning experiences and analysed students’ discourse and engagement in online learning discussions. Among other significant outcomes, I developed new indexes for the analysis of online transcripts that have provided new evidence about students’ cognitive and social engagement with online learning (Markauskaite et al., 2006f, forthcoming3). Recent grants. In 2004, I was awarded a highly competitive Sesqui Postdoctoral Fellowship for a three-year research project: “The use of blended learning environments for enhancing ICT literacy”, at the University of Sydney. My proposed further extension of this research “The influence of “contextual” factors on trainee teachers’ awareness of how ICT can be used in their future profession” was awarded a University of Sydney Research and Development 2006 grant ($20,000). In 2008, I was awarded a Lithuanian Government’s and European Union’s grant for a visiting research fellowship “Education and e-research” ($2,700).   Program committees and referee work. I was a program co-chair and co-editor of proceedings for the ASCILITE’2006 conference and a member of a program committee for the international ALT-2007 conference. Since 2001 I have been a regular reviewer of papers for the international research journal Informatics in Education and have been an invited reviewer for a number of other international journals (Human Technology, Australasian Journal of Information Technologies, Teaching and Teachers Education), books and international conferences. I have supervised several research students and I provide regular advice to others in the Faculty. Impact on policy and practice. I have been a major contributor to research and debate on evidence-based decision-making and strategic planning in ICT implementation in Lithuania. I have conducted a number of theoretical studies on policies and practices for ICT implementation into education. This work resulted in more than ten refereed publications and had a significant impact on Lithuanian policy and curriculum. My empirical and theoretical studies provided a research basis for the development of the first national strategy for the implementation of ICT into Lithuanian secondary education. Expert work. Since 2000, I have been a member and/or a head of several national expert groups for the development of national strategies and other legislation for ICT implementation into general education. During 2003-2004, I represented Lithuania in the ICT Policy Innovation Committee of the European Schoolnet and worked as an independent expert for the evaluation of projects for the European Commission.

My research instruments for studying technical and general cognitive aspects of ICT literacy (Markauskaite, 2007a) have been requested by international scholars. I have been a CI or a PI in several e-learning projects with engineering and education students. I have studied students’ epistemic beliefs, study approaches and e-learning experiences and analysed students’ discourse and engagement in online learning discussions. Among other significant outcomes, I developed new indexes for the analysis of online transcripts that have provided new evidence about students’ cognitive and social engagement with online learning (Markauskaite et al., 2006f, forthcoming3). If you are interested in doing PhD in this domain and want to explore research topics being undertaken at CoCo http://coco.edfac.usyd.edu.au/ , visit CoCo Research http://coco.edfac.usyd.edu.au/Research  and Research students’ http://coco.edfac.usyd.edu.au/About/Research_Profiles pages.
CoCo also hosts Master of the Learning Science and Technology (MLS&T) program http://www.edsw.usyd.edu.au/future_students/postgraduate/MLST/. MLS&T (Research stream) provides an excellent pathway to MPhil and PhD programs for those who do not meet eligibility criteria or want to learn more about the learning science theories and research methods before starting to do an independent research.