SCHOOL OF HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE SYDNEY CENTRE FOR THE FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENCE

2018 RESEARCH SEMINARS

The HPS Research Seminar Series runs on selected Mondays during Semester time.

All Welcome. No Booking Required. Free

Please note NEW START TIME: 5:30

CCANESA MEETING ROOM, MADSEN BUILDING
CAMPERDOWN CAMPUS

Best access to CCANESA is from the Eastern Avenue entrance of the Madsen Building. When you enter you will be on the 3rd floor. Please proceed across the foyer and take the stairs on the right up one floor. The door to CCANESA will be straight ahead on this landing



Research Seminar Series - Semester One 2018.
Date e Speaker Topic

MONDAY

5TH MARCH

6PM - 8PM

NICHOLSON MUSEUM

Professor Alan Chalmers

Professor Rachel Ankeny

Dr Daniela Helbig

HPS PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE, A CELEBRATION

Recently HPS was promoted from a Unit to School. This is a welcome change that supports and recognises the achievements of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Sydney from 1945 to now and into the future. We have three speakers that will address the past, present and future of HPS and to recognise the outstanding success of the seminal text " What is this thing Called Science?" Alan Chalmers.

12TH MARCH

CCANESA MEETING ROOM

Wendy Kline

Dema G. Seelye Chair in the History of Medicine

Purdue University

 
Psyschedelic Birth: Bodies, Boundaries, and Consciousness in the 1970s "

9th MARCH

CCANESA MEETING ROOM

MADSEN BUILDING

Anika Fiebich

  Philosopher of Mind and Action 

University of Milan  

 

A Three-Dimensional Approach to Cooperation:Implications for Social Cognition

26th March

CCANESA

ADAM HOCHMAN

DEPT PHILOSOPHY

MACQUARIE UNIVERSITY

Is ‘Race’ Modern? Disambiguating the Question

 

MONDAY 16TH APRIL  CCANESA MEETING ROOM MADSEN BUILDING

BIRGIT LANG

UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE

  "Normality, agency, and the public: the human case study in sexology and psychoanalysis”

23RD APRIL  

CCANESA MEETING ROOM

MADSEN BUILDING

 DR JOHN FORGE

Moral Responsibility Gaps and Autonomous Weapons Systems

As far as we know there are as yet no autonomous weapons systems in existence, but one can guess what they might do: think of what a drone does. Autonomous weapons would give technologically advanced countries, like the US, even greater advantages over less advanced countries, and of course over insurgents, and so it seems likely that these systems will be developed. This will be in spite of appeals not to do so. One such appeal has it that using autonomous weapons will leave ‘responsibility gaps’: if they kill innocents (or even if they only kill those they are supposed to kill) no one will be responsible. The point here is that at least some countries, again like the US, claim to abide by the norms of war – jus in bello, the Law of Armed Conflict, and so on – which means among other things that they (claim to) take responsibility for what they do in war. In this talk I want to consider whether there are, or would be, responsibility gaps if autonomous weapons were developed and used, or whether we could asign responsibility – perhaps to the operator or the designer of the weapons. I will also have something to say about how such systems seems to imply a revision of our ideas about autonomy.

 


 7th MAY  CCANESA

NEIL LEVY

DEPT PHILOSOPHY

MACQUARIE UNIVERSITY


"Scaffolded Morality"

 FRIDAY

8th JUNE

1pm to 6pm

 NEW LAW ANNEXE SEMINAR ROOM 340
 

 HPS RESEARCH PRESENTATION

 1-5pm Current Research HPS Postgrads and Honours Students

3PM AFTERNOON TEA

5pm: KEYNOTE: Rob Wilson, Ph.D., FRSC
Professor of Philosophy
La Trobe University, Melbourne

Disciplining Eugenics: History, Philosophy, and HPS

Eugenics has usually been studied as a historical phenomenon, perhaps one with lessons for present and future uses of science and technology.  Here I want to raise some questions about the relationship of eugenics to both history and philosophy, drawing my experience working in constructing oral histories with survivors of Canadian eugenics over the past 10 years.  This will allow us to discuss received views of eugenics, the enthusiasm for aspects of eugenics in the philosophical bioethics community, and some topics in the philosophy of disability.