Evolution Journal Club

The MEEP lab runs the Evolution Journal Club, where we discuss recent papers on molecular evolution, molecular ecology, phylogenetics, systematics, and macroevolution. Researchers and students interested in evolutionary biology are welcome to attend.

Meetings are normally held on the first Tuesday of each month during term. We meet at 4 pm in the Forest Lodge Hotel on Arundel St, Forest Lodge.

The journal club provides opportunities for meeting researchers interested in evolution, to discuss current topics, and to share and exchange expert knowledge. We particularly encourage research students to participate in the journal club.


Meetings

4 June 2019
Paper tbd.

7 May 2019
Disease mortality in domesticated animals is predicted by host evolutionary relationships
Farrell & Davies (2019) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 116: 7911–7915.

2 April 2019
The genomic basis of Red Queen dynamics during rapid reciprocal host–pathogen coevolution
Papkou et al. (2019) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 116: 923–928.

5 November 2018
Aging human populations: Good for us, good for the earth
Götmark et al. (2018) Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 33: 851–862.

9 October 2018
Macroevolutionary shift in the size of amphibian genomes and the role of life history and climate
Liedtke et al. (2018) Nature Ecology and Evolution, 2: 1792–1799.

4 September 2018
Integrated genomic and fossil evidence illuminates life's early evolution and eukaryote origin
Betts et al. (2018) Nature Ecology and Evolution, 2: 1556–1562.

7 August 2018
Biological species in the viral world
Bobay & Ochman (2018) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 115: 6040–6045.

1 May 2018
Deep mitochondrial origin outside the sampled alphaproteobacteria
Martijn et al. (2018) Nature, 557: 101–105.

3 April 2018
Natural selection and the predictability of evolution in Timema stick insects
Nosil et al. (2018) Science, 359: 765–770.

6 March 2018
Finding evolutionary processes hidden in cryptic species
Struck et al. (2018) Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 33: 153–163.


Past meetings