Dr Ayesha Tulloch

Research Fellow
School of Life and Environmental Sciences

A08 - Heydon-Laurence Building
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9114 2199

Website Room 319A, A08 - Heydon-Laurence Building

Biographical details

Ayesha is an Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Fellow in the School of Life and Environmental Sciences (SOLES) with a specialisation in using ecological knowledge to inform conservation decision-making processes. She is interested in finding solutions to conservation and wildlife management problems related to ecological monitoring, dynamic processes such as fire and invasive species, ecosystem restoration and collapse, conservation conflicts, spatial conservation planning and triage. She works with non-government conservation organisations, private industries and government agencies concerned with managing our environment in Australia, Africa, New Zealand, U.S.A. and the U.K., to develop solutions for learning about the influence of threatening processes and associated effectiveness of species and ecosystem management, accounting for societal pressures, and prioritising investment in conservation actions to maximise our chance of living sustainably with our environment.

Ayesha began her career in Australia working with the National Parks and Wildlife Service in Royal National Park, New South Wales, to measure the response of small mammals including the threatened eastern pygmy possum to the devastating bushfires of 2001. She spent several years working as a zookeeper then as a landscape restoration project manager for the non-government organisation Greening Australia.

Ayesha returned to academia in 2009 to complete a PhD with Prof Hugh Possingham and Dr Kerrie Wilson at the University of Queensland's School of Biological Sciences. Her PhD research focused on solving conservation monitoring investment problems in landscapes with multiple stakeholders and threats to wildlife. She devised a decision support tool based on cost-effectiveness for land managers to prioritise selection of indicator species to monitor management actions and environmental change, and developed new approaches for evaluating the effectiveness of citizen science monitoring programs.

After completing her PhD, Ayesha stayed at the UQ School of Biological Sciences as a research fellow with the National Environmental Research Program (NERP), exploring ways to account for uncertainty and risk in conservation planning and monitoring decisions. In 2013 Ayesha joined Dr Jonathan Rhodes at the UQ School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management to deliver a NERP project in collaboration with the Australian Department of the Environment, the South Australian Government, and Dr Ascelin Gordon at RMIT University, investigating cumulative impacts of cumulative threatening processes on species in the arid zone of South Australia. During this project she developed a new framework for strategic assessment of infrastructure development scenarios on threatened species.

In September 2014 Ayesha moved to the Fenner School at the Australian National University to take up a research fellowship with Prof David Lindenmayer in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions. She worked on understanding variability in species responses to threat management actions to inform better conservation decisions.

In 2017 Ayesha held a joint position between the Wildlife Conservation Society and the University of Queensland on land use planning to protect human livelihoods and biodiversity in the central Africa and Madagascar. This project integrates mapping of anthropogenic processes such as timber harvesting and bushmeat hunting with priorities for carbon storage, human subsistence and biodiversity conservation, and forecasts likely scenarios of declines in biodiversity under future scenarios of human land use. A key component of this work was delivering training workshops in conservation planning and decision-making tools, work that she continues in her current position at the University of Sydney.

Ayesha commenced her ARC DECRA project entitled ““Forecasting ecosystem collapse and recovery by tracking networks of species”” at SOLES in October 2017. This research explores how to track change in ecosystems made up of complex interacting species and communities, collaborating closely with Professors Christopher Dickman and Glenda Wardle at the University of Sydney.

Research interests

To complement the overview section above, this is your opportunity to provide more detail about your research interests and activities.

Ayesha’s research focuses primarily on monitoring and management of terrestrial environments both in Australia and overseas. Her interests have broadened from an initial focus on optimal monitoring of indicator species to inform management, to measuring change due to environmental disturbance or management at an ecosystem level. One of her primary research goals is to better predict and evaluate the effectiveness of ecosystem management when there are multiple interacting threats and species- ecological and threat interactions often result in perverse outcomes as there is no single best management strategy and trade-off decisions mean that some species benefit whilst others lose under alternative management choices. Specific management actions of interest include changing fire regimes, introduced herbivore grazing and habitat restoration, and managing invasive predators such as cats and foxes.

Optimal monitoring for conservation

Monitoring is crucial for understanding change and informing decisions yet is rarely done well if at all. Ayesha’s research has provided an efficient, repeatable approach for managers and scientists to choose what to monitor, which enables well-informed ecosystem assessments and allows for effective feedback for action on declining ecosystems through tracking networks of species or other biophysical variables over time (Tulloch et al. 2011, 2013). She has ongoing interests in decision-making processes and tools for monitoring, ranging from using Value-of-Information analysis to

Developing clear, repeatable ecosystem metrics to report on environmental change and inform management choices

Accurately tracking and predicting change in ecosystem condition is critical for making good management decisions. Ayesha is particularly interested in research in human-modified landscapes such as those subject to altered fire regimes, logging and agricultural transformation. Critical research questions that remain unanswered and stall management decisions include: (a) how far do current ecosystems diverge from their “natural” state of fire frequency? and (b) how do patch-level ecological disturbance processes such as fire and their associated management actions alter whole-of-ecosystem condition? Ayesha and her co-authors at the University of Queensland have developed a number of metrics for assessing the condition of landscapes with respect to disturbance history (fire and logging), and for evaluating ecosystem vulnerability to extinction based on the size and configuration of remaining small remnant habitat patches.

Dynamics in ecosystem networks across space and time

Using globally important examples drawn from management of biological invasions and fire disturbance, Ayesha discovered dynamics in bird species co-occurrence networks recovering from natural processes (fire) and ecosystem management (habitat restoration) (Tulloch et al. 2016 Ecography). She used this knowledge to demonstrate how surrogate sets can be selected and tailored to suit a range of decision-making contexts for tracking change in dynamic systems. She is currently investigating the link between ecosystem function and species associations, including exploring the role of co-occurrence networks in providing information on ecosystem recovery or collapse.

Advancing and improving the usefulness of citizen science

Citizen science efforts worldwide offer a unique opportunity for researchers to harness volunteer-collected data to understand system change. Ayesha’s PhD research showed how to use citizen science data from bird surveys for decision-making (Tulloch et al. 2013, 2014), and demonstrated how to better allocate scarce environmental monitoring resources in landscapes where citizen scientists spread their effort unevenly. She works closely with BirdLife Australia and eBird and supports research that aims to maximise the benefits of citizen science for informing conservation decisions.

Teaching and supervision

Ayesha has supervised 13 Honours, PhD and Masters projects on topics in terrestrial ecology and conservation decision-making. Her students work on a broad range of questions including: indicator monitoring, prioritising cost-effective management actions for restoring threatened species and ecosystems, and evaluating the impacts of multiple anthropogenic threatening processes such as agricultural transformation and invasive species on mammal, reptile and bird communities.

Her current interests are in assessing the functional importance of vegetation and animal communities in heavily cleared landscapes, investigating whole-of-community impacts of threatening processes, and developing better ways of predicting the effects of management actions- information that is crucial for assessing and choosing the best strategy for managing threatened landscapes.

Current Teaching:

Environmental Monitoring: ENSC2001 (University of Sydney)

Conservation Planning: Development, coordination and delivery of courses in spatial land use planning and conservation decision-support tools (Zonation and Marxan) for industry (private sector, non-government organisations and government agencies), including delivery of courses in Australia, Barcelona, Cambodia, Tanzania, Madagascar and Rwanda (in collaboration with the Wildlife Conservation Society).

Current projects

2017-2020:Forecasting ecosystem collapse and recovery by tracking networks of species (ARC DECRA Project)

Efforts to prevent ecosystem collapse are failing. A focus on managing individual species ignores the fact that ecosystems function because species have complex associations with one another and the environment. The project proposes a new way to assess and predict ecosystem declines and recovery by measuring change in networks of interacting species. Using co-occurrence analysis and network theory, symptoms of declining and recovering ecosystems will be discovered to find robust metrics that diagnose change in communities through understanding networks of co-occurring species. Multi-year multi-site bird monitoring will be conducted between 2017 and 2020 to derive bird community abundance and composition in different ecosystems, and data collected through on-ground vegetation surveys at bird monitoring sites and remote-sensing to evaluate ecosystem condition over time. Co-occurrence networks of birds, reptiles and mammals across gidgee, spinifex and eucalypt woodlands in the Simpson Desert will be constructed and analysed for key attributes that reflect community change and, in turn, ecosystem change due to altered environmental conditions or threatening processes throughout the landscape.

2018-2020: Rapid assessment and prediction of condition in threatened ecological communities to inform conservation resource allocation decisions (NSW Office of Environment and Heritage Save Our Species Project).

I have a PhD top-up available for an exciting project where the student will work with the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, co-supervised by Prof David Keith (UNSW), Prof Glenda Wardle (USyd) and myself. The project would suit a student interested in conservation decision-making, fire ecology, threatened ecological communities (TECs) and IUCN Red Listing of Ecosystems. The goals of the project are to use novel assessment tools to evaluate the ecological condition of TECs in relation to benchmark reference states of disturbance from fire, and to investigate how to use nformation on TEC condition to prioritise management options to preserve or recover TECs.
Please contact me (ayesha.tulloch@sydney.edu.au) for more details.

Associations

  • 2018 – ongoing: BirdLife Australia National Threatened Species Committee.
  • 2017 – ongoing: BirdLife Australia National Steering Committee for Monitoring.
  • 2016 – ongoing: Steering Committee, National Environmental Science Programme (NESP) Threatened Species Hub Project 3.1 “A Threatened Species Index for Australia” (project co-lead) and Project 6.5 “Engaging citizen scientists in conservation”.
  • 2015 – ongoing: Associate Editor, Journal of Applied Ecology.
  • 2014 – ongoing: Project Advisory Committee for the BirdLife Australia project “State of Australia’s Birds: Development of an Australian Bird Index (ABI)”.
  • 2013 – 2017: Eremaea-eBird Website Committee (Managing Editor 2013-2015).
  • 2013 – 2016: Birdlife Southern Queensland Board Member.
  • 2011 – 2013: Advisory Panel for the Wentworth Group of Concerned Scientists Regional Environmental Accounts Trials.

In the media

Using Limited Data to Predict How Communities Will Respond to Management Actions

https://spark.adobe.com/page/A8jHplr5Ujku9/

https://natureecoevocommunity.nature.com/users/79076-ayesha-tulloch/posts/30119-how-to-avoid-perverse-outcomes-of-threat-management-to-recover-communities-of-declining-species

https://phys.org/news/2018-02-limited-species-loss.html

http://www.arc.gov.au/new-use-limited-data-helps-prevent-species-loss

Assessing Ecosystem Health and Conservation Status

https://theconversation.com/unique-australian-wildlife-risks-vanishing-as-ecosystems-suffer-death-by-a-thousand-cuts-52499

Making Better Threat Management Decisions

https://www.iol.co.za/dailynews/opinion/saving-wildlife-in-war-zones-2043367

Monitoring and Citizen Science

https://www.rrr.org.au/whats-going-on/news/dr-ayesha-tulloch-from-the-arc-ceed-chats-with-einstein-a-go-go/

http://decision-point.com.au/article/citizen-science-and-conservation/?lang=de

http://www.futurity.org/science-needs-help-from-citizens-who-bird/

Selected grants

2018

  • Rapid assessment and prediction of condition in threatened ecological communities to inform conservation resource allocation decisions; Tulloch A; Office of Environment and Heritage (NSW)/Saving our Species (SoS) Program.

2017

  • Forecasting ecosystem collapse and recovery by tracking networks of species; Tulloch A; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA).

Selected publications

Download citations: PDF RTF Endnote

Book Chapters

  • Lindenmayer, D., Pierson, J., Barton, P., Lane, P., Tulloch, A., Westgate, M. (2015). A diversity of approaches to ecological surrogates and key knowledge gaps. In D. Lindenmayer, P. Barton, J. Pierson (Eds.), Indicators and Surrogates of Biodiversity and Environmental Change, (pp. 189-194). Australia: CSIRO Publishing.
  • Tulloch, A. (2015). Using decision theory to select indicators for managing threats to biodiversity. In D. Lindenmayer, P. Barton, J. Pierson (Eds.), Indicators and Surrogates of Biodiversity and Environmental Change, (pp. 45-57). Australia: CSIRO Publishing.

Journals

  • Tulloch, A., Auerbach, N., Avery-Gomm, S., Bayraktarov, E., Butterfield, N., Dickman, C., Ehmke, G., Fisher, D., Grantham, H., Holden, M., Wardle, G., et al (2018). A decision tree for assessing the risks and benefits of publishing biodiversity data. Nature Ecology and Evolution, 2(8), 1209-1217. [More Information]
  • Crowther, M., Tulloch, A., Letnic, M., Greenville, A., Dickman, C. (2018). Interactions between wildfire and drought drive population responses of mammals in coastal woodlands. Journal of Mammalogy, 99(2), 416-427. [More Information]
  • Pettorelli, N., Schulte to Buhne, H., Tulloch, A., Dubois, G., Macinnis-Ng, C., Queiros, A., Keith, D., Wegmann, M., Schrodt, F., et al (2018). Satellite remote sensing of ecosystem functions: opportunities, challenges and way forward. Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation, 4(2), 71-93. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Chades, I., Lindenmayer, D. (2018). Species co-occurrence analysis predicts management outcomes for multiple threats. Nature Ecology and Evolution, 2(3), 465-474. [More Information]
  • Kay, G., Tulloch, A., Barton, P., Cunningham, S., Driscoll, D., Lindenmayer, D. (2018). Species co-occurrence networks show reptile community reorganization under agricultural transformation. Ecography, 41(1), 113-125. [More Information]
  • Watson, J., Evans, T., Venter, O., Williams, B., Tulloch, A., Stewart, C., Thompson, I., Ray, J., Murray, K., et al (2018). The exceptional value of intact forest ecosystems. Nature Ecology and Evolution, 2, 599-610. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., McDonald, J., Cosier, P., Sbrocchi, C., Stein, J., Lindenmayer, D., Possingham, H. (2018). Using ideal distributions of the time since habitat was disturbed to build metrics for evaluating landscape condition. Ecological Applications, 28(3), 1-12. [More Information]
  • Villasenor, N., Tulloch, A., Driscoll, D., Gibbons, P., Lindenmayer, D. (2017). Compact development minimizes the impacts of urban growth on native mammals. Journal of Applied Ecology, 54(3), 794-804. [More Information]
  • Kay, G., Mortelliti, A., Tulloch, A., Barton, P., Florance, D., Cunningham, S., Lindenmayer, D. (2017). Effects of past and present livestock grazing on herpetofauna in a landscape-scale experiment. Conservation Biology, 31(2), 446-458. [More Information]
  • Westgate, M., Tulloch, A., Barton, P., Pierson, J., Lindenmayer, D. (2017). Optimal taxonomic groups for biodiversity assessment: a meta-analytic approach. Ecography, 40(4), 539-548. [More Information]
  • Runge, C., Tulloch, A., Gordon, A., Rhodes, J. (2017). Quantifying the conservation gains from shared access to linear infrastructure. Conservation Biology, 31(6), 1428-1438. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Nicol, S., Bunnefeld, N. (2017). Quantifying the expected value of uncertain management choices for over-abundant Greylag Geese. Biological Conservation, 214, 147-155. [More Information]
  • Webb, M., Terauds, A., Tulloch, A., Bell, P., Stojanovic, D., Heinsohn, R. (2017). The importance of incorporating functional habitats into conservation planning for highly mobile species in dynamic systems. Conservation Biology, 31(5), 1018-1028. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, V., Klein, C., Jupiter, S., Tulloch, A., Roelfsema, C., Possingham, H. (2017). Trade-offs between data resolution, accuracy, and cost when choosing information to plan reserves for coral reef ecosystems. Journal of Environmental Management, 188, 108-119. [More Information]
  • Karimi, A., Tulloch, A., Brown, G., Hockings, M. (2017). Understanding the effects of different social data on selecting priority conservation areas. Conservation Biology, 31(6), 1439-1449. [More Information]
  • Evans, M., Tulloch, A., Law, E., Raiter, K., Possingham, H., Wilson, K. (2016). Better planning outcomes requires clear consideration of costs, condition and conservation benefits, and access to the best available data: Reply to Gosper et al., 2016. Biological Conservation, 200, 242-243. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Sutcliffe, P., Naujokaitis-Lewis, I., Tingley, R., Brotons, L., Ferraz, K., Possingham, H., Guisan, A., Rhodes, J. (2016). Conservation planners tend to ignore improved accuracy of modelled species distributions to focus on multiple threats and ecological processes. Biological Conservation, 199, 157-171. [More Information]
  • Kubasiewicz, L., Bunnefeld, N., Tulloch, A., Quine, C., Park, K. (2016). Diversionary feeding: an effective management strategy for conservation conflict? Biodiversity and Conservation, 25(1), 1-22. [More Information]
  • Lindenmayer, D., Candy, S., MacGregor, C., Banks, S., Westgate, M., Ikin, K., Pierson, J., Tulloch, A., Barton, P. (2016). Do temporal changes in vegetation structure additional to time since fire predict changes in bird occurrence? Ecological Applications, 26(7), 2267-2279. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Chades, I., Dujardin, Y., Westgate, M., Lane, P., Lindenmayer, D. (2016). Dynamic species co-occurrence networks require dynamic biodiversity surrogates. Ecography, 39(12), 1185-1196. [More Information]
  • Ikin, K., Tulloch, A., Gibbons, P., Ansell, D., Seddon, J., Lindenmayer, D. (2016). Evaluating complementary networks of restoration plantings for landscape-scale occurrence of temporally dynamic species. Conservation Biology, 30(5), 1027-1037. [More Information]
  • Di Fonzo, M., Possingham, H., Probert, W., Bennett, J., Joseph, L., Tulloch, A., O'Connor, S., Densem, J., Maloney, R. (2016). Evaluating Trade-Offs between Target Persistence Levels and Numbers of Species Conserved. Conservation Letters, 9(1), 51-57. [More Information]
  • Hammill, E., Tulloch, A., Possingham, H., Strange, N., Wilson, K. (2016). Factoring attitudes towards armed conflict risk into selection of protected areas for conservation. Nature Communications, 7, 1-9. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Pichancourt, J., Gosper, C., Sanders, A., Chades, I. (2016). Fire management strategies to maintain species population processes in a fragmented landscape of fire-interval extremes. Ecological Applications, 26(7), 2175-2189. [More Information]
  • Runge, C., Tulloch, A., Possingham, H., Tulloch, V., Fuller, R. (2016). Incorporating dynamic distributions into spatial prioritization. Diversity and Distributions, 22(3), 332-343. [More Information]
  • Runge, C., Tulloch, A. (2016). Solving problems of conservation inadequacy for nomadic birds. Australian Zoologist, 39(2), 280-295. [More Information]
  • Mortelliti, A., Ikin, K., Tulloch, A., Cunningham, R., Stein, J., Michael, D., Lindenmayer, D. (2016). Surviving with a resident despot: Do revegetated patches act as refuges from the effects of the noisy miner (Manorina melanocephala) in a highly fragmented landscape? Diversity and Distributions, 22(7), 770-782. [More Information]
  • Hunter, M., Westgate, M., Barton, P., Calhoun, A., Pierson, J., Tulloch, A., Beger, M., Branquinho, C., Caro, T., et al (2016). Two roles for ecological surrogacy: Indicator surrogates and management surrogates. Ecological Indicators, 63, 121-125. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Barnes, M., Ringma, J., Fuller, R., Watson, J. (2016). Understanding the importance of small patches of habitat for conservation. Journal of Applied Ecology, 53(2), 418-429. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Mortelliti, A., Kay, G., Florance, D., Lindenmayer, D. (2016). Using empirical models of species colonization under multiple threatening processes to identify complementary threat-mitigation strategies. Conservation Biology, 30(4), 867-882. [More Information]
  • Bode, M., Tulloch, A., Mills, M., Venter, O., Ando, A. (2015). A conservation planning approach to mitigate the impacts of leakage from protected area networks. Conservation Biology, 29(3), 765-774. [More Information]
  • Lindenmayer, D., Pierson, J., Barton, P., Beger, M., Branquinho, C., Calhoun, A., Caro, T., Greig, H., Tulloch, A., et al (2015). A new framework for selecting environmental surrogates. Science of the Total Environment, 538, 1029-1038. [More Information]
  • Evans, M., Tulloch, A., Law, E., Raiter, K., Possingham, H., Wilson, K. (2015). Clear consideration of costs, condition and conservation benefits yields better planning outcomes. Biological Conservation, 191, 716-727. [More Information]
  • Kark, S., Tulloch, A., Gordon, A., Mazor, T., Bunnefeld, N., Levin, N. (2015). Cross-boundary collaboration: Key to the conservation puzzle. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 12, 12-24. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Maloney, R., Joseph, L., Bennett, J., Di Fonzo, M., Probert, W., O'Connor, S., Densem, J., Possingham, H. (2015). Effect of risk aversion on prioritizing conservation projects. Conservation Biology, 29(2), 513-524. [More Information]
  • Auerbach, N., Wilson, K., Tulloch, A., Rhodes, J., Hanson, J., Possingham, H. (2015). Effects of threat management interactions on conservation priorities. Conservation Biology, 29(6), 1626-1635. [More Information]
  • Runge, C., Tulloch, A., Hammill, E., Possingham, H., Fuller, R. (2015). Geographic range size and extinction risk assessment in nomadic species. Conservation Biology, 29(3), 865-876. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, V., Tulloch, A., Visconti, P., Halpern, B., Watson, J., Evans, M., Auerbach, N., Barnes, M., Beger, M., Chades, I., et al (2015). Why do We map threats? Linking threat mapping with actions to make better conservation decisions. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 13(2), 91-99. [More Information]
  • Bennett, J., Elliott, G., Mellish, B., Joseph, L., Tulloch, A., Probert, W., Di Fonzo, M., Monks, J., Possingham, H., Maloney, R. (2014). Balancing phylogenetic diversity and species numbers in conservation prioritization, using a case study of threatened species in New Zealand. Biological Conservation, 174, 47-54. [More Information]
  • Auerbach, N., Tulloch, A., Possingham, H. (2014). Informed actions: Where to cost effectively manage multiple threats to species to maximize return on investment. Ecological Applications, 24(6), 1357-1373. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Tulloch, V., Evans, M., Mills, M. (2014). The Value of Using Feasibility Models in Systematic Conservation Planning to Predict Landholder Management Uptake. Conservation Biology, 28(6), 1462-1473. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Chades, I., Possingham, H. (2013). Accounting for complementarity to maximize monitoring power for species management. Conservation Biology, 27(5), 988-999. [More Information]
  • Levin, N., Tulloch, A., Gordon, A., Mazor, T., Bunnefeld, N., Kark, S. (2013). Incorporating socioeconomic and political drivers of international collaboration into marine conservation planning. BioScience, 63(7), 547-563. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, V., Possingham, H., Jupiter, S., Roelfsema, C., Tulloch, A., Klein, C. (2013). Incorporating uncertainty associated with habitat data in marine reserve design. Biological Conservation, 162, 41-51. [More Information]
  • Guisan, A., Tingley, R., Baumgartner, J., Naujokaitis-Lewis, I., Sutcliffe, P., Tulloch, A., Regan, T., Brotons, L., McDonald-Madden, E., Mantyka-Pringle, C., et al (2013). Predicting species distributions for conservation decisions. Ecology Letters, 16(12), 1424-1435. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Possingham, H., Joseph, L., Szabo, J., Martin, T. (2013). Realising the full potential of citizen science monitoring programs. Biological Conservation, 165, 128-138. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Mustin, K., Possingham, H., Szabo, J., Wilson, K. (2013). To boldly go where no volunteer has gone before: Predicting volunteer activity to prioritize surveys at the landscape scale. Diversity and Distributions, 19(4), 465-480. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Szabo, J. (2012). A behavioural ecology approach to understand volunteer surveying for citizen science datasets. Emu, 112(4), 313-325. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Possingham, H., Wilson, K. (2011). Wise selection of an indicator for monitoring the success of management actions. Biological Conservation, 144(1), 141-154. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Dickman, C. (2007). Effects of food and fire on the demography of a nectar-feeding marsupial: A field experiment. Journal of Zoology, 273(4), 382-388. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Dickman, C. (2006). Floristic and structural components of habitat use by the eastern pygmy-possum (Cercartetus nanus) in burnt and unburnt habitats. Wildlife Research, 33(8), 627-637. [More Information]

Conferences

  • Chades, I., Tarnopolskaya, T., Dunstall, S., Rhodes, J., Tulloch, A. (2015). A comparison of adaptive management and real options approaches for environmental decisions under uncertainty. 21st International Congress on Modelling and Simulation, MODSIM2015, Gold Coast: Modelling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand Inc (MSSANZ).

2018

  • Tulloch, A., Auerbach, N., Avery-Gomm, S., Bayraktarov, E., Butterfield, N., Dickman, C., Ehmke, G., Fisher, D., Grantham, H., Holden, M., Wardle, G., et al (2018). A decision tree for assessing the risks and benefits of publishing biodiversity data. Nature Ecology and Evolution, 2(8), 1209-1217. [More Information]
  • Crowther, M., Tulloch, A., Letnic, M., Greenville, A., Dickman, C. (2018). Interactions between wildfire and drought drive population responses of mammals in coastal woodlands. Journal of Mammalogy, 99(2), 416-427. [More Information]
  • Pettorelli, N., Schulte to Buhne, H., Tulloch, A., Dubois, G., Macinnis-Ng, C., Queiros, A., Keith, D., Wegmann, M., Schrodt, F., et al (2018). Satellite remote sensing of ecosystem functions: opportunities, challenges and way forward. Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation, 4(2), 71-93. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Chades, I., Lindenmayer, D. (2018). Species co-occurrence analysis predicts management outcomes for multiple threats. Nature Ecology and Evolution, 2(3), 465-474. [More Information]
  • Kay, G., Tulloch, A., Barton, P., Cunningham, S., Driscoll, D., Lindenmayer, D. (2018). Species co-occurrence networks show reptile community reorganization under agricultural transformation. Ecography, 41(1), 113-125. [More Information]
  • Watson, J., Evans, T., Venter, O., Williams, B., Tulloch, A., Stewart, C., Thompson, I., Ray, J., Murray, K., et al (2018). The exceptional value of intact forest ecosystems. Nature Ecology and Evolution, 2, 599-610. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., McDonald, J., Cosier, P., Sbrocchi, C., Stein, J., Lindenmayer, D., Possingham, H. (2018). Using ideal distributions of the time since habitat was disturbed to build metrics for evaluating landscape condition. Ecological Applications, 28(3), 1-12. [More Information]

2017

  • Villasenor, N., Tulloch, A., Driscoll, D., Gibbons, P., Lindenmayer, D. (2017). Compact development minimizes the impacts of urban growth on native mammals. Journal of Applied Ecology, 54(3), 794-804. [More Information]
  • Kay, G., Mortelliti, A., Tulloch, A., Barton, P., Florance, D., Cunningham, S., Lindenmayer, D. (2017). Effects of past and present livestock grazing on herpetofauna in a landscape-scale experiment. Conservation Biology, 31(2), 446-458. [More Information]
  • Westgate, M., Tulloch, A., Barton, P., Pierson, J., Lindenmayer, D. (2017). Optimal taxonomic groups for biodiversity assessment: a meta-analytic approach. Ecography, 40(4), 539-548. [More Information]
  • Runge, C., Tulloch, A., Gordon, A., Rhodes, J. (2017). Quantifying the conservation gains from shared access to linear infrastructure. Conservation Biology, 31(6), 1428-1438. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Nicol, S., Bunnefeld, N. (2017). Quantifying the expected value of uncertain management choices for over-abundant Greylag Geese. Biological Conservation, 214, 147-155. [More Information]
  • Webb, M., Terauds, A., Tulloch, A., Bell, P., Stojanovic, D., Heinsohn, R. (2017). The importance of incorporating functional habitats into conservation planning for highly mobile species in dynamic systems. Conservation Biology, 31(5), 1018-1028. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, V., Klein, C., Jupiter, S., Tulloch, A., Roelfsema, C., Possingham, H. (2017). Trade-offs between data resolution, accuracy, and cost when choosing information to plan reserves for coral reef ecosystems. Journal of Environmental Management, 188, 108-119. [More Information]
  • Karimi, A., Tulloch, A., Brown, G., Hockings, M. (2017). Understanding the effects of different social data on selecting priority conservation areas. Conservation Biology, 31(6), 1439-1449. [More Information]

2016

  • Evans, M., Tulloch, A., Law, E., Raiter, K., Possingham, H., Wilson, K. (2016). Better planning outcomes requires clear consideration of costs, condition and conservation benefits, and access to the best available data: Reply to Gosper et al., 2016. Biological Conservation, 200, 242-243. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Sutcliffe, P., Naujokaitis-Lewis, I., Tingley, R., Brotons, L., Ferraz, K., Possingham, H., Guisan, A., Rhodes, J. (2016). Conservation planners tend to ignore improved accuracy of modelled species distributions to focus on multiple threats and ecological processes. Biological Conservation, 199, 157-171. [More Information]
  • Kubasiewicz, L., Bunnefeld, N., Tulloch, A., Quine, C., Park, K. (2016). Diversionary feeding: an effective management strategy for conservation conflict? Biodiversity and Conservation, 25(1), 1-22. [More Information]
  • Lindenmayer, D., Candy, S., MacGregor, C., Banks, S., Westgate, M., Ikin, K., Pierson, J., Tulloch, A., Barton, P. (2016). Do temporal changes in vegetation structure additional to time since fire predict changes in bird occurrence? Ecological Applications, 26(7), 2267-2279. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Chades, I., Dujardin, Y., Westgate, M., Lane, P., Lindenmayer, D. (2016). Dynamic species co-occurrence networks require dynamic biodiversity surrogates. Ecography, 39(12), 1185-1196. [More Information]
  • Ikin, K., Tulloch, A., Gibbons, P., Ansell, D., Seddon, J., Lindenmayer, D. (2016). Evaluating complementary networks of restoration plantings for landscape-scale occurrence of temporally dynamic species. Conservation Biology, 30(5), 1027-1037. [More Information]
  • Di Fonzo, M., Possingham, H., Probert, W., Bennett, J., Joseph, L., Tulloch, A., O'Connor, S., Densem, J., Maloney, R. (2016). Evaluating Trade-Offs between Target Persistence Levels and Numbers of Species Conserved. Conservation Letters, 9(1), 51-57. [More Information]
  • Hammill, E., Tulloch, A., Possingham, H., Strange, N., Wilson, K. (2016). Factoring attitudes towards armed conflict risk into selection of protected areas for conservation. Nature Communications, 7, 1-9. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Pichancourt, J., Gosper, C., Sanders, A., Chades, I. (2016). Fire management strategies to maintain species population processes in a fragmented landscape of fire-interval extremes. Ecological Applications, 26(7), 2175-2189. [More Information]
  • Runge, C., Tulloch, A., Possingham, H., Tulloch, V., Fuller, R. (2016). Incorporating dynamic distributions into spatial prioritization. Diversity and Distributions, 22(3), 332-343. [More Information]
  • Runge, C., Tulloch, A. (2016). Solving problems of conservation inadequacy for nomadic birds. Australian Zoologist, 39(2), 280-295. [More Information]
  • Mortelliti, A., Ikin, K., Tulloch, A., Cunningham, R., Stein, J., Michael, D., Lindenmayer, D. (2016). Surviving with a resident despot: Do revegetated patches act as refuges from the effects of the noisy miner (Manorina melanocephala) in a highly fragmented landscape? Diversity and Distributions, 22(7), 770-782. [More Information]
  • Hunter, M., Westgate, M., Barton, P., Calhoun, A., Pierson, J., Tulloch, A., Beger, M., Branquinho, C., Caro, T., et al (2016). Two roles for ecological surrogacy: Indicator surrogates and management surrogates. Ecological Indicators, 63, 121-125. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Barnes, M., Ringma, J., Fuller, R., Watson, J. (2016). Understanding the importance of small patches of habitat for conservation. Journal of Applied Ecology, 53(2), 418-429. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Mortelliti, A., Kay, G., Florance, D., Lindenmayer, D. (2016). Using empirical models of species colonization under multiple threatening processes to identify complementary threat-mitigation strategies. Conservation Biology, 30(4), 867-882. [More Information]

2015

  • Chades, I., Tarnopolskaya, T., Dunstall, S., Rhodes, J., Tulloch, A. (2015). A comparison of adaptive management and real options approaches for environmental decisions under uncertainty. 21st International Congress on Modelling and Simulation, MODSIM2015, Gold Coast: Modelling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand Inc (MSSANZ).
  • Bode, M., Tulloch, A., Mills, M., Venter, O., Ando, A. (2015). A conservation planning approach to mitigate the impacts of leakage from protected area networks. Conservation Biology, 29(3), 765-774. [More Information]
  • Lindenmayer, D., Pierson, J., Barton, P., Lane, P., Tulloch, A., Westgate, M. (2015). A diversity of approaches to ecological surrogates and key knowledge gaps. In D. Lindenmayer, P. Barton, J. Pierson (Eds.), Indicators and Surrogates of Biodiversity and Environmental Change, (pp. 189-194). Australia: CSIRO Publishing.
  • Lindenmayer, D., Pierson, J., Barton, P., Beger, M., Branquinho, C., Calhoun, A., Caro, T., Greig, H., Tulloch, A., et al (2015). A new framework for selecting environmental surrogates. Science of the Total Environment, 538, 1029-1038. [More Information]
  • Evans, M., Tulloch, A., Law, E., Raiter, K., Possingham, H., Wilson, K. (2015). Clear consideration of costs, condition and conservation benefits yields better planning outcomes. Biological Conservation, 191, 716-727. [More Information]
  • Kark, S., Tulloch, A., Gordon, A., Mazor, T., Bunnefeld, N., Levin, N. (2015). Cross-boundary collaboration: Key to the conservation puzzle. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 12, 12-24. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Maloney, R., Joseph, L., Bennett, J., Di Fonzo, M., Probert, W., O'Connor, S., Densem, J., Possingham, H. (2015). Effect of risk aversion on prioritizing conservation projects. Conservation Biology, 29(2), 513-524. [More Information]
  • Auerbach, N., Wilson, K., Tulloch, A., Rhodes, J., Hanson, J., Possingham, H. (2015). Effects of threat management interactions on conservation priorities. Conservation Biology, 29(6), 1626-1635. [More Information]
  • Runge, C., Tulloch, A., Hammill, E., Possingham, H., Fuller, R. (2015). Geographic range size and extinction risk assessment in nomadic species. Conservation Biology, 29(3), 865-876. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A. (2015). Using decision theory to select indicators for managing threats to biodiversity. In D. Lindenmayer, P. Barton, J. Pierson (Eds.), Indicators and Surrogates of Biodiversity and Environmental Change, (pp. 45-57). Australia: CSIRO Publishing.
  • Tulloch, V., Tulloch, A., Visconti, P., Halpern, B., Watson, J., Evans, M., Auerbach, N., Barnes, M., Beger, M., Chades, I., et al (2015). Why do We map threats? Linking threat mapping with actions to make better conservation decisions. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 13(2), 91-99. [More Information]

2014

  • Bennett, J., Elliott, G., Mellish, B., Joseph, L., Tulloch, A., Probert, W., Di Fonzo, M., Monks, J., Possingham, H., Maloney, R. (2014). Balancing phylogenetic diversity and species numbers in conservation prioritization, using a case study of threatened species in New Zealand. Biological Conservation, 174, 47-54. [More Information]
  • Auerbach, N., Tulloch, A., Possingham, H. (2014). Informed actions: Where to cost effectively manage multiple threats to species to maximize return on investment. Ecological Applications, 24(6), 1357-1373. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Tulloch, V., Evans, M., Mills, M. (2014). The Value of Using Feasibility Models in Systematic Conservation Planning to Predict Landholder Management Uptake. Conservation Biology, 28(6), 1462-1473. [More Information]

2013

  • Tulloch, A., Chades, I., Possingham, H. (2013). Accounting for complementarity to maximize monitoring power for species management. Conservation Biology, 27(5), 988-999. [More Information]
  • Levin, N., Tulloch, A., Gordon, A., Mazor, T., Bunnefeld, N., Kark, S. (2013). Incorporating socioeconomic and political drivers of international collaboration into marine conservation planning. BioScience, 63(7), 547-563. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, V., Possingham, H., Jupiter, S., Roelfsema, C., Tulloch, A., Klein, C. (2013). Incorporating uncertainty associated with habitat data in marine reserve design. Biological Conservation, 162, 41-51. [More Information]
  • Guisan, A., Tingley, R., Baumgartner, J., Naujokaitis-Lewis, I., Sutcliffe, P., Tulloch, A., Regan, T., Brotons, L., McDonald-Madden, E., Mantyka-Pringle, C., et al (2013). Predicting species distributions for conservation decisions. Ecology Letters, 16(12), 1424-1435. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Possingham, H., Joseph, L., Szabo, J., Martin, T. (2013). Realising the full potential of citizen science monitoring programs. Biological Conservation, 165, 128-138. [More Information]
  • Tulloch, A., Mustin, K., Possingham, H., Szabo, J., Wilson, K. (2013). To boldly go where no volunteer has gone before: Predicting volunteer activity to prioritize surveys at the landscape scale. Diversity and Distributions, 19(4), 465-480. [More Information]

2012

  • Tulloch, A., Szabo, J. (2012). A behavioural ecology approach to understand volunteer surveying for citizen science datasets. Emu, 112(4), 313-325. [More Information]

2011

  • Tulloch, A., Possingham, H., Wilson, K. (2011). Wise selection of an indicator for monitoring the success of management actions. Biological Conservation, 144(1), 141-154. [More Information]

2007

  • Tulloch, A., Dickman, C. (2007). Effects of food and fire on the demography of a nectar-feeding marsupial: A field experiment. Journal of Zoology, 273(4), 382-388. [More Information]

2006

  • Tulloch, A., Dickman, C. (2006). Floristic and structural components of habitat use by the eastern pygmy-possum (Cercartetus nanus) in burnt and unburnt habitats. Wildlife Research, 33(8), 627-637. [More Information]

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